Monday February 18, 2019

Higher BMI Linked with Asthma Risk, says Study

The participants' weight and height were measured multiple times during the first three years of life

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BMI, Asthma Risk
High BMI in early life is linked to asthma risk later: Study. Pixabay

The growth of children in the first three years of their life affects the development of their lungs and the risk of asthma at 10 years of age, says a study.

According to recent studies, excessive weight gain in the first years of life can be associated with lower lung function and a higher risk of childhood asthma.

The new study, led by Erasmus University in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, showed that the infants with the highest weight gain velocity and body mass index had lower lung function at 10 years of age.

Specifically, these children had a lower function related to the smaller airways in relation to their total lung volume.

The study also found that “the later the children reached their peak body mass index, the better their lung function and, in the case of boys, the lower the risk of asthma”, said lead author Maribel Casas, researcher at the varsity.

BMI, Asthma Risk
Asthma Medicine, Pixabay

“These results confirm that early childhood growth plays an important role in lung development,” Casas added.

Although no relationship between height and weight growth and the risk of asthma was observed, this disproportionate development of lung function could be a risk factor for the development of respiratory disease, the researchers said.

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For the study, published in the journal Thorax, the team tracked 4,435 children in the Netherlands from birth until 10 years of age.

The participants’ weight and height were measured multiple times during the first three years of life.

The team examined whether early childhood growth patterns — ascertained by taking repeated weight and height measurements during the first three years of the child’s life — affected respiratory health at the age of 10 years. (IANS)

Next Story

Lower BMI in Children Can Raise Risk of Eating Order

For the study, the researchers analysed 1,502 individuals

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The research has found that family dinners are a great way to improve the dietary intake of the whole family, regardless of how well the family functions together. Pixabay

Is your toddler underweight or malnourished? If yes, he or she could be at risk for developing anorexia nervosa in adolescence, warns a new study.

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that makes people obsessive about their weight.

The findings, led by researchers from the University of North Carolina in the US, showed that persistent low body mass index (BMI) in children — starting as young as age two for boys and four for girls — may be a risk factor for developing anorexia nervosa in adolescence.

In addition, a persistent high BMI in childhood may be a risk factor for later development of bulimia nervosa characterised by binge-eating and purging disorder.

According to Zeynep Yilmaz, Assistant Professor, although eating disorders are psychiatric in nature, the study highlights the need to also consider metabolic risk factors alongside psychological, sociocultural, and environmental components.

Health
Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that makes people obsessive about their weight. Pixabay

“The differences in childhood body weight of adolescents who later developed eating disorders started to emerge at a very early age — way too early to be caused by social pressures to be thin or dieting,” Yilmaz said.

The reason could be that underlying metabolic factors that are driven by genetics, could predispose these individuals to weight dysregulation, said the study, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

There is a need to develop early detection tools that could be used as part of routine checks by all paediatricians.

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Indeed, the earlier the problem is identified, the better it can be managed, especially if support is provided to the family as a whole, rather than just the individual, the researchers suggested.

For the study, the researchers analysed 1,502 individuals. (IANS)