Tuesday December 11, 2018

High-Fibre Diets Are Good For Stress, According To Scientists

The research provides new insights into mechanisms related to the impact of the gut bacteria on the brain and behaviour as well as gut health

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Eat fibre-rich food to cut stress and anxiety. Pixabay
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If you want to reduce your stress then you should eat more pulses, wholegrain cereals, oats and vegetables as consumption of high-fibre foods may help reduce the effect of stress, says a study.

The authors explained that stress can cause major changes in the gut and also in our brain which in turn affects our behaviour.

Foods rich in fibre was found to reduce this adverse effects of stress in mice.

The findings suggested that a gut bacteria produces short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are the main source of nutrition for cells in this region of the body and high levels of fibres stimulate the production of these SCFAs

“There is a growing recognition of the role of gut bacteria and the chemicals they make in the regulation of physiology and behaviour. The role of short-chain fatty acids in this process is poorly understood up until now,” said corresponding author John F. Cryan from University College Cork in Ireland.

“It will be crucial that we look at whether short-chain fatty acids can ameliorate symptoms of stress-related disorders in humans,” Cryan added.

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Foods rich in fibre was found to reduce this adverse effects of stress in mice. Pixabay

For the study, published in The Journal of Physiology, the team fed normally produced SCFAs to the mice and then subjected them to stress. They were assessed for anxiety and depressive like behaviour, stress responsiveness, cognition and sociability as well as how easily material passes through the gut.

The results showed that increase levels of SCFAs reduced the levels of stress and anxiety-like behaviour among the mice.

The investigators also explained that stress experienced over a prolonged period of time can affect the bowel by making the barrier between the inside of the gut and the rest of the body less effective and “leaky”.

Also Read: Childhood Stress You Suffered May Affect Your Kids

Treating the condition using the SCFAs can also reverse the “leaky” walls inside the gut, said the study.

The research provides new insights into mechanisms related to the impact of the gut bacteria on the brain and behaviour as well as gut health.

“Developing dietary treatments which target these bacteria will be important for treating stress-related disorders,” said the researchers. (IANS)

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Human Body May Not Cope With Evening Stress, Study Reveals

The team first measured the diurnal rhythm of salivary cortisol levels from the volunteers and then exposed one group to stress test in the morning, and another to the evening

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Your body may not cope with evening stress: Study. Pixabay

Human bodies which experience stress in the evening release less cortisol — the primary stress hormone in humans — compared to stressful events in the morning, and thus may pose vulnerabilities, according to a new research.

The study, led by medical physiologist Yujiro Yamanaka at Japan’s Hokkaido University, the body’s central system reacts less strongly to acute psychological stress in the evening than it does in the morning, suggesting possible vulnerability to stressful events in the evening.

“Our study suggests a possible vulnerability to stress in the evening. However, it is important to take into account each individual’s unique biological clock and the time of day when assessing the response to stressors and preventing them,” Yamanaka commented.

The study, published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology Reports, explored a small group of young and healthy volunteers with normal work hours and sleep habits to find out if the “hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal” (HPA) axis responds differently to acute psychological stress according to the time of day.

The HPA axis connects the central nervous and endocrine systems of the body. Cortisol is released for several hours when the HPA axis is activated by a stressful event.

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Representational image. Pixabay

This helps provide the body with energy in the face of a perceived need for fight or flight. Cortisol levels are also regulated by a master circadian clock in the brain and are normally high in the morning and low in the evening.

The team first measured the diurnal rhythm of salivary cortisol levels from the volunteers and then exposed one group to stress test in the morning, and another to the evening.

Also Read- Millions Of Urban Children Worse Than Rural People: UNICEF

The researchers found that salivary cortisol levels increased significantly in the volunteers that took the stress test in the morning while no such response was observed in those that took the test in the evening.

“Our body can respond to the morning stress event by activating the HPA axis and sympathetic nervous system, but it needs to respond to evening stress event by activating the sympathetic nervous system only,” Yamanaka said. (IANS)