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Harassment Prevention at Workplace is Very Important Trend for Future: LinkedIn

The report looked at four key trends impacting the future of HR and the recruiting industry, both globally and in India: Soft Skills, Work Flexibility, Anti-Harassment and Pay Transparency

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LinkedIn makes recruiting process easier by launching the Scheduler feature. Wikimedia Commons
LinkedIn makes recruiting process easier by launching the Scheduler feature. Wikimedia Commons

A whopping 87 per cent of professionals in India say that harassment prevention at the workplace is a very important trend for the future of hiring and HR compared to 71 per cent globally, a new LinkedIn report said on Thursday.

In India, 50 per cent of hiring professionals said that companies now talk about their harassment policies as part of their pitch to potential hires — nearly double the global average of 29 per cent.

“Anti-harassment is an especially hot-button issue in India,” said the LinkedIn “Global Talent Trends 2019” report that surveyed over 5,000 talent professionals in 35 countries, including more than 400 professionals in India.

While 75 per cent of those surveyed globally noticed some change in workplace dynamics/culture over the last two years, 92 per cent in India said that their company has implemented some harassment prevention action or tactic in the last 12 months or is planning to — which is higher than the global average of 80 per cent.

There has been an over 71 per cent (year-on-year) increase in workplace harassment content shared on LinkedIn.

Employees are starting to feel more empowered to stand up against harassment – not just by calling for change, but by changing their own workplace behaviour, said the Microsoft-owned professional networking platform.

Work flexibility was another important factor in considering a new job.

“About 67 per cent of talent professionals in India agree that workplace flexibility — the option for employees to work when and where they’d like — is extremely important in shaping the future of recruiting and talent,” the findings showed.

Globally, in just the last two years, there’s been a 78 per cent increase in job posts on LinkedIn that mention work flexibility.

LinkedIn, LinkedIn trending stories, Twitter
Just as in Twitter, on the LinkedIn mobile app, members can find the day’s top stories on tapping inside the search bar. Pixabay

In the space of only four years, there’s been a 24 per cent increase in the number of people who say flexible work arrangements are a very important factor when considering a new job.

“With technology easing the way we work, 74 per cent respondents in India believe that the main benefit from allowing employees to work remotely, is enabling them to achieve better work-life satisfaction.

In the opinion of 66 per cent respondents, flexible work hours encourage employee retention.

“Women are 22 per cent more likely than men to cite flexible work arrangements as a very important factor when considering a job, with those aged 36 to 45 being the most likely to do so,” the report said.

The report looked at four key trends impacting the future of HR and the recruiting industry, both globally and in India: Soft Skills, Work Flexibility, Anti-Harassment and Pay Transparency.

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“Developing markets like India, Mexico and Brazil assign greater importance to soft skills in shaping the future of recruiting and HR,” said the report.

In India, 87 per cent respondents believe that candidates with strong soft skills will be increasingly important to the success of their organizations, however, only 53 per cent say their companies have a formal process for assessing soft skills.

“Nearly 71 per cent respondents in India agree that the top benefit of sharing salary ranges is fostering greater job satisfaction for employees. That said, 78 per cent also fear that this will create salary disputes among current employees,” the report noted. (IANS)

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Only 3% Indian Digital Marketers Calculate ROI Correctly: LinkedIn

According to a report by LinkedIn only 3% Indian digital marketers measure ROI correctly

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LinkedIn report
LinkedIn report says that very few Indian Digital Marketers can calculate ROI correctly. Pixabay

When it comes to measuring return on investment (ROI), only 3 per cent of digital marketers in India are calculating ROI correctly — one of the lowest among all regions and lower than the global average of 4 per cent, a LinkedIn report said on Wednesday.

While 78 per cent digital marketers in India claim to be measuring digital ROI long before a sales cycle has concluded, only 3 per cent of digital marketers are measuring ROI over a six-month period or longer.

This means that many marketers are likely not measuring ROI at all, said the ‘The Long and Short of ROI’ report by Microsoft-owned professional networking platform conducted among 4,000 marketing professionals across 19 countries, including India.

“The report highlights how Indian marketers are struggling to measure the true impact of performance; they are thinking short-term and are measuring KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) instead of ROI,” said says Virginia Sharma, Director, Marketing Solutions – India, LinkedIn.

“Measuring too quickly can have a poor impact on campaigns, specifically in industries such as higher education and real estate where it can take months of consideration before sale,” Sharma added.

Most Indian marketers measure ROI within the first 30 days of the campaign, which results in an inaccurate reflection of the actual return, considering that sales cycles are 60-90 days or longer.

Measuring ROI- LinkedIn
The LinkedIn report found that Indian marketers are struggling to measure the true impact of performance. Pixabay

Fifty per cent digital marketers rely on inaccurate metrics and use cost-per-click as their ROI metric, which does not show impact-per-advertising dollar spent.

As opposed to 58 per cent globally, 64 per cent Indian marketers acknowledged that they needed to show ROI numbers to justify spend and get approval for future budget asks.

This clearly shows how pressured Indian digital marketers are internally, hence rushing to measure and prove ROI, the report noted.

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While 60 per cent of Indian marketers who measure ROI in the short term end up having budget reallocation discussions within a month, 47 per cent of Indian digital marketers don’t feel confident about their ROI measurements today, the report added.

With over 60 million users, India is LinkedIn’s fastest-growing and largest market outside the US. (IANS)