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“Hardware Supply Chain is Coming Back To Normal”, Says Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

In its second quarter (October-December period), Microsoft reported revenue of $36.9 billion and a profit of $11.6 billion. Surface revenue for the quarter was up 6 per cent (year over year) to $1.9 billion

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Microsoft
Microsoft last month revised its revenue guidelines for its January-March quarter owing to Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, saying the supply-chain has been slowed down which will impact its Windows and Surface businesses. Pixabay

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has said that although hardware supply chain is coming back to normal, the big worry is people holding up the demand especially in the US and Europe as they battle with the spread of the COVID-19 disease.

Microsoft last month revised its revenue guidelines for its January-March quarter owing to Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, saying the supply-chain has been slowed down which will impact its Windows and Surface businesses.

In a statement, the company said although it sees strong Windows demand in line with its expectations, “the supply chain is returning to normal operations at a slower pace than anticipated at the time of our Q2 earnings call”.

According to a CNBC report on Tuesday, Nadella said that “on the supply side we are getting back on rails”, adding that the big question would be whether demand holds up in the US and Europe.

“We have a great balance sheet, we are a very diverse business, we have a mix of annuity, non-annuity, that is also stronger than even the last time we even went into the financial crisis. I feel confident we’ll come out of this, frankly, pretty strong,’ he was quoted as saying.

Satya Nadella
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has said that although hardware supply chain is coming back to normal, the big worry is people holding up the demand especially in the US and Europe as they battle with the spread of the COVID-19 disease. Wikimedia Commons

On January 29, Microsoft issued quarterly revenue guidance for its ‘More Personal Computing’ segment between $10.75 and $11.15 billion, which included a wider than usual range to reflect uncertainty related to the public health situation in China.

“As the conditions evolve, Microsoft will act to ensure the health and safety of our employees, customers, and partners during this difficult period,” said the company, adding that it would continue to partner with local and global health authorities to provide additional assistance.

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In its second quarter (October-December period), Microsoft reported revenue of $36.9 billion and a profit of $11.6 billion. Surface revenue for the quarter was up 6 per cent (year over year) to $1.9 billion. (IANS)

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Amazon Plans To Unveil Full-Fledged Cloud Gaming Platform

Amazon may launch an early version of its cloud gaming platform sometime this year if things are in order in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic

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Amazon
Amazon may launch an early version of its cloud gaming platform sometime this year if things are in order in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. VOA

Amazon is reportedly working on a full-fledged cloud gaming platform under the code name Project Tempo, similar to Google’s Stadia and Nvidia’s GeForce Now.

The retail giant has been working on a game called Crucible ever since 2014 and along with that game, the company is going to bring another game called New World, which will be a multiplayer online game and will fit perfectly in the multiplayer game genre, reports The New York Times.

“The big picture is about trying to take the best of Amazon and bringing it to games,” the report quoted Mike Frazzini, Amazon’s vice president for game services and studios as saying.

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Amazon
Amazon is reportedly working on a full-fledged cloud gaming platform under the code name Project Tempo, similar to Google’s Stadia and Nvidia’s GeForce Now. Wikimedia Commons

“We have been working for a while, but it takes a long time to make games, and we’re bringing a lot of Amazon practices to making games,” Frazzini added.

When it comes to cloud-based gaming, Amazon will have to compete with Microsoft and Google. Both of them already have their feet firmly planted in the space, Microsoft with Project xCloud and Google with Stadia.

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Amazon may launch an early version of its cloud gaming platform sometime this year if things are in order in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. (IANS)