Monday October 14, 2019

Heart Attacks More Severe in Morning Than Night, Warn Researchers

For the study, researchers looked into separate studies that compared immune cell time-of-day rhythms under normal conditions, inflammation and disease

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Heart
The study compared people aged 41-50 years and 40 or younger heart attack survivors and found that among patients who suffer a heart attack at a young age overall is 40 or younger. VOA

Heart attacks that mostly happen in the morning tend to be more severe than cardiac arrests at night, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Trends in Immunology, discusses how time of the day affects severity of afflictions, ranging from allergies to heart attacks. For example, studies showed that adaptive immune responses — in which highly specialised, pathogen-fighting cells develop over weeks — are under circadian control.

Researchers compiled studies, predominantly in mice, that looked at the connection between circadian rhythms and immune responses. “This is ‘striking’ and should have relevance for clinical applications, from transplants to vaccinations,” said study senior author Christoph Scheiermann, Professor at the University of Geneva in Switzerland.

According to researchers, in both humans and mice, the numbers of white blood cells also oscillate in a circadian manner, raising the question whether it might be possible one day to optimise immune response through awareness and utilisation of the circadian clock.

heart disease
Representational image. (IANS)

For the study, researchers looked into separate studies that compared immune cell time-of-day rhythms under normal conditions, inflammation and disease.

“Investigating circadian rhythms in innate and adaptive immunity is a great tool to generally understand the physiological interplay and time-dependent succession of events in generating immune responses,” said Scheiermann.

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“The challenge lies in how to channel our growing mechanistic understanding of circadian immunology into time-tailored therapies for human patients,” Scheiermann remarked. (IANS)

Next Story

Improving Diet Cuts Risk of Heart Attacks in Kids, Says Study

“Students will learn to classify foods as fresh, minimally processed, processed, and ultra-processed, and to prioritise fresh and minimally processed items,” Turke added

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dietary supplements
"People should focus on getting their nutrients from a heart-healthy diet, because the data increasingly show that the majority of healthy adults don't need to take supplements," Michos said. Wikimedia Commons

Encouraging physical activity and improving diet in children is crucial to cut deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD), a new study suggests.

“Atherosclerosis – clogged arteries – starts in childhood and is more likely with a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy diet,” said study lead author Karine Turke.

“Exposure to these behaviours throughout life increases the risk of heart attacks and strokes, so prevention should begin in childhood,” Turke said.

Cardiovascular disease is the world’s number one killer, causing 17.9 million deaths a year.

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that the number of overweight or obese infants and young children rose from 32 million globally in 1990 to 41 million in 2016.

Around 3.2 million deaths each year are due to insufficient physical activity.

Diet
Representational image. Pixabay

The study presented at the Brazilian Congress of Cardiology in Porto Alegre, shows baseline results in the 433 Brazilian students surveyed.

The median age was 13 years and 51 per cent were male. The median time spent doing mild, moderate and vigorous physical activity over one week was 40 and 60 minutes, respectively. The median sitting time was 360 minutes per week.

“Physical activity is well below the level recommended by the WHO, which is 300 minutes per week for children and adolescents,” said Turke.

Regarding food, 53 per cent had consumed leafy vegetables the previous day, 69 per cent fruit, 91 per cent carbohydrates like rice or pasta, 70 per cent legumes, 79 per cent meat, 42 per cent soft drinks, 39 per cent chocolate, 39 per cent powdered beverage mixes, 42 per cent sausages and 49 per cent candy, including chocolate or any other sweets.

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“Many had eaten processed foods, which are easier for parents to prepare than cooking from fresh ingredients,” said Turke.

“Students will learn to classify foods as fresh, minimally processed, processed, and ultra-processed, and to prioritise fresh and minimally processed items,” Turke added. (IANS)