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High-Speed Encryption to Help in Fighting Against Future Cyber Threats

Scientists have developed a new system with features of high-speed encryption that will ensure protection against future cyber threats

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High-speed encryption will ensure protection from future cyber threats. Pixabay.
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New York, Nov 27: In a bid to fight against the future cyber threats, scientists have developed a new system with high-speed encryption properties that drives quantum computers to create theoretically hack-proof forms of data encryption.

The novel system is capable of creating and distributing encryption codes at megabit-per-second rates, which is five to 10 times faster than existing methods and on par with current internet speeds when running several systems in parallel.

The technique is secure from common attacks, even in the face of equipment flaws that could open up leaks.

“We are now likely to have a functioning quantum computer that might be able to start breaking the existing cryptographic codes in the near future,” said Daniel Gauthier, Professor at The Ohio State University.

“We really need to be thinking hard now of different techniques that we could use for trying to secure the internet,” Gauthier added, in the paper appearing in the journal Science Advances.

For the new system to work, both the hacker as well as the sender must have access to the same key, and it must be kept secret.

The novel system uses a weakened laser to encode information or transmit keys on individual photons of light, but also packs more information onto each photon, making the technique faster.

By adjusting the time at which the photon is released, and a property of the photon called the phase, the new system can encode two bits of information per photon instead of one.

This trick, paired with high-speed detectors powers the system to transmit keys five to 10 times faster than other methods.

“It was changing these additional properties of the photon that allowed us to almost double the secure key rate that we were able to obtain if we hadn’t done that,” Gauthier said. (IANS)

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Stronger Encryption is The Best Way to Prevent Cyber Attacks, say Apple

Apple and the US Federal Bureau of Investigation engaged in a showdown in 2016 over the iPhone used by an assailant in the San Bernardino terror attack

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Weaker encryption boon for criminals, warns Apple. Pixabay

Countering a common argument that strong encryption may come in the way of well-meaning investigation of criminal activities, Apple has stressed that stronger — not weaker — encryption is the best way to protect against threats of cyber attacks and terrorism.

In a letter to the Australian government, the Cupertino, California-headquartered tech giant asserted that encryption was in fact a benefit and public good, The Verge reported on Friday.

Apple was specifically responding to a bill designed to five government easy access to the devices and data of criminals during investigations.

The tech giant said it takes technology’s role in protecting national security and citizens’s lives extremely seriously.

“Every day, over a trillion transactions occur safely over the internet as a result of encrypted communications,” Apple said in its letter while responding to the Australian Parliament’s Assistance and Access Bill.

Apple
An Apple store in Woodbridge, Virginia. (VOA)

“Criminals and terrorists who want to infiltrate systems and disrupt sensitive networks may start their attacks by accessing just one person’s smartphone. In the face of these threats, this is no time to weaken encryption.”

While Apple was not outright condemning the bill, it, however, attempted to make the case that “the draft legislation remains dangerously ambiguous with respect to encryption and security” The Verge report added.

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Apple and the US Federal Bureau of Investigation engaged in a showdown in 2016 over the iPhone used by an assailant in the San Bernardino terror attack.

The FBI had to seek third-party help after Apple refused to assist the investigating agency unlock the phone. (IANS)

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