Tuesday January 21, 2020

Psychology States High Pitched Voice in Social Situations Can be Inferiority complex

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Source: Wikimedia commons
  • A new study conducted by the University of Stirling says that if people change their tone according to the social status of people shows inferiority complex
  • Both men and women alter their pitch in response to people they think are dominant and prestigious
  • Individuals who are looked upon by other people talk in a calm and controlled manner without any regard to whom they talk to

UK, July 30, 2017: The way we talk other people has the most impact in Human communication. It makes a particular perception about the people and is the deciding factor for future communications. That is why we include personality development classes for students to deal with the complex yet the daily process of communication.

To make a lasting impact, one need a firm and a calm voice so that the other person feel comfortable and easy talking and that is a crucial factor in communication. For an appropriate response, the message need to be clear and sound to the listener.

A new study taken by the University of Stirling say that if people change their tone according to the social status of people shows inferiority complex in those people. The research conducted by putting volunteers through a simulated job interview task, focusing on their vocal characteristics.

It came out that people responding to those with a higher social status tend to use a higher pitch for communication. Deep and masculine voice sounded dominant and on the other hand the raise in the pitch or high pitched voice usually sounded submissive or inferior. So if someone perceived the interviewer as more dominant, they raise their pitch.

Viktoria Mileva, Research Assitant at Department of Psychology says that. “”These changes in our speech may be conscious or unconscious but voice characteristics appear to be an important way to communicate social status. We found both men and women alter their pitch in response to people they think are dominant and prestigious.”

The research also shows that people who believed that they are dominant try to use methods of manipulation, coercion, and intimidation to acquire social status and usually won’t vary their pitch but try to speak in a lower tone. Individuals who are looked upon by other people talk in a calm and controlled manner without any regard to whom they talk to.

While answering the questions, the individuals lower their tone when answering complex interpersonal questions. Dr Mileva said, “Signals and perceptions of human social status have an effect on virtually every human interaction, ranging from morphological characteristics – such as face shape – to body posture, specific language use, facial expressions, and voices. Understanding what these signals are, and what their effects are, will help us comprehend an essential part of human behavior.”

On this topic, the experts said that the same could be true for other situations where there is a difference between the people in term of social status and that may apply to most of the situations.

– by a staff writer of NewsGram

Next Story

Children Facing Behavioural Issues More Like to Be Anti-Social: Study

Behavioural issues in kids makes them anti-social

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Anti-social kids
A link between anti-social or aggressive behaviour and CU traits characterised by lack of empathy, guilt, and reduced sensitivity to others' emotions is already well known. Pixabay

Researcher have found that young children who exhibited less fear and desire for social connection and who engaged less frequently in a copycat behaviour called arbitrary imitation developed more callous-unemotional (CU) traits, which are known to lead to anti-social behaviour later.

A link between anti-social or aggressive behaviour and CU traits–characterised by lack of empathy, guilt, and reduced sensitivity to others’ emotions–is already well known, according to the study published in the Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry.

This translates to a child who is “less compassionate, doesn’t care about breaking the rules, doesn’t change a behaviour when they’re told, ‘If you do X, this bad thing will happen’,” said study researcher Rebecca Waller from University of Pennsylvania in the US.

anti-social kids
Kids with behavioural issues develop callous-unemotional (CU) traits, which are known to lead to anti-social behaviour later. Pixabay

“They’re also more likely to be aggressive to get what they want because they don’t fear the consequences,” Waller added.

For the findings, the researchers used data from the Boston University Twin Project.

During two two-hour lab visits, at age 3 and again at age 5, children played out several scenarios, like offering a parent ‘candy’ from a canister that actually contained a stuffed snake, popping bubbles, or separating different-coloured beads into piles.

Analysis of the children’s behaviours showed that less fearful children who cared less about social connections at the first visit were more likely to develop callous-unemotional traits by the second.

“Fearlessness on its own is not the only ingredient, these children also don’t feel, to the same degree, that inherent motivation and reward from having positive social bonding with others,” said Waller.

The researchers also found that harsh parenting–which includes tactics like yelling and spanking–intensified the fearlessness and strengthened the link with later CU traits.

Anti social behaviour
Analysis of the children’s behaviours showed that less fearful children who cared less about social connections at the first visit were more likely to be anti-social. Pixabay

According to the researchers, the study conducted with a different set of two- and three-year-old BU Twin Study participants, compared instrumental and arbitrary imitation.

“Arbitrary imitation is intended to build bonds, to show another person that you’re in their group, that you accept their ways, that you can and will do what they’re doing,” said study researcher Nicholas Wagner from Boston University in the US.

For this work, the team built a pair of experiments. In the first, children had to free a stuffed bird from a hard-to-open cage.

An adult showed them how, interspersing necessary instruction with unneeded vocalisations like “Look, it’s a birdy!”

During a second task, children had to use a stick to liberate a cracker stuck in the middle of a clear tube. Again, an adult modelled the steps, mixing essential and arbitrary directions.

In both cases, researchers watched and coded which behaviours the children repeated and which they ignored.

Also Read- Families of Children With Autism Likely to Face Mental and Social Burdens: Study

They found that the two-year-olds who engaged in less arbitrary imitation overall–in other words, those who ignored more of the unneeded actions–were at greater risk for developing CU traits later.

“This says to us that these children are less motivated to make connections with other kids or adults. The same was not true for instrumental imitation,” Wagner said. (IANS)