Tuesday January 28, 2020
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Health Emergency Declared in Delhi NCR as Pollution ‘Severe Plus’

EPCA said the air pollution has peaked to hazardous levels, which will have adverse health impact on all

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Health, Emergency, Delhi
The overall air quality index (AQI) rose to 459 on Friday morning. According to a CPCB official, the AQI reached "severe plus" or "emergency" category on late Thursday night, which is the first time since January this year. Pixabay

Pollution in Delhi NCR is of “severe plus” category, which is hazardous to health, prompting the Supreme Court-mandated panel Environment Pollution (Prevention & Control) Authority (EPCA) to declare public health emergency in the national capital region.

The air quality deteriorated to such levels that people, particularly children, elderly and those having respiratory problems, can be vulnerable.

The overall air quality index (AQI) rose to 459 on Friday morning. According to a CPCB official, the AQI reached “severe plus” or “emergency” category on late Thursday night, which is the first time since January this year.

EPCA said the air pollution has peaked to hazardous levels, which will have adverse health impact on all.

Health, Emergency, Delhi
The air quality deteriorated to such levels that people, particularly children, elderly and those having respiratory problems, can be vulnerable. Pixabay

According to EPCA, “current air quality is a combination of the accumulated toxins because of local pollution, which was further spiked due to cracker burning on Diwali night, combined with stubble burning and extremely adverse weather”.

It is also unlikely the quality of air will improve within a week, and according to the IMD, if at all air improves, it is difficult to predict improvement in air quality will lead to substantial reduction in pollution.

EPCA has called for urgent directions to implement Graded Response Action Plan (GRAP), a policy measure to prevent worsening of air quality.

“Since pollution is in severe+ category, which is hazardous to health, schools have been advised to minimize exposure of children, as it will impact their health adversely. Also people are advised to minimize their personal exposure, which includes no exercise”, said Sambhavi Shukla, Programme Officer, Centre for Science and Environment.

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EPCA said it is imperative to take urgent steps to stop local sources of pollution, which includes local waste burning, as it will be an addition to the already polluted air. This encompasses stringent vigilance and punitive action against all cases of local pollution, from plastic and garbage burning to dust pollution.

In a public health emergency scenario, people are advised to stay indoors and if possible, cut down on outdoor activity as much as possible.

According to a senior official in the Central Pollution Control Board, during the ongoing health crisis triggered by bad quality air, people should avoid involvement in outdoor activities, which includes long exposure to outside air, and instead stay indoors for as long as possible.

Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal has announced that all schools in the Capital will remain closed till Tuesday. (IANS)

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Children of Mothers With Diabetes Are Likely To Suffer From Heart Diseases, Says Study

The researchers also found higher rates for specific types of CVD children of mothers with diabetes

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Diabetes
Diabetes was categorised as pregestational (before pregnancy) or gestational (during pregnancy) and women with diabetic complications were identified in the Study. Pixabay

Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset cardiovascular disease or CVD (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels) from childhood up to the age of 40, the researchers have warned.

The increased rates were more pronounced among children of mothers with a history of CVD or diabetic complications, said the study published in the journal The BMJ.

“Our study provides evidence that children of mothers with diabetes, especially those with a history of CVD or with diabetic complications, had increased rates of early onset CVD throughout the early decades of life,” said study researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark.

If this association is shown to be causal, preventing, screening, and treating diabetes in women of childbearing age could be important not only for improving the health of the women but also for reducing long term risks of CVD in their offspring, the researchers added

The number of women diagnosed with diabetes before or during pregnancy has increased globally, and children of these women are more likely to have risk factors for future CVD, such as high blood pressure and high blood sugar levels. It is unclear, however, whether or to what extent exposure to diabetes in the womb increases the risk of developing CVD in offspring over a lifetime.

So an international team of researchers set out to evaluate associations between diabetes diagnosed before or during pregnancy and early onset CVD in children during their first four decades of life. They base their findings on national registry data for over 2.4 million children born without congenital heart disease in Denmark from 1977 to 2016.

Diabetes was categorised as pregestational (before pregnancy) or gestational (during pregnancy) and women with diabetic complications were identified.

Diabetes
Children of mothers with diabetes have increased rates of early onset cardiovascular disease or CVD (conditions affecting the heart or blood vessels) from childhood up to the age of 40, the researchers have warned. Pixabay

Other potentially influential factors, such as mother’s age, education, lifestyle and medical history were also taken into account. During up to 40 years of follow-up, children of mothers with diabetes had a 29 per cent increased overall rate of early onset CVD compared with children of mothers who did not have diabetes (cumulative risks: 17.8 per cent vs 13.1 per cent ).

The researchers also found higher rates for specific types of CVD children of mothers with diabetes, particularly heart failure (45 per cent), hypertensive disease (78 per cent), deep vein thrombosis (82 per cent), and pulmonary embolism (91 per cent).

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Increased rates were seen in each age group in childhood (before 20 years of age) and early adulthood (from 20 to 40 years of age), regardless of the type of diabetes they were exposed to (pregestational or gestational) and rates were similar for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the study said. (IANS)