Saturday January 25, 2020

Common Heartburn Drug Linked to Kidney Disease Risk, Says Study

Patients who took only PPIs reported a kidney-related adverse reaction at a frequency of 5.6 per cent against 0.7 per cent for patients who took only histamine-2 receptor antagonists

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Kidney, Polycystic, Disease, Treatment
Nature Communications shows an approximately 50 per cent reduction in kidney size in afflicted mice following treatment. Pixabay

Intake of widely prescribed drugs to neutralise stomach acid by people with heartburn or stomach ulcers could be associated with increased risk of kidney disease, warns a study of over 40,000 patients.

The study, published in the Scientific Reports journal, showed patients who took proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were more likely to experience kidney disease than those who took another type of drug used to dampen down acid production called H2 blockers.

The patients who took only PPIs were 28.4 times more likely to report chronic kidney disease, as well as acute kidney injury (4.2 times more likely), end-stage renal disease (35.5 times more likely) and unspecified kidney impairment (eight times more likely), said researchers including Ruben Abagyan, Professor from the University of California-San Diego.

According to the World Health Organisation, PPIs are essential medicines for many people, helping them to control symptoms that are often painful and disruptive to daily life.

Kidney Injury
Representational image. (IANS)
But Abagyan hopes this initial data will prompt healthcare providers to appropriately warn, educate and monitor patients who require PPIs, particularly if they are at an elevated risk for kidney disease and electrolyte abnormalities.

For the study, the team looked at a data of 43,000 patients who took PPIs and the control group, approximately 8,000 patients who took histamine-2 receptor blockers, such as Zantac or Pepcid, and no other medications.

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Patients who took only PPIs reported a kidney-related adverse reaction at a frequency of 5.6 per cent against 0.7 per cent for patients who took only histamine-2 receptor antagonists.

However, the researchers cautioned the study does not reveal absolute frequency of these kidney-related complaints for all people taking PPIs. A large, randomised, controlled clinical trial would be needed to show causality between PPI usage and absolute risk of kidney disease in humans. (IANS)

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Obesity Causes Diabetes in Women, Kidney Disease in Men, Says New Study

The impact of obesity, however, manifests differently in men and women

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Obesity
An overweight woman sits on a chair in Times Square in New York, May 8, 2012. (Representational image). VOA

Obesity poses a higher risk of type 2 diabetes in women, and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease in men, said a new study from the University of Oxford.

“The study shows just how harmful carrying excess weight can be to human health, and that women and men may experience different diseases as a result,” said the study’s first author Jenny Censin.

To identify additional causes of death made worse by obesity, researchers performed an analysis that explores cause-and-effect relationships using genetic data and three measures of obesity from 228,466 women and 195,041 men in the UK Biobank.

Their analysis showed that obesity contributes to a laundry list of health problems including coronary artery disease, type 1 and 2 diabetes, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic liver disease and kidney failure.

obesity
Two women converse in New York, June 26, 2012. The nation’s obesity epidemic continues to grow, led by an alarming increase among women. Obesity is one of the risk factors of heart failure. VOA

While obesity causes type 2 diabetes in both women and men, women experienced a higher risk of type 2 diabetes as compared to men, while men faced a greater risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease.

“Given the compelling evidence of harm that arises as a consequence of obesity across a broad range of diseases that result in death, our findings highlight the critical need for public health measures to stem the tide of obesity,” said researcher Michael Holmes, who supervised the work together with researcher Cecilia Lindgren.

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Overall, the study found that obesity causes or contributes to the majority of the leading causes of death worldwide that are not linked to the infectious diseases.

The impact of obesity, however, manifests differently in men and women. (IANS)