Friday July 20, 2018
Home India Here is why F...

Here is why Flowers in Hinduism regarded as Symbol of Piousness and Serenity!

Flowers are an integral part of every religious ceremony in hinduism

0
//
460
Hinduism in Australia
A ritual in Hinduism. Wikimedia
Republish
Reprint

April 10, 2017: Hinduism is a religion known for its pious procedures of performing a “pooja” ceremony.Many things become the part of the act of showing gratitude to the almighty be it “kapoor”, ”kumkum”, ”pure ghee”, “Dhoop batti” and many more to count.It is also very well known that flowers find a special place in the hindu prayer ceremonies. There are separate flowers for different deities and each one has a legend to follow exhibiting their significance to that particular god or goddess. Flowers are the symbols of hindu ceremonies.

They are offered to deities during prayers, used to decorate weddings and their usage varies from one thing to the other.

A marriage ceremony is incomplete in Hinduism without flowers as they complete each step from start to finish.

As for Hindus, the flowers are significant, but ever wondered why some flowers hold more importance than others?

Here is a list of flowers found to be sacred in Hinduism-:

Rose; Source-Pixabay
    1. Rose-In Hinduism and in many parts of the world, this is the flower of love and affection. In India, it is also used for its medicinal values.Rose petals are spread on newlywed’s bed as it is believed that the flower creates romance between the couple.
Jasmine; Source-Pixabay
    1. Jasmine-Lord Vishnu, the preserver of the Universe has a colourful personality. He like wine, enjoys music and loves to becked up. He represents the cultural elements of our society. Lord Vishnu likes white and fragrant colours like mogra, jasmine etc. Apart from aromatic flowers, this Hindu god loves basil leaves.Since the time of Vedas, Jasmine has found mention in the Hindu scriptures. The flower, in Hindu weddings, is often used as the bridal flower. It symbolises everlasting love between the married couple.
Hibiscus; Source-Pixabay
    1. Hibiscus-Adishakti or the essence of all female power in the Universe is known as Kali in her most destructive form. She is a blood thirsty goddess who represents wearing a garland of Asura heads and blood dripping from her mouth. To match the colour of blood, she worshipped with blood-red hibiscus flowers.

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Hibiscus is considered as the tongue of Goddess Kali and offered to her during prayers. The bright red colour is symbolic of the fierceness of Kali.
It is seen as a flower that brings wealth and destroys enemies from one’s life.

 

Lotus; Source-Pixabay
    1. Lotus-  A symbol of beauty, in Hindu scripture, goddess Lakshmi is shown sitting on red lotus and Saraswati on a white one. The lotus is also associated with Lord Brahma.Lotus is rooted in mud but stay aflot on water without getting muddy, which shows, in Hinduism how one should live in the world with getting attached to the negative surroundings.The flower also represents triumph, wealth and fertility and is India’s national flower.
Mariold; Source-Pixabay
  1. Red Genda (Marigold)- The lord of the world Ganesha like red colour flowers just like Lakshmi. Red Genda (Marigold) flowers please him greatly. The Genda is special because it is the only flower of the gods that can be divided into its petals. Scientifically too, each petal of the Marigold flower is a flower in itself.
    It is widely used to make garlands for gods and goddesses in Hindu religion. This flower is considered a love charm and is also used in weddings.Also, its pleasant aroma keeps insects and pests away. It is said, marigold represents passion and creativity in other cultures.

These are some of the flowers that are sacred to the hindus along with many others.They fill the color and fragrance in the hindu culture.

– by Nikita Tayal of NewsGram Twitter @NikitaTayal6

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Shankaracharya: A remarkable genius that Hinduism produced (Book Review)

The irony is that most leading scientists, particularly outside India but also within, have little knowledge of the structure of Shankara's philosophy and the transparent interface it has with scientific discoveries today.

0
He was greatly influenced by three basic texts of Hindu philosophy: Upanishads, the Brahma Sutra and the Bhagavad Gita
He was greatly influenced by three basic texts of Hindu philosophy: Upanishads, the Brahma Sutra and the Bhagavad Gita.

Title: Adi Shankaracharya: Hinduism’s Greatest Thinker; Author: Pavan K. Varma; Publisher: Tranquebar Press; Pages: 364; Price: Rs 699

This must be one of the greatest tributes ever paid to Shankaracharya, the quintessential “paramarthachintakh”, who wished to search for the ultimate truths behind the mysteries of the universe. His genius lay in building a complete and original philosophical edifice upon the foundational wisdom of the Upanishads.

A gifted writer, Pavan Varma, diplomat-turned-politician and author of several books including one on Lord Krishna, takes us through Shankara’s short but eventful span of life during which, from having been born in what is present-day Kerala, he made unparalleled contributions to Hindu religion that encompassed the entire country. Hinduism has not seen a thinker of his calibre and one with such indefatigable energy, before or since.

Shankara’s real contribution was to cull out a rigorous system of philosophy that was based on the essential thrust of Upanishadic thought but without being constrained by its unstructured presentation and contradictory meanderings.

He was greatly influenced by three basic texts of Hindu philosophy: Upanishads, the Brahma Sutra and the Bhagavad Gita. He wrote extensive and definitive commentaries on each of them. Of course, the importance he gave to the Mother Goddess, in the form of Shakti or Devi, can be traced to his own attachment to his mother whom he left when he set off, at a young age, in search of a guru and higher learning.

The irony is that most leading scientists, particularly outside India but also within, have little knowledge of the structure of Shankara's philosophy and the transparent interface it has with scientific discoveries today.
Shankara wrote hymns in praise of many deities but his personal preference was the worship of the Mother Goddess.

Against all odds, Shankara created institutions for the preservation and propagation of Vedantic philosophy. He established “mathas” with the specific aim of creating institutions that would develop and project the Advaita doctrine. He spoke against both caste discriminations and social inequality, at a time when large sections of conservative Hindu opinion thought otherwise.

Shankara was both the absolutist Vedantin, uncompromising in his belief in the non-dual Brahman, and a great synthesiser, willing to assimilate within his theoretical canvas several key elements of other schools of philosophy. He revived and restored Hinduism both as a philosophy and a religion that appealed to its followers.

Also Read: Hinduism: The Nine Basic Beliefs that you need to know

Varma rightly says that it must have required great courage of conviction as well as deep spiritual and philosophical insight for Shankaracharya to build on the insights of the Upanishads a structure of thought, over a millennium ago, that saw the universe and our own lives within it with a clairvoyance that is being so amazingly endorsed by science today. The irony is that most leading scientists, particularly outside India but also within, have little knowledge of the structure of Shankara’s philosophy and the transparent interface it has with scientific discoveries today.

Shankara wrote hymns in praise of many deities but his personal preference was the worship of the Mother Goddess. The added value of the book is that it has, in English, a great deal of Shankara’s writings. Unfortunately, most Hindus today are often largely uninformed about the remarkable philosophical foundations of their religion. They are, the author points out, deliberately choosing the shell for the great treasure that lies within. This is indeed a rich book. (IANS)