Thursday March 21, 2019

Health Benefits of eating more Whole Grains

Having a whole grain diet helps lose weight, as compared to refined grains -- rich in starch, gluten and devoid of natural fiber.

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Whole grains
Whole grains.Pixabay
  • Regularly consuming whole grain foods such as barley, brown rice, millet, oatmeal and rye may help lose weight
  • It also decreases the risk of heart disease and diabetes, a study has claimed.

Why should you eat more whole grains? Here is all you need to know

The findings showed that study participants who ate whole grains had less inflammation, particularly in overweight people, which increases the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

Further, participants were also found to eat less when whole grain products were on the menu because whole grain consumption causes satiety.

Importantly, having a whole grain diet helps lose weight, as compared to refined grains — rich in starch, gluten and devoid of natural fiber.

“Our analysis confirmed that there is a sound scientific basis for the dietary recommendation to eat whole grains. This may particularly apply to people who are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease or Type 2 diabetes,” said Tine Rask Licht, professor at the Technical University of Denmark.

Additionally, the researchers used DNA sequencing to analyze stool samples from the participants in order to examine whether the different diet types affected the participants’ gut bacteria composition.

Overall, the analysis did not show major effects of the dietary grain products on the composition of the lose weight.

“However, even though the analysis did not reveal significant changes in the average gut microbiota after whole grain consumption, it may well be that the individual components of our gut microbes has an impact on the individual reaction of our body to dietary whole grains,” Licht explained.

For the study, described in the journal Gut, the team included adults at risk of developing cardiovascular disease or Type 2 diabetes. The participants were divided randomly into two groups, with whole grain diet and refined varieties for eight weeks.(IANS)

Next Story

Joint Surgery May Spike up Blood Sugar Levels in Diabetics

Haemoglobin A1c above 6.59 for people with insulin-dependent diabetes and 6.6 without the condition was associated with an elevated risk for post-operative hyperglycemia

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Knee Joint. Pixabay.

People with diabetes who undergo joint replacement surgery are at higher risk of experiencing elevated blood sugar levels after the operation, increasing their chances of developing infections and other complications, a new study suggested.

Patients with insulin-dependent diabetes were more than five times as likely as those without the condition to develop hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, after surgery, said researchers, including Bradford Waddell from the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in the US.

“If your patient comes in with diabetes and is dependent on insulin, you need to be more cognizant of controlling their blood sugar in the perioperative period because they’re at higher risk,” said Waddell.

For the study, presented at the 2019 annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the team reviewed medical charts of 773 men and women who had undergone total hip or knee replacement surgeries between 2011 and 2016.

Of those, 437 had insulin-dependent diabetes, while 336 had not the condition. It included patients with a diagnosis of diabetes whose blood sugar was being controlled using the hormone insulin and compared them with diabetics who did not require insulin.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

Patients requiring insulin can be considered to have more severe diabetes and have a greater chance of experiencing elevated blood glucose in the perioperative period, Waddell said.

Patients with higher blood glucose over the previous three months — as measured by Hemoglobin A1c — were more likely to experience post-operative hyperglycemia regardless of which group they were in.

Also Read- Excessive Hygiene Can Cause Antibiotic Resistance, Says Study

Hemoglobin A1c above 6.59 for people with insulin-dependent diabetes and 6.6 without the condition was associated with an elevated risk for post-operative hyperglycemia.

However, despite the increased risk for elevation in blood sugar after surgery, the incidence of post-operative joint infections did not differ between the two groups of patients. The author also noted that a limitation of the study was that it was underpowered to detect the risk of infection. (IANS)