Tuesday August 21, 2018

Have Asthma? Don’t Shy Away From Your Doctor

The study cited several young adults feeling uncomfortable taking their medication in public settings

0
//
20
Have Asthma? Don't Shy Away From Your Doctor
Have Asthma? Don't Shy Away From Your Doctor. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Can’t find relief from asthma symptoms? Grill your doctor frequently to better understand your problem, says a study.

In order for asthma treatment to be effective, patients need to increase communication with their physicians, said researchers.

“When patients do not understand their condition or treatment plan, they may not follow life-saving guidelines, putting them at increased risk for asthma attacks,” said allergist and article author Stanley Fineman, past president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI).

Fineman noted that only eight to 13 percent of asthma sufferers continue to refill inhaled corticosteroid prescriptions after one year.

Taken early and as directed, these inhalers can improve asthma control, normalise lung function and even prevent irreversible injury to airways, said the study published in the journal titled Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

The study cited several young adults feeling uncomfortable taking their medication in public settings.

Asthma
Children with asthma use inhaler to relieve some of the symptoms. Wikimedia Commons

Several of them do not manage their condition as advised, which can lead to increased asthma attacks and emergency room visits.

“Allergists need to communicate the importance of continuing medication, and patients should express any concerns they might have, such as taking medication in public, since there are often solutions,” said allergist Alan Baptist, an ACAAI member and senior study author.

According to the study, many of young asthma sufferers said they stopped using prescribed medication when symptoms subsided.

Also Read: Human Touch Can Rehabilitate Patients

Although symptoms can become better with time, asthma is a chronic illness. Unless directed by a physician, asthma patients should never change or discontinue preventive medications.

Asthma is a serious disease and discontinuing treatment can be dangerous. “Sufferers need to be sure they regularly take medication and that all of their concerns are being addressed,” added Fineman.

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates, 235 million people suffer from asthma worldwide. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

40% of Women with Asthma Have a Risk of Developing Chronic Lung Diseases

Previous studies have found an alarming rise in ACOS in women in recent years and that the mortality rate from ACOS was higher in women than men.

0
Asthma inhaler
The researchers examined risk factors for developing asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, known as ACOS.. Flickr Commons

More than 4 in 10 individuals with asthma run the risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a group of lung diseases that block airflow and make it harder to breathe, says a new study involving around 4,000 women.

The researchers examined risk factors for developing asthma and COPD overlap syndrome, known as ACOS.

The findings, published in the journal Annals of the American Thoracic Society, showed that individual risk factors played a more significant role in the development of ACOS than exposure to fine particulate matter, a major air pollutant that because of its microscopic size penetrates deep into the lungs.

Women who had smoked more than the equivalent of a pack of cigarettes a day for five years, were much more likely to develop ACOS than those who smoked fewer cigarettes or never smoked.

However, ACOS did not affect only those who smoke as the researchers found that 38 per cent of the women who developed ACOS in the study had never smoked.

Lady With An Asthma Inhaler
The study also identified obesity, rural as significant risk factors for ACOS. VOA

The study also identified obesity, rural residence, lower education levels and unemployment as significant risk factors for ACOS.

The authors believe that these factors may result in suboptimal access to care, under-treatment of asthma and poor compliance to medications, all of which lead to more frequent asthma attacks.

These attacks in turn may lead to airway remodelling that increases the chances of developing ACOS.

Also Read: Lung Function Decline in Elderly Can be Delayed by Consuming Flavonoid

“Previous studies have found an alarming rise in ACOS in women in recent years and that the mortality rate from ACOS was higher in women than men,” said Teresa To, Professor atUniversity of Toronto in Canada.

“We urgently need to identify and quantify risk factors associated with ACOS in women to improve their health and save lives,” To added. (IANS)