Thursday February 21, 2019

Heart Patients Need to Focus on Fitness And Exercise, Not Weight Loss

It may be that weight is less important for heart patients, but we know that physical activity is very important

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Fitness (Representational image)
Fitness (Representational image). Pixabay

Patients with heart disease should focus more on increasing their physical activity level, and not just weight loss, for a long life, researchers suggest.

The findings, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), showed that heart disease patients can gain weight without jeopardising their health, but sitting in their recliner incurs significant health risks.

“The fact that gaining weight posed no increased risk when patients were already overweight, I think is a bit surprising,” said Trine Moholdt from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway.

The results indicate that weight gain does not seem to increase the risk for already overweight patients, which would mean that it isn’t dangerous for a fat heart patient to gain a few pounds. What is dangerous is if the person does not engage in any form of exercise.

People who are physically active live longer than those who are not. Sustained physical activity over time was associated with substantially lower mortality risk.

Heart patients should focus on exercise than weight loss
Heart patients should focus on exercise than weight loss. Pixabay

“It may be that weight is less important for heart patients, but we know that physical activity is very important,” Moholdt added.

However, the findings do not mean that it is never a good idea for an overweight heart patient to slim down.

“In our view, desired or intentional weight reduction may be useful for overweight or obese individuals, although little data supports this view in studies of coronary heart disease patients,” Moholdt said.

Also Read: Good Heart Health Prevents Frailty in Old Age

For the study, the team examined 3,307 individuals (1,038 women) with coronary heart disease.

The results showed that the risk of premature death was higher for the group of patients who were completely inactive than for either of the other groups. The prognosis for people who exercise a little bit, even if it is below the recommended level, is better than not exercising at all.

“Even being somewhat active is better than being inactive, but patients have to maintain the activity level. Physical activity is perishable–if you snooze you lose its benefits,” Moholdt noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Patients Going Through Gender-Transition Treatment At A Grater Risk Of Cardiac Diseases

Researchers determined and compared the incidence of CVD cases in the transgender population with that reported in the general population. 

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On the other hand, transmen -- those assigned female sex at birth but had male gender identity and received hormones -- had a more than three-fold rise in heart-attack risk compared with women, said the study, published in the journal, Circulation. Pixabay

Patients receiving hormone therapy as part of their gender-transition treatment have an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart attacks, strokes and blood clotting, researchers say.

Researchers determined and compared the incidence of CVD cases in the transgender population with that reported in the general population.

The study showed that transwomen — individuals, assigned male sex at birth but with female gender identity, receiving hormones as part of their transition — had more than twice as many strokes as women and nearly twice as many strokes as men.

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Heart attacks occurred at more than twice the rate among transwomen than women. Pixabay

In addition, there were five times as many blood clotting among transwomen than women and 4.5 times more than men.

Heart attacks occurred at more than twice the rate among transwomen than women.

On the other hand, transmen — those assigned female sex at birth but had male gender identity and received hormones — had a more than three-fold rise in heart-attack risk compared with women, said the study, published in the journal, Circulation.

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In addition, there were five times as many blood clotting among transwomen than women and 4.5 times more than men. 
Pixabay

“In the light of our results, we urge both physicians and transgender individuals to be aware of this increased cardiovascular risk,” said Nienke Nota, researcher at the Amsterdam University Medical Center in the Netherlands.

Also Read: Push-ups Can Lower The Risk of Heart Diseases

“It may be helpful to reduce the risk factors by stopping smoking, exercising, eating a healthy diet and losing weight, if needed before starting therapy, and clinicians should continue to evaluate patients on an ongoing basis thereafter,” suggested Nota.

For the study, the researchers included 3,875 individuals who had received hormone treatment — 2,517 transgender women received estrogen, with or without androgen-suppressors, and 1,358 transgender men received testosterone — as part of their transition. (IANS)