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Hate crime against Hindus: Statement on the robbery and death of Dr. Ravi Maharaj

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Hindu Holy Man makes purchases at produce market, Debe, Trinidad and Tobago. Image: Wikimedia Commons
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Ten years ago, millionaire businessman and medical doctor, Ravi Maharaj, 63, was found dead at his San Fernando home in Trinidad and Tobago, on 11 January 2006.

In a press statement released yesterday, Pandit Ramadheen Ramsamooj, Founder/Director of the Saraswati Mandiram in the USA and First Hindu Chaplain at Boston University, passed the following statement concerning the murder trial of Dr Ravi Maharaj and hate crimes against Hindus.

It was recently reported in a daily newspaper (Newsday June 3, 2016) that two men (Roger Greene and Brian Worrel) allegedly robbed and murdered Dr Ravi Maharaj in Trinidad and Tobago.

Greene was motivated by the belief that Maharaj was a Hindu worshipper and “God don’t like that.” Greene ‘chooked’ the Hindu with an ice pick and destroyed his murtis [sacred statues].

Jones (State attorney) asked Worrel what he had asked Greene, and he (Worrel) replied, “I said, like the job you went on, the man dead? Like you kill the man.” Worrel told the judge and jury from the witness box, that Greene told him the man (Dr. Maharaj) was an idol worshipper, a Hare Krishna worshipper and that he didn’t serve God.

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“Roger said the man (Dr. Maharaj) was a Hare Krishna worshipper and he mashed down statues and idols. God does not like those things. Roger took out TT$500. and said he will bless me with another TT$500. He said the man does worship idols and the man don’t want to show him where the safe was. He then told me, ‘I take an ice pick and chook up he feet’,” Worrel said from the witness box.

See details of the testimony hereAccused said victim was an idol worshipper

When the victim is a member of the peaceful and tolerant Hindu community, and when the gruesome act is fuelled with hate speech, and when the accused relishes the fact that the victim is an “idol worshipper,” and when the accused uses God as a motivation for such action, there must not be only a cause for concern, but a call for action.

In many countries there are laws against such hate crimes. In some countries such crimes are viewed so seriously that they are punishable by death.

Hate crimes have been committed on the Temple-in-the-sea in Waterloo, as well as on murtis [sacred statues] and jhandis[sacred flags] in many parts of the country.

Where will this trend take us? Today, we live in a multi-ethnic, multi-racial and multi-religious society in Trinidad and Tobago. People of different faiths live in one neighbourhood.

We condemn this barbaric act and hate speech against Dr. Ravi Maharaj. May his soul rest in peace.

Let us use his passing to educate our spiritual leaders and their congregations about the brotherhood of man, love for God and his creation, and peace on earth through respect, tolerance and coexistence.

Just as how we are now displaying that we have a passion for changing the laws relating to the legal age of marriage, we should engender the same passion for creating laws against hate speech and hate crimes.

-Pandit Ramadheen Ramsamooj, Ph.D.

Founder/Director of the Saraswati Mandiram in the USA

First Hindu Chaplain at Boston University

Adjunct Professor in the Center for Indic Studies at the University of Massachusetts in Dartmouth

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In Pakistan, Hindus don’t get even a ‘Crematorium:’ Will you believe that?

There are a lot of Hindu family residing all over Pakistan and still, there are very few cremation grounds where their last rites can be performed in that area

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Not having a crematorium in Peshawar is just one of the woes that the minority communities are facing since long. Wikimedia Commons
Not having a crematorium in Peshawar is just one of the woes that the minority communities are facing since long. Wikimedia Commons
  • Due to the lack of cremation grounds, some Hindus and Sikhs travel hundreds of kilometres just to perform the last rites as per their religious practices
  • As per reports, there were about 12 cremation grounds before Independence
  • Unfortunately, Hindu’s and Sikh’s have to face the same problem in the neighbouring state as well, that is Afghanistan

Death is said to be a great leveller. But the tragedy struck to some section of society in Muslim-dominated Pakistan is altogether different.

Due to the lack of cremation grounds, some Hindus and Sikhs travel hundreds of kilometres just to perform the last rites as per their religious practices. People who can’t even afford to travel, they have no option but to bury the mortal remains of their near and dear ones.

As per reports, there were about 12 cremation grounds before Independence. But with the passage of time, they vanished in the thin air of the terror-torn nation. Even in areas lying in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, where about 35,000 Hindus and Sikhs live, the cremation grounds are also rare.

Also Read: Today’s Social Issues and their Answers to Children

The law of the land is non-existent for the minorities communities like Hindu’s and Sikh’s. Without taking no-objection certificate, people from these communities can’t move an inch even. The grief-stricken families have to wait for the clearances, as they are left with no other option.

People are forced to travel long distances to cremate their relatives from the areas like Swat Bannu, Kohat, Malakand etc. The cost to travel such long distances ranges from Rs 40,000 to Rs 70,000 and on the top of it, the fear of robbery during these travels cannot be ruled out. Not all the Hindu families can afford to perform the last rites in the manner they want.

Unfortunately, Hindu’s and Sikh’s have to face the same problem in the neighbouring state as well, that is Afghanistan. The minority communities are compelled to bury the dead because cremation grounds are vanishing fast in Pakistan.

Although, Pakistan boats that the minority communities enjoy equal rights in their country, the ground reality seems to be completely different. Wikimedia Commons
Although, Pakistan boats that the minority communities enjoy equal rights in their country, the ground reality seems to be completely different. Wikimedia Commons

Although, the administration of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa has allowed the minorities communities to perform cremation near temples. But most of the temples are built on the agricultural lands and commercial areas, which have already been encroached upon by land mafia.

There are a lot of Hindu family residing in the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa and still, there are very few cremation grounds where their last rites can be performed in that area.

Although, Pakistan boats that the minority communities enjoy equal rights in their country, the ground reality seems to be completely different. Not having a crematorium in Peshawar is just one of the woes that the minority communities are facing since long.


After much of the protests, finally, the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government has started building the facility from the chief minister’s fund, as per some government sources.

There are almost 50,000 Sikhs and Hindus in Peshawar. And unfortunately, due to lack of proper facilities, people over there are also facing the same situation what others are facing in areas like Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

Also Read: 7 new-age social issues in India that need a check

To expect some kind of generosity from the war-torn state like Pakistan is out of the way. Instead of spending extravagantly on the military expansion, Pakistan should come forward and full-fill the basic amenities for the citizen of its country. It’s the people who make the country and not the other way round.