Wednesday January 29, 2020

Researchers Claim, High-Calorie Food Intake in Stress Can Lead To Grater Weight Gain

To understand what controls this 'stress eating', the researchers investigated different areas of the brain in mice. 

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According to the findings published in the journal-Cell Metabolism, some individuals eat less when they are stressed but most will increase their food intake -- and crucially, the intake of calorie-dense food high in sugar and fat. Pixabay

Eating too much high-calorie food is anyway bad for health but under stress, sugary and high-fat diet can lead to more weight gain than in normal situations, says a study.

During an experiment on mice, the team discovered that a high-calorie diet when combined with stress resulted in more weight gain than the same diet caused in a stress-free environment.

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The scientists discovered that chronic stress alone raised the blood insulin levels only slightly but in combination with a high-calorie diet, the insulin levels were 10 times higher than mice that were stress-free and received a normal diet. Pixabay

“This study indicates that we have to be much more conscious about what we’re eating when we’re stressed, to avoid a faster development of obesity,” said Professor Herbert Herzog said, Head of the Eating Disorders laboratory at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in New South Wales (NSW).

According to the findings published in the journal-Cell Metabolism, some individuals eat less when they are stressed but most will increase their food intake — and crucially, the intake of calorie-dense food high in sugar and fat.

To understand what controls this ‘stress eating’, the researchers investigated different areas of the brain in mice.

While food intake is mainly controlled by a part of the brain called the hypothalamus, another part of the brain — the amygdala — processes emotional responses, including anxiety.

weigh loss
During an experiment on mice, the team discovered that a high-calorie diet when combined with stress resulted in more weight gain than the same diet caused in a stress-free environment. Pixabay

The scientists discovered that chronic stress alone raised the blood insulin levels only slightly but in combination with a high-calorie diet, the insulin levels were 10 times higher than mice that were stress-free and received a normal diet.

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“We were surprised that insulin had such a significant impact on the amygdala,” said Professor Herzog.

“It’s becoming more and more clear that insulin doesn’t only impact peripheral regions of the body but that it regulates functions in the brain. We’re hoping to explore these effects further in future,” Herzog added. (IANS)

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Weight-Loss Surgery May Help in Reducing Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Study

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals

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Cancer
Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer. Pixabay

Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

The study, published in the British Journal of Surgery (BJS), showed that patients who underwent bariatric surgery had a greater than 35 per cent reduction in the risk of developing colorectal cancer compared with obese individuals who had no surgery.

“Day by day, the scientific community is continuing to uncover the benefits of weight- loss surgery, and this paper affirms this,” said study lead author Sulaiman Almazeedi from Jaber Al-Ahmed Hospital in Kuwait.

“Obesity today remains one of the most preventable causes of morbid disease and early death, and despite the controversy, we believe weight-loss surgery can be an important tool in tackling this epidemic,” Almazeedi added.

Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer.

According to the researchers, the BJS analysis, which included seven studies with a total of 12,13,727 patients and an average follow-up of seven years, was conducted because individual studies have presented conflicting results.

Cancer
Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Pixabay

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals.

ALSO READ: New Motorola Smartphone Likely To Pack a Stylus, May Give Tough Competition To Samsung Galaxy Note Series

The overall risk of developing colorectal cancer was three in 1,000 in patients with obesity who underwent weight-loss surgery, compared with four in 1,000 in those who did not, the study said. (IANS)