Saturday February 29, 2020

Find Out the Health Benefits of the Pear Fruit

Here's how the pear fruit can keep you healthy

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Pear fruit
The high-fiber, heart-healthy pear fruit stands out for its taste and nutritional value. Pixabay

If eating healthier and weight loss are priorities in the new year, find out how a pear a day keeps your pounds away and why you should choose this fruit every day in 2020.

The high-fiber, heart-healthy pear stands out for its taste and nutritional value. Here are a few benefits suggested by Pear Bureau Northwest:

Adding this juicy fruit in your day to day diet can make a huge difference, be it managing metabolic syndrome problems, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, even cancers or something as simple as weight management which almost all of us want to take care of.

Pears are rich in antioxidants and fibers, deficiency of which can cause something as minor as constipation or as major as cancer.

Talking of gut health, the dietary fiber found in pears helps the digestive tract run smoothly and keeps us regular. Pears being high in fiber almost acts like a broom moving through our system removing toxins and bad cholesterol from the body.

PEAR FRUIT
Pear fruit is rich in antioxidants. Pixabay

This lovely bell-shaped fruit is also an excellent source of vitamin C. A pear has around 8 mg of vitamin, an antioxidant that lends a hand to cell repair and cell regeneration. The vitamin also gives a powerful boost to our immune system and our skin, teeth, and bones. Have acne? Eat a pear!

If you tend to eat a lot of sodium-heavy processed foods like sauces, you might want to bite into a pear. Incorporating potassium-rich foods like pears help to flush out excess sodium from the body.

Also Read- Plants And Trees Can Curb Pollution More Effectively Than Technology

A medium pear has about 206 mg of the nutrient. Adding more potassium to cut down sodium can also help reduce your risk of high blood pressure.

Convinced enough to indulge in a pear? Go for this juicy fruit. (IANS)

Next Story

People with Damaged Livers Can Continue Medication for Diabetes

Even damaged livers can handle medicines for diabetes, BP

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Diabetes
People with diabetes, hypertension and depression might be able to continue taking life saving medications in small doses even while they heal from drug-induced liver injuries. Pixabay

People with diabetes, hypertension and depression might be able to continue taking life saving medications in small doses even while they heal from drug-induced liver injuries, suggests new research.

The findings, published in the journal Drug Metabolism and Disposition, suggests that doctors need not always make patients with drug-induced liver injury stop taking all their medications until the liver healed.

Drug-induced liver injury — when a person accidentally harms their liver by taking medications prescribed by a doctor (or occasionally over the counter drugs) — affects about almost 1 million people globally. “Doctors give patients drugs to treat diseases. No one wants their liver damaged, but it happens all the time,” said Xiaobo Zhong from the University of Connecticut in the US.

When a person takes a medication by mouth, it goes into their stomach and then to the intestines, where it is absorbed into the blood. This blood, in turn, passes first through the liver before reaching the rest of the body. The liver has enzymes that break down medicines.

But different people naturally have more or less of these enzymes. Sometimes, what could be a safe and effective dose in one person is too much for someone else who has different enzyme levels. This is why some individuals are more vulnerable to liver damage, even when taking drugs just as a doctor prescribed.

Diabetes
If patients have chronic conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, or depression, their conditions can run out of control if they do not take their medicines. Pixabay

There is no standard guidance for doctors when a patient gets drug-induced liver damage. Often times they tell the person to stop taking all medications immediately and wait for their liver to recover. But that can take weeks or months.

“But if patients have chronic conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, or depression, their conditions can run out of control,” if they stop taking the medications, Zhong said. And that can be life threatening.

The researchers tested whether mice whose livers had been damaged by acetaminophen (the active ingredient in Tylenol) had lower levels of drug metabolising enzymes, called cytochrome P450 enzymes.

The researchers investigated whether mice with drug-induced liver damage can safely take medications for diabetes, hypertension and depression. It looks like they can, as long as the doses are much smaller than normal, said the study.

Also Read- Air Pollution Increases Risk of Developing Kidney Diseases

Because the damaged liver does not break down the medications as efficiently, they are just as effective at these lower doses. The team still has to test whether these results hold in humans. (IANS)