Friday March 22, 2019
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Watching High-Spirited Videos Online Could Make You Happier

They found evidence that there is both a sustained and an immediate effect that leads to YouTuber emotion correlating with audience emotion

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Watching peppy videos online could make you happier, Pixabay

Watching high-spirited videos on YouTube after a long day at work could pep you up a bit as researchers have found that people mirror the emotions of those they see online.

When a YouTuber posts a video with a generally positive tone, the audience reacts with heightened positive emotions and the same is true for other emotional states, said the study published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

“Our research is a reminder that the people we encounter online influence our everyday emotions — being exposed to happy (or angry) people can make us more happy (or angry) ourselves,” said lead author of the study Hannes Rosenbusch from Tilburg University in the Netherlands.

 For the study, the researchers examined over 2,000 video blogs, or vlogs on YouTube.

Vloggers share emotions and experiences in their videos, providing a reliable source of data.

The researchers focused on studying more popular vlogs, with a minimum of 10,000 subscribers. Some of their sample vlogs had millions of subscribers.

Representational image. Pixabay

To measure if people watching vlogs experienced emotional contagion or homophily, the team studied words and emotions expressed by the vloggers and analyzed the emotional language of online comments.

Being affected by others’ emotions is known as “contagion” and “homophily” refers to the tendency of people seeking out others like themselves.

The researchers modelled the effect of both immediate (contagion) and sustained (homophily) emotional reactions.

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They found evidence that there is both a sustained and an immediate effect that leads to YouTuber emotion correlating with audience emotion.

“Our social life might move more and more to the online sphere, but our emotions and the way we behave towards one another will always be steered by basic psychological processes,” Rosenbusch said. (IANS)

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To Avoid Copyright Violations Youtubers Try Funny Ways to Make Videos

There has not been any comment on the subject from Google or YouTube as of now

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youtubers
Recently, several YouTubers have landed in copyright violations by picking up short clips from platforms like TikTok that contained music from labels like Sony and Warner. Pixabay

In an attempt to combat copyright-related issues on YouTube, creators have started adding self-sung songs behind funny clips they wish to shoot a reaction video on.

Reaction videos, typically monetised, are a huge part of the current YouTube culture where people lift clips and trailers and film their reactions to what is happening on-screen.

Recently, several YouTubers have landed in copyright violations by picking up short clips from platforms like TikTok that contained music from labels like Sony and Warner.

“To work around that, creators like Danny Gonzalez and Kurtis Conner have started replacing the music with their own singing, half-heartedly singing famous songs while the corresponding TikTok video plays on screen,” The Verge reported on Sunday.

Youtube
Reaction videos, typically monetised, are a huge part of the current YouTube culture where people lift clips and trailers and film their reactions to what is happening on-screen. Pixabay

Creators have devised the humorous method so that major labels would not be able to claim copyright infringement, or at least that the singing would not trigger YouTube’s automated system for finding copyrighted content.

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However, the issue remains that YouTube content creators are still trying out ways to monetise videos that include content they did not create themselves.

“It’s a little painful to hear, but ultimately a very fun loophole in the copyright system that YouTube has to enforce,” the report added.

There has not been any comment on the subject from Google or YouTube as of now.  (IANS)