Saturday August 18, 2018

Heart Patients Need to Focus on Fitness And Exercise, Not Weight Loss

It may be that weight is less important for heart patients, but we know that physical activity is very important

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Fitness (Representational image)
Fitness (Representational image). Pixabay
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Patients with heart disease should focus more on increasing their physical activity level, and not just weight loss, for a long life, researchers suggest.

The findings, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), showed that heart disease patients can gain weight without jeopardising their health, but sitting in their recliner incurs significant health risks.

“The fact that gaining weight posed no increased risk when patients were already overweight, I think is a bit surprising,” said Trine Moholdt from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway.

The results indicate that weight gain does not seem to increase the risk for already overweight patients, which would mean that it isn’t dangerous for a fat heart patient to gain a few pounds. What is dangerous is if the person does not engage in any form of exercise.

People who are physically active live longer than those who are not. Sustained physical activity over time was associated with substantially lower mortality risk.

Heart patients should focus on exercise than weight loss
Heart patients should focus on exercise than weight loss. Pixabay

“It may be that weight is less important for heart patients, but we know that physical activity is very important,” Moholdt added.

However, the findings do not mean that it is never a good idea for an overweight heart patient to slim down.

“In our view, desired or intentional weight reduction may be useful for overweight or obese individuals, although little data supports this view in studies of coronary heart disease patients,” Moholdt said.

Also Read: Good Heart Health Prevents Frailty in Old Age

For the study, the team examined 3,307 individuals (1,038 women) with coronary heart disease.

The results showed that the risk of premature death was higher for the group of patients who were completely inactive than for either of the other groups. The prognosis for people who exercise a little bit, even if it is below the recommended level, is better than not exercising at all.

“Even being somewhat active is better than being inactive, but patients have to maintain the activity level. Physical activity is perishable–if you snooze you lose its benefits,” Moholdt noted. (IANS)

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Preventing Type 2 Diabetes With The Help of Weight Loss

How weight loss can help stop Type-2 diabetes

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Weight Loss as a Cure for Type 2 Diabetes
Weight Loss as a Cure for Type 2 Diabetes. Pixabay

Losing weight can lead to an early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancreatic beta cells, which can help individuals with Type-2 diabetes to achieve remission, a study has found.

The findings suggest that weight loss normalizes fat metabolism in all individuals with Type-2 diabetes, but the more rapid loss of the capacity of beta cells to recover prevents some individuals from returning to a non-diabetic state.

“The knowledge of reversibility of Type-2 diabetes, ultimately due to re-differentiation of pancreatic beta cells, will lead to further targeted work to improve understanding of this process. This provides a major focus for cell biologists to make specific advances,” said Roy Taylor of Newcastle University in the UK.

“At present, the early management of Type-2 diabetes tends to involve a period of adjusting to the diagnosis plus pharmacotherapy with lifestyle changes, which in practice are modest. Our data suggest that substantial weight loss at the time of diagnosis is appropriate to rescue the beta cells,” he added.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

In a clinical trial conducted recently, nearly half of the individuals with Type-2 diabetes achieved remission to a non-diabetic state after a weight-loss intervention delivered within six years of diagnosis.

The study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism, reveals that this successful response to weight loss is associated with the early and sustained improvement in the functioning of pancreatic beta cells. This finding challenges the previous paradigm that beta-cell function is irreversibly lost in patients with Type-2 diabetes.

Some non-responders simply had not lost enough weight, but in those who had, it was not clear how their response differed from that of responders.

Also Read: Eating Fresh Fruits Everyday May Keep Diabetes at Bay

To find out, the team examined liver fat content, pancreatic fat content, blood concentrations of fats called triglycerides, and beta-cell function and found both groups lost these metabolic factors.

However, only the responders demonstrated early and sustained improvement in beta-cell function. Pancreatic beta cells secrete insulin in two phases in response to an increase in blood glucose concentration, the researchers noted. (IANS)