Tuesday November 20, 2018

High Cholesterol Level Increased Risk of Death, Even in Healthy People

Limiting saturated fat intake, maintaining a healthy weight, discontinuing tobacco use, should apply to everyone,

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Red wine contains a plant compound called saponin which blocks the body's absorption of bad cholesterol, LDL. Pixabay
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People who are young and healthy may still be vulnerable to the risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease if they have higher levels of bad cholesterol, according to a new research.

Bad cholesterol, or LDL, contributes to clogged arteries which increases the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The findings showed that compared with participants who had LDL readings of under 100 mg/dL, those with LDL levels in the range of 100-159 mg/dL had a 30 to 40 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease death.

Those with LDL levels of 160 mg/dL or higher had a 70 to 90 per cent increased risk of cardiovascular death, compared with participants who had LDL readings of under 100 mg/dL.

“Our study demonstrates that having a low 10-year estimated cardiovascular disease risk does not eliminate the risk posed by elevated LDL over the course of a lifetime,” said lead author Shuaib Abdullah, from the University of Texas in the US.

cholesterol checkup
New method may remove the idea of fasting before cholesterol test.

“High cholesterol at younger ages means there will be a greater burden of cardiovascular disease as these individuals age,” added Robert Eckel, from the University of Colorado in the US.

The study, published in the journal Circulation, included 36,375 young, relatively healthy participants who were free of diabetes or cardiovascular disease and were followed for 27 years.

Among the group (72 per cent men with an average age 42 years), there were 1,086 deaths from cardiovascular disease such as stroke, and 598 coronary heart disease deaths.

“Those with low risk should pursue lifestyle interventions, such as diet and exercise, to achieve LDL levels as low as possible, preferably under 100 mg/dL.

Also Read: Eating Strawberries Boosts Gut Health, Here’s How

“Limiting saturated fat intake, maintaining a healthy weight, discontinuing tobacco use, and increasing aerobic exercises should apply to everyone,” Abdullah said. (IANS)

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Managing Cholesterol Might Help To Reduce Alzheimer’s Risk

These included several points within the CELF1/MTCH2/SPI1 region on chromosome 11 that previously had been linked to the immune system

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alzheimer's, cholesterol
Can managing cholesterol reduce Alzheimer's risk? Read it out here. Pixabay

Managing cholesterol might help reduce Alzheimer’s risk, says researchers, including one of Indian-origin, who identified a genetic link between the progressive brain disorder and heart disease.

Examining DNA from more than 1.5 million people, the study showed that risk factors for heart disease such as elevated triglyceride and cholesterol levels (HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol) were genetically related to Alzheimer’s risk.

However, genes that contribute to other cardiovascular risk factors, like body mass index and Type-2 diabetes, did not seem to contribute to genetic risk for Alzheimer’s.

“The genes that influenced lipid metabolism were the ones that also were related to Alzheimer’s disease risk,” said Celeste M. Karch, Assistant Professor at the Washington University’s School of Medicine.

Thus, if the right genes and proteins could be targeted, it may be possible to lower the risk for Alzheimer’s disease in some people by managing their cholesterol and triglycerides, added Rahul S. Desikan, Assistant Professor at the UCSF.

For the study, published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica, the team identified points of DNA that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and also heighten the risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

"The question for us now is not how to eliminate cholesterol from the brain, but about how to control cholesterol's role in Alzheimer's disease through the regulation of its interaction with amyloid-beta," Vendruscolo said.
In Alzheimer’s disease, patients start losing memory, Pixabay

The team looked at differences in the DNA of people with factors that contribute to heart disease or Alzheimer’s disease and identified 90 points across the genome that were associated with risk for both diseases.

Their analysis confirmed that six of the 90 regions had very strong effects on Alzheimer’s and heightened blood lipid levels, including several within genes that had not previously been linked to dementia risk.

These included several points within the CELF1/MTCH2/SPI1 region on chromosome 11 that previously had been linked to the immune system.

Also Read- Longer Exposure to Honking Traffic Makes You Obese

The researchers confirmed their findings in a large genetic study of healthy adults by showing that these same risk factors were more common in people with a family history of Alzheimer’s, even though they had not themselves developed dementia or other symptoms such as memory loss.

“These results imply that cardiovascular and Alzheimer’s pathology co-occur because they are linked genetically. That is, if you carry this handful of gene variants, you may be at risk not only for heart disease but also for Alzheimer’s,” Desikan said. (IANS)