Friday June 21, 2019

Heart Attacks More Severe in Morning Than Night, Warn Researchers

For the study, researchers looked into separate studies that compared immune cell time-of-day rhythms under normal conditions, inflammation and disease

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Heart
The study compared people aged 41-50 years and 40 or younger heart attack survivors and found that among patients who suffer a heart attack at a young age overall is 40 or younger. VOA

Heart attacks that mostly happen in the morning tend to be more severe than cardiac arrests at night, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Trends in Immunology, discusses how time of the day affects severity of afflictions, ranging from allergies to heart attacks. For example, studies showed that adaptive immune responses — in which highly specialised, pathogen-fighting cells develop over weeks — are under circadian control.

Researchers compiled studies, predominantly in mice, that looked at the connection between circadian rhythms and immune responses. “This is ‘striking’ and should have relevance for clinical applications, from transplants to vaccinations,” said study senior author Christoph Scheiermann, Professor at the University of Geneva in Switzerland.

According to researchers, in both humans and mice, the numbers of white blood cells also oscillate in a circadian manner, raising the question whether it might be possible one day to optimise immune response through awareness and utilisation of the circadian clock.

heart disease
Representational image. (IANS)

For the study, researchers looked into separate studies that compared immune cell time-of-day rhythms under normal conditions, inflammation and disease.

“Investigating circadian rhythms in innate and adaptive immunity is a great tool to generally understand the physiological interplay and time-dependent succession of events in generating immune responses,” said Scheiermann.

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“The challenge lies in how to channel our growing mechanistic understanding of circadian immunology into time-tailored therapies for human patients,” Scheiermann remarked. (IANS)

Next Story

Unable to Sleep at Night? This One Trick Can Help Advance Snooze Time by 2 Hours

Having a late sleep pattern puts you at odds with the standard societal days

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Sleep, Night, Trick
Such changes can also lead to improved performance in the mornings. Pixabay

Researchers have found that a simple tweak to the sleeping patterns and maximising outdoor light during the mornings for a period of three weeks can help night owls — people with extreme late sleeping and waking habits – bring forward their sleep/wake timings by two hours.

Such changes can also lead to improved performance in the mornings, better eating habits and a decrease in depression and stress among people with late sleeping habits, showed the findings.

The study, published in the journal Sleep Medicine, showed that it was possible to shift the circadian rhythm of ‘night owls’ using non-pharmacological and practical interventions.

“Having a late sleep pattern puts you at odds with the standard societal days, which can lead to a range of adverse outcomes – from daytime sleepiness to poorer mental wellbeing,” said study co-author Andrew Bagshaw from the University of Birmingham in the UK.

Sleep, Night, Trick
A simple tweak to the sleeping patterns and maximising outdoor light during the mornings for a period of three weeks can help night owls. Pixabay

The researchers wanted to see if simple things could solve this issue.

In an experiment with a small group of participants that spanned for three weeks, the group were asked to wake up two-three hours before regular wake up time and maximise outdoor light during the mornings.

They were also asked to go to bed two-three hours before habitual bedtime and limit light exposure in the evening, have fixed sleep/wake times on both work days and free days and have breakfast as soon as possible after waking up, eat lunch at the same time each day, and refrain from eating dinner after 7 p.m.

“We wanted to see if there were simple things people could do at home to solve this issue. This was successful, on average allowing people to get to sleep and wake up around two hours earlier than they were before,” Bagshaw said.

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“Most interestingly, this was also associated with improvements in mental wellbeing and perceived sleepiness, meaning that it was a very positive outcome for the participants.” (IANS)