Tuesday December 11, 2018

High Immunity Protein at Birth Cuts Childhood Malaria Risk

For the study, published in the Journal of Scientific Reports, the team examined 349 Mozambican pregnant women and their newborn babies up to two years of age

0
//
newborn
A teenager caressing the newborn. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Newborn babies who are born with a high level of an immune-related protein in their blood cells are less likely to develop malaria throughout their early childhood, a study revealed.

The research showed that babies born with a high level of a certain type of immunity proteins cytokine, known as IL-12, in their umbilical cord blood had a higher resistance to the development of malaria in the first two years of their life.

“The finding suggests that there is a strong link between levels of this IL-12 protein obtained from the umbilical cord blood and the development of malaria in early childhood,” said lead author Yong Song, from Curtin University in Australia.

With more than 90 per cent of malaria infections occurring in sub-Saharan Africa, childhood malaria remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality, resulting in 500,000 deaths annually.

Malaria is caused by parasites that are spread to people through mosquito bites.
Malaria is caused by parasites that are spread to people through mosquito bites. (VOA)

The team also investigated how newborn babies develop high levels of IL-12 in the cord blood.

“We found that the inbred quantity of these small proteins was not only influenced by children and mother’s genetic variation, but was also dependent on the immune system conditions of the mother during pregnancy,” Song noted.

Also Read: FDA Approves Drug to Stop Some Malaria Relapses

For the study, published in the Journal of Scientific Reports, the team examined 349 Mozambican pregnant women and their newborn babies up to two years of age.

“The study could have significant implications for future vaccine design techniques that could assist with the prevention of malaria in high-risk countries such as Mozambique,” said co-author Brad Zhang, Associate Professor from Curtin’s School of Public Health. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Childhood Violence May Spur Puberty, Depression: Study

The association between the ageing metrics and symptoms of depression may offer a way for doctors to identify children who need help, the researchers said

0
Neighborhoods
Childhood violence may spur puberty, depression: Study. Pixabay

Children who are exposed to violence such as physical, emotional, or sexual abuse are more likely to experience faster biological ageing, including pubertal development and increased symptoms of depression, finds a research.

The study showed that in children who experienced early life violence, accelerated epigenetic ageing was associated with increased symptoms of depression.

This means that faster biological ageing may be one way that early life adversity “gets under the skin” to contribute to later health problems.

Conversely, children exposed to forms of early life deprivation including neglect and food insecurity were more likely to experience their puberty at a later stage compared with their peers, the researchers said.

“The findings demonstrate that different types of early-life adversity can have different consequences for children’s development,” said Katie McLaughlin, postdoctoral student at the University of Washington.

350 million people are known to suffer depression Pixabay
The study showed that in children who experienced early life violence, accelerated epigenetic ageing was associated with increased symptoms of depression. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Biological Psychiatry, the team examined 247 children and adolescents aged eight to 16 years.

The results indicated that accelerated ageing following exposure to violence early in life can already be detected in children as young as eight years old.

In addition, the team found that there is a need for increased societal investment in reducing the exposure of children to violence and for biomedical and psychological research to reduce the impact of these experiences throughout the lives of these vulnerable individuals.

Also Read- Do Not Toxify The Environment Senselessly

The association between the ageing metrics and symptoms of depression may offer a way for doctors to identify children who need help, the researchers said.

“Accelerated epigenetic age and pubertal stage could be used to identify youth who are developing faster than expected given their chronological age and who might benefit from intervention,” McLaughlin noted. (IANS)