Thursday January 17, 2019
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Watching High-Spirited Videos Online Could Make You Happier

They found evidence that there is both a sustained and an immediate effect that leads to YouTuber emotion correlating with audience emotion

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Watching peppy videos online could make you happier, Pixabay

Watching high-spirited videos on YouTube after a long day at work could pep you up a bit as researchers have found that people mirror the emotions of those they see online.

When a YouTuber posts a video with a generally positive tone, the audience reacts with heightened positive emotions and the same is true for other emotional states, said the study published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

“Our research is a reminder that the people we encounter online influence our everyday emotions — being exposed to happy (or angry) people can make us more happy (or angry) ourselves,” said lead author of the study Hannes Rosenbusch from Tilburg University in the Netherlands.

 For the study, the researchers examined over 2,000 video blogs, or vlogs on YouTube.

Vloggers share emotions and experiences in their videos, providing a reliable source of data.

The researchers focused on studying more popular vlogs, with a minimum of 10,000 subscribers. Some of their sample vlogs had millions of subscribers.

Representational image. Pixabay

To measure if people watching vlogs experienced emotional contagion or homophily, the team studied words and emotions expressed by the vloggers and analyzed the emotional language of online comments.

Being affected by others’ emotions is known as “contagion” and “homophily” refers to the tendency of people seeking out others like themselves.

The researchers modelled the effect of both immediate (contagion) and sustained (homophily) emotional reactions.

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They found evidence that there is both a sustained and an immediate effect that leads to YouTuber emotion correlating with audience emotion.

“Our social life might move more and more to the online sphere, but our emotions and the way we behave towards one another will always be steered by basic psychological processes,” Rosenbusch said. (IANS)

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YouTube Bans Dangerous, Harmful Pranks From its Platform

Recently, a challenge inspired by a scene in Netflix show Birdbox involved carrying out activities - such as driving - while blindfolded. At least one person is known to have crashed as a result

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YouTube
YouTube bans dangerous, harmful pranks. Pixabay

YouTube videos that depict dangerous or emotionally distressing “pranks” have been banned from the platform.

The move comes in response to the so-called “challenges” that have sometimes resulted in death or injury, the BBC reported on Wednesday.

The Google-owned video sharing site said such material had “no place on YouTube”.

But enforcing its new rules on pranks may prove to be difficult, given ambiguity over what may or may not be considered harmful.

“YouTube is home to many beloved viral challenges and pranks,” a message added to the site’s FAQ section read.

“That said, we’ve always had policies to make sure what’s funny doesn’t cross the line into also being harmful or dangerous.

YouTube
YouTube. Pixabay

“Our Community Guidelines prohibit content that encourages dangerous activities that are likely to result in serious harm.”

From now on, the site said it would not allow videos that featured “pranks with a perceived danger of serious physical injury”.

This includes pranks where someone is tricked into thinking they are in severe danger, even if no real threat existed.

Also Read- Now Comes an Assistive Robot To Help Elderly Live Independently

The site added: “We also don’t allow pranks that cause children to experience severe emotional distress, meaning something so bad that it could leave the child traumatized for life.”

Recently, a challenge inspired by a scene in Netflix show Birdbox involved carrying out activities – such as driving – while blindfolded. At least one person is known to have crashed as a result. (IANS)