Saturday January 25, 2020

Heart Attacks More Severe in Morning Than Night, Warn Researchers

For the study, researchers looked into separate studies that compared immune cell time-of-day rhythms under normal conditions, inflammation and disease

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Heart
The study compared people aged 41-50 years and 40 or younger heart attack survivors and found that among patients who suffer a heart attack at a young age overall is 40 or younger. VOA

Heart attacks that mostly happen in the morning tend to be more severe than cardiac arrests at night, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Trends in Immunology, discusses how time of the day affects severity of afflictions, ranging from allergies to heart attacks. For example, studies showed that adaptive immune responses — in which highly specialised, pathogen-fighting cells develop over weeks — are under circadian control.

Researchers compiled studies, predominantly in mice, that looked at the connection between circadian rhythms and immune responses. “This is ‘striking’ and should have relevance for clinical applications, from transplants to vaccinations,” said study senior author Christoph Scheiermann, Professor at the University of Geneva in Switzerland.

According to researchers, in both humans and mice, the numbers of white blood cells also oscillate in a circadian manner, raising the question whether it might be possible one day to optimise immune response through awareness and utilisation of the circadian clock.

heart disease
Representational image. (IANS)

For the study, researchers looked into separate studies that compared immune cell time-of-day rhythms under normal conditions, inflammation and disease.

“Investigating circadian rhythms in innate and adaptive immunity is a great tool to generally understand the physiological interplay and time-dependent succession of events in generating immune responses,” said Scheiermann.

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“The challenge lies in how to channel our growing mechanistic understanding of circadian immunology into time-tailored therapies for human patients,” Scheiermann remarked. (IANS)

Next Story

Walking, Cycling Linked with Fewer Heart Attacks: Researchers

For women who walked to work there was an associated 1.7 per cent reduction in heart attacks the following year. For men who cycled to work there was also an associated 1.7 per cent reduction in heart attacks the following year, the study said

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CyclingStress, meditation, PTSD
Cycling, walking in nature may improve your mental health. Pixabay

Walking and cycling to work is associated with fewer heart attacks in adults, say, researchers, adding that could provide important health benefits.

According to the study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, in areas where walking or cycling to work were more common in 2011, the incidence of heart attacks in UK decreased for both men and women across the following two years.

“Our study at the University of Leeds shows that exercise as a means of commuting to work is associated with lower levels of heart attack. The benefits of regular exercise are numerous and we support initiatives to help everyone become and stay active,” said study co-author and Olympic-medal winning triathlete Alistair Brownlee.

The study looked at the 2011 UK Census data, which included 43 million people aged 25-74 years employed in England, and found that 11.4 per cent were active commuters. Walking was more popular than cycling (8.6 per cent vs. 2.8 per cent).

Active commuting was defined as people who reported their main mode of transport to work as either ‘bicycle’ or ‘on foot’ in the UK Census.

Rates of active travel varied significantly between local authorities across England, with as few as five per cent of people walking or cycling to work in some authorities, compared to as many as 41.6 per cent in other areas.

Walk, Jogging, Economic
Adding an extra 15 minutes of daily walking, or jogging a steady one kilometer each day, would improve productivity and extend life expectancy – leading to more economic growth. Pixabay

There was also a sex difference for active travel in the 2011 Census data, with more men cycling to work than women (3.8 per cent vs. 1.7 per cent), but more women walking to work than men (11.7 per cent vs. 6.0 per cent).

The researchers acknowledged that the big risk factors for heart disease are a lack of exercise, being overweight, smoking and diabetes.

After adjusting for these, the researchers found that active commuting was linked with additional health benefits in some cases.

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For women who walked to work there was an associated 1.7 per cent reduction in heart attacks the following year. For men who cycled to work there was also an associated 1.7 per cent reduction in heart attacks the following year, the study said.

“Whilst we cannot conclusively say that active travel to work lowers the risk of heart attack, the study is indicative of such a relationship,” said study lead author Chris Gale, Professor at the University of Leeds.

“The effect of active commuting is fairly modest when compared with the stronger determinants of cardiovascular health such as smoking, obesity, diabetes, and regular exercise. However, this study clearly suggests that exercising on the way to work has the potential to bring nationwide improvements to health and wellbeing,” Gale said. (IANS)