Wednesday March 20, 2019
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Hangover Lasts Longer Than One Day

Findings demonstrate that hangover can have serious consequences for the performance of everyday activities.

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Hangovers might last longer than you think
Hangovers might last longer than you think. Pixabay

If you think the effects of a booze session or a hangover on your thoughts and performance may get over the next day, you may be wrong. It lasts longer than a day, say, researchers, cautioning people to avoid activities such as driving.

The findings, published in the journal Addiction, showed that impairments in cognition seen when individuals are drunk are still present the day after, even when there is little or no alcohol present.

“We found that hangover impaired psychomotor speed, short and long-term memory and sustained attention. Impaired performance in these abilities reflects poorer concentration and focus, decreased memory and reduced reaction time the day after an evening of heavy drinking,” said lead author Craig Gunn from Britain’s University of Bath.

Patiala Peg is very North Indian party's quintessential drink. Pixabay
‘Patiala Peg’ is North Indian party’s drink. Pixabay

“Our review also indicated limited and inconsistent research on alcohol hangover and the need for future studies in the field,” Gunn added.

The research suggested that its findings have important implications when it came to activities performed when hungover, including driving.

For example, while hungover, individuals might typically wait until they believe there is no alcohol in the system before driving.

Also Read: Lifestyle Changes Can Cure Infertility

In addition, the researchers warn that although many workplaces have clear policies in place regarding alcohol intoxication at work, few cover the next day effects of alcohol.

“Our findings demonstrate that hangover can have serious consequences for the performance of everyday activities such as driving and workplace skills such as concentration and memory,” noted Sally Adams, Professor at the varsity. (IANS)

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Train Your Brain By Following Good Habits Constantly

The researchers have created a model which shows that forming good (and bad) habits depends more on how often you perform an action than on how much satisfaction you get from it.

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Good habits
Exercising Regularly can keep your brain healthy. VOA

If you want to form good habits — like going to the gym and eating healthy — then you need to train your brain by repeating actions until they stick, a new study suggests.

The researchers have created a model which shows that forming good (and bad) habits depends more on how often you perform an action than on how much satisfaction you get from it.

“Psychologists have been trying to understand what drives our habits for over a century, and one of the recurring questions is how much habits are a product of what we want versus what we do,” said Amitai Shenhav, Assistant Professor at Brown University.

exercise everyday
Exercise is crucial for everyone. Pixabay

“Our model helps to answer that by suggesting that habits themselves are a product of our previous actions, but in certain situations those habits can be supplanted by our desire to get the best outcome,” Shenhav added.

For the study, published in the journal Psychological Review, the researchers developed a computer simulation, in which digital rodents were given a choice of two levers, one of which was associated with the chance of getting a reward.

good habits
The researchers have created a model which shows that forming good (and bad) habits depends more on how often you perform an action than on how much satisfaction you get from it. VOA

The lever with the reward was the ‘correct’ one, and the lever without was the ‘wrong’ one.

The chance of getting a reward was swapped between the two levers, and the simulated rodents were trained to choose the ‘correct’ one.

Also Read:Exercise Can Help Fight Against Deep Abdominal Belly Fat: Study

When the digital rodents were trained for a short time, they managed to choose the new, ‘correct’ lever when the chance of a reward was swapped. However, when they were trained extensively on one lever, the digital rats stuck to the ‘wrong’ lever stubbornly, even when it no longer had the chance for a reward.

The rodents preferred to stick to the repeated action that they were used to, rather than have the chance for a reward. (IANS)