Sunday September 15, 2019

High Levels of Testosterone May Raise Heart Failure Risk in Men

For the study, researchers included almost four lakh men and women aged 40 to 75 years

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Heart rate
Heart rate, Flickr
Men with genetic predisposition to high testosterone levels could be at increased risk of developing blood clots and heart failure, a study has found.
The study, led by City University of New York researchers, aimed to determine whether endogenous testosterone has a causal role in blood clots (thromboembolism), heart failure and heart attack (myocardial infarction).
They found endogenous testosterone was positively associated with thromboembolism, heart failure, and myocardial infarction in men.
The findings, published by The BMJ, can also have implications for men who take testosterone supplements to boost energy levels and sex drive, said Mary Schooling, Professor at the varsity.
Endogenous testosterone can be controlled with existing treatments and could be a modifiable risk factor for thromboembolism and heart failure, she noted.
Heart Attack, women
Anti-inflammatory drugs may put you at heart attack risk.
Pixabay
“We need to be thinking of new directions for reducing heart disease and this is one way of doing it,” Schooling was quoted as saying to The Guardian.
She pointed out that statins, which are used to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke, have been found to lower testosterone levels.
“To protect men we should be looking at treatments and lifestyles which are more on the side of keeping testosterone lower rather than higher,” she said.
For the study, researchers included almost four lakh men and women aged 40 to 75 years.
The associations were found less obvious in women. (IANS)

Next Story

Researchers Can Now Detect Heart Failure with 100% Accuracy with the Help of Artificial Intelligence

Conversely, their new model uses a combination of advanced signal processing and machine learning tools on raw ECG signals, delivering 100 per cent accuracy

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Artificial Intelligence Bot
Artificial Intelligence Bot. Pixabay

With the help of Artificial Intelligence(AI), researchers have developed a neural network approach that can accurately identify congestive heart failure with 100 per cent accuracy through analysis of just one raw electrocardiogram (ECG) heartbeat.

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a chronic progressive condition that affects the pumping power of the heart muscles. Associated with high prevalence, significant mortality rates and sustained healthcare costs, clinical practitioners and health systems urgently require efficient detection processes.

The researchers have worked to tackle these important concerns by using Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) – hierarchical neural networks highly effective in recognising patterns and structures in data.

“We trained and tested the CNN model on large publicly available ECG datasets featuring subjects with CHF as well as healthy, non-arrhythmic hearts. Our model delivered 100 per cent accuracy: by checking just one heartbeat we are able detect whether or not a person has heart failure,” said study researcher Sebastiano Massaro, Associate Professor at the University of Surrey in the UK.

artificial intelligence, nobel prize
“Artificial intelligence is now one of the fastest-growing areas in all of science and one of the most talked-about topics in society.” VOA

“Our model is also one of the first known to be able to identify the ECG’ s morphological features specifically associated to the severity of the condition,” Massaro said.

Published in Biomedical Signal Processing and Control Journal, the research drastically improves existing CHF detection methods typically focused on heart rate variability that, whilst effective, are time-consuming and prone to errors.

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Conversely, their new model uses a combination of advanced signal processing and machine learning tools on raw ECG signals, delivering 100 per cent accuracy.

“With approximately 26 million people worldwide affected by a form of heart failure, our research presents a major advancement on the current methodology,” said study researcher Leandro Pecchia from the University of Warwick. (IANS)