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Haryana joins ban trend: Gutkha, pan masala banned

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source: narendramodi.in

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Chandigarh: The list of banned items seems to be increasing by the day. On Tuesday, the Haryana government announced a ban on the manufacturing and sale of gutka, pan masala, and other similar products which contain tobacco. Such products are now completely banned in the state.

source: downtoearth.org.in
source: downtoearth.org.in

People have mixed reactions on this ban; while some feel that it is a welcome step, there are others who are criticising this move.

Health Minister Anil Vij highlighted that the decision has been taken keeping in view the health of the people.

“The manufacturing, storage, distribution and sale of gutka, pan masala, flavoured or scented tobacco, kharra and other similar products containing tobacco have been completely banned. Other products containing tobacco which are available in market are also included in it,” he said.

The Food and Drugs Administration has issued a notification in this regard. Vij added that the notice prohibited the sale and purchase of tobacco products for one year starting from September 3 in the interest of public health.

The products under this ban includes a mix of other ingredients such as heavy metals and anti-caking agents, the only exception being specifically permitted ingredients, silver leaf, binders, flavours, scents and fragrances.

(With inputs from IANS)

Next Story

Researchers Probing if Tobacco’s Native Forms Less Harmful

“By working with the people who are disproportionately harmed by smoking, we can move on to co-design and testing of indigenous-centric solutions to reduce smoking harm.”

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hookah, cigarette, smoke
Hookah smoking is addictive and can lead to the use of other tobacco products such as cigarettes. Pixabay

Can indigenous ways of smoking counteract the harm being done by mass-produced cigarettes? Researching the roots of native Fijian tobacco plant ‘suki’ said to originated in Tamil Nadu and smoked in a “roll-up”, a renowned scientist from New Zealand is finding about the similar Indian cheroot.

On her visit to India, scientist Marewa Glover is accompanied by Fijian elder Setariki, who recalls learning that indentured labourers from India took tobacco plants with them to the South Pacific island country.

Looked at now, the Fijian suki appears to be processed similarly to cheroots found in Tamil Nadu’s Dindigul district.

Their visit was to see how similar the production process is for cheroot and ‘suki’ and to explore how people are using the cheroot today.

government information
FILE – Dr. Garen Wintemute, an emergency room physician at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center, poses at the hospital in Sacramento, Calif., March 9, 2017. Wintemute, who has researched gun violence and firearms industry, worked with colleagues to download public records from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms and other federal agencies after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. He and others feared the information might disappear from federal websites. VOA

“In India, mass-produced cigarettes made by tobacco companies have largely displaced cheroot use which is now viewed as an old and fading practice, as is the experience in Fiji,” Glover said in a statement.

“But as taxes on tobacco have been raised, native and Indian Fijians are turning back to growing, chewing and smoking suki,” the researcher, who is seeking to understand indigenous people’s use of tobacco in order to inform the reduction of disease associated with tobacco use, added.

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“The epidemic of tobacco-related diseases that cause about 7 million deaths around the world each year are mainly due to smoking the mass-produced cigarettes. Whilst smoking anything is damaging, prior to mass marketed cigarettes of tobacco companies, tobacco was harder to get and smoke and its use was often restricted using cultural rules,” she notes.

“By working with the people who are disproportionately harmed by smoking, we can move on to co-design and testing of indigenous-centric solutions to reduce smoking harm.” (IANS)