Saturday December 14, 2019

Having Kids or Not, Life Satisfaction Remain Same

The researchers focused on the 34-46 age group

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Term insurance, time, Life Insurance

Parents with or without kids are just two sides of the same coin: non-parents are not ‘failed’ parents and parents are not ‘failed’ non-parents, says a study.

According to researchers, factors such as higher educational attainment, higher income, better health and religiosity enhance life satisfaction and they found that parents and non-parents have similar levels of life satisfaction.

“It is simply a mistake to presume that people with children have better lives,” said Angus Deaton, the Dwight D. Eisenhower professor of economics and international affairs at Princeton University.

“Some people like oranges, and some like apples, and we do not think that orange eaters should have better or worse lives than apple eaters,” he added.

However, adults with children at home experience more emotional highs and lows than those without children at home, said the study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Researchers examined data from the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index – a survey of 1.8 million Americans who evaluated their lives and reported daily emotional experiences between 2008 and 2012.

The researchers focused on the 34-46 age group.

kids
Representational image. Pixabay

They found that all emotions – happiness, smile, enjoyment, worry, stress and anger – were markedly higher among those who have children at home.

“Life evaluation is not the same as experienced emotions, such as happiness, enjoyment, sadness, worry or stress,” said Deaton.

“The results show that, no matter what else is taken into account, parents experience more of all of these than non-parents. There are good days and bad, ups and downs,” he added.

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For countries like India, where there is strong social pressure to become parents, Deaton and Stone say their argument does not apply.

In such countries, people may have children even when it does not increase their own life evaluation, though it may increase that of their parents or communities, said the study.

“The evidence for those countries does indeed show that parents have lower life evaluations, on average,” the study said.  (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s What 1.1 mn Children Learn About Santa Claus From Google Every Year

Additionally, search data reveals that there are on average 186,900 searches for 'How old is Santa' and 182,300 for 'Where is the North Pole' every year

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Santa Claus
FILE - A man dressed as Santa Claus rides his sleigh, pulled by a reindeer, as he prepares for Christmas on the Arctic Circle in Rovaniemi, northern Finland, Dec. 19, 2007. VOA

A recent report on Internet found that 1.1 million children learn online that Saint Nick is a fictitious character, as the first article in the search says ‘as adults we know Santa Claus is not real.’

When searching ‘Is Santa real’ the first article that is displayed comes from Quartz, which provides parents with advice on how to answer the question, dailymail.co.uk reported on Wednesday.

‘As adults we know Santa Claus isn’t real,’ an introductory sentence of the article reads.

Stephen Kenwright, Technical Search Engine Optimization Director at Rise at Seven, states that ‘Google is ranking this article on Quartz as the no.1 result based on the authority of the domain and reliability of the content.

‘Google’s algorithms choose the answer which best answers the question searched, taking safety into consideration all whilst being factually accurate.’

Santa Claus
Santa Claus dressed for Christmas. Wikimedia Commons

As per report, the results found that voice search technology responses are more creative when it comes to their responses to the query.

Alexa will reply with: ‘All I know is that someone has been eating mince pies and Father Christmas looks like the type.’

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“That’s something I am not allowed to disclause. I mean…disclose,” Siri replied.

Additionally, search data reveals that there are on average 186,900 searches for ‘How old is Santa’ and 182,300 for ‘Where is the North Pole’ every year. (IANS)