Saturday October 20, 2018

High-Fibre Diets Are Good For Stress, According To Scientists

The research provides new insights into mechanisms related to the impact of the gut bacteria on the brain and behaviour as well as gut health

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Eat fibre-rich food to cut stress and anxiety. Pixabay
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If you want to reduce your stress then you should eat more pulses, wholegrain cereals, oats and vegetables as consumption of high-fibre foods may help reduce the effect of stress, says a study.

The authors explained that stress can cause major changes in the gut and also in our brain which in turn affects our behaviour.

Foods rich in fibre was found to reduce this adverse effects of stress in mice.

The findings suggested that a gut bacteria produces short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are the main source of nutrition for cells in this region of the body and high levels of fibres stimulate the production of these SCFAs

“There is a growing recognition of the role of gut bacteria and the chemicals they make in the regulation of physiology and behaviour. The role of short-chain fatty acids in this process is poorly understood up until now,” said corresponding author John F. Cryan from University College Cork in Ireland.

“It will be crucial that we look at whether short-chain fatty acids can ameliorate symptoms of stress-related disorders in humans,” Cryan added.

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Foods rich in fibre was found to reduce this adverse effects of stress in mice. Pixabay

For the study, published in The Journal of Physiology, the team fed normally produced SCFAs to the mice and then subjected them to stress. They were assessed for anxiety and depressive like behaviour, stress responsiveness, cognition and sociability as well as how easily material passes through the gut.

The results showed that increase levels of SCFAs reduced the levels of stress and anxiety-like behaviour among the mice.

The investigators also explained that stress experienced over a prolonged period of time can affect the bowel by making the barrier between the inside of the gut and the rest of the body less effective and “leaky”.

Also Read: Childhood Stress You Suffered May Affect Your Kids

Treating the condition using the SCFAs can also reverse the “leaky” walls inside the gut, said the study.

The research provides new insights into mechanisms related to the impact of the gut bacteria on the brain and behaviour as well as gut health.

“Developing dietary treatments which target these bacteria will be important for treating stress-related disorders,” said the researchers. (IANS)

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Higher Levels of Stress May Reduce Fertility in Women, says Study

The researchers did not find an association between men's PSS score and the likelihood of conceiving

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Stress reduces fertility in women, but not in men: Study. Pixabay

Higher levels of stress can lower conception or fertility in women but it does not affect men, finds a study.

The researchers, from Boston University in the US, found that the association between higher levels of stress and lower levels of conception could be due to decreased intercourse frequency, increased partner stress discordance and higher levels of menstrual cycle irregularity.

“Although this study does not definitely prove that stress causes infertility, it does provide evidence supporting the integration of mental health care in preconception guidance and care,” said Amelia Wesselink, Research Assistant at the varsity.

For the new study, published in American Journal of Epidemiology, the team analysed 4,769 women and 1,272 men who did not have a history of infertility and had not been trying to conceive for more than six menstrual cycles.

The team measured perceived stress using the 10-item version of the stress scale (PSS) to assess how unpredictable, uncontrollable, and overwhelming individuals find their life circumstances.

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Representational image. Pixabay

On average, baseline PSS scores were about 1 point higher among women than men and the average follow-up PSS scores among women remained fairly constant over the 12 months.

The findings revealed that women with PSS scores of at least 25 were 13 per cent less likely to conceive than women with PSS scores under 10.

This association was stronger among women who had been trying to conceive for no more than two menstrual cycles than among women who had been trying for three or more cycles before enrolling. The association was also stronger among women under 35 years.

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The researchers did not find an association between men’s PSS score and the likelihood of conceiving.

However, couples in the study were about 25 per cent less likely to conceive when the man’s PSS score was under 10 and the women’s was 20 or higher, said the researchers. (IANS)

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