Thursday April 25, 2019

Higher BMI Linked with Asthma Risk, says Study

The participants' weight and height were measured multiple times during the first three years of life

0
//
BMI, Asthma Risk
High BMI in early life is linked to asthma risk later: Study. Pixabay

The growth of children in the first three years of their life affects the development of their lungs and the risk of asthma at 10 years of age, says a study.

According to recent studies, excessive weight gain in the first years of life can be associated with lower lung function and a higher risk of childhood asthma.

The new study, led by Erasmus University in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, showed that the infants with the highest weight gain velocity and body mass index had lower lung function at 10 years of age.

Specifically, these children had a lower function related to the smaller airways in relation to their total lung volume.

The study also found that “the later the children reached their peak body mass index, the better their lung function and, in the case of boys, the lower the risk of asthma”, said lead author Maribel Casas, researcher at the varsity.

BMI, Asthma Risk
Asthma Medicine, Pixabay

“These results confirm that early childhood growth plays an important role in lung development,” Casas added.

Although no relationship between height and weight growth and the risk of asthma was observed, this disproportionate development of lung function could be a risk factor for the development of respiratory disease, the researchers said.

You May Also Like to Read About Apple’s Self Driven car Accident- Apple Inc’s Self- Driven Car Encounters Its First Accident

For the study, published in the journal Thorax, the team tracked 4,435 children in the Netherlands from birth until 10 years of age.

The participants’ weight and height were measured multiple times during the first three years of life.

The team examined whether early childhood growth patterns — ascertained by taking repeated weight and height measurements during the first three years of the child’s life — affected respiratory health at the age of 10 years. (IANS)

Next Story

Car Pollution: The Cause of Asthma Among Over 350,000 Children in India

South Korea (31 per cent) had the highest proportion of traffic pollution-attributable childhood asthma incidence. The UK ranked 24th of the 194 countries, the US 25th, China 19th, and India 58th

0
odd even scheme

Traffic pollution caused asthma among 350,000 children in India, the second largest after China, in 2015, finds a Lancet study that analysed 194 countries.

The study, published in the Lancet Planetary Health, found that the largest number of cases (760,000) of traffic pollution-related asthma were in China.

It could be because China has the second largest population of children and the third highest concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), which is an indicator of traffic pollution.

India had the next largest number of cases (350,000) due to its large population of children, said researchers from the George Washington University in the US. The US (240,000), Indonesia (160,000) and Brazil (140,000) had the next largest burdens.

“Our findings suggest millions of new cases of paediatric asthma could be prevented in cities around the world by reducing air pollution,” said Susan C. Anenberg, Associate Professor at the George Washington University in the US.

Car emissions contribute to global climate change. Pixabay

Globally, the study suggests there are 170 new cases of traffic pollution-related asthma per 100,000 children every year, and 13 per cent of childhood asthma cases diagnosed each year are linked to traffic pollution.

South Korea (31 per cent) had the highest proportion of traffic pollution-attributable childhood asthma incidence. The UK ranked 24th of the 194 countries, the US 25th, China 19th, and India 58th.

Also Read- Twitter Records 45.6 mn Tweets on its Platform as India Polls Begin

India ranks below other countries for this metric because although levels of other pollutants (particularly PM2.5) in the country are among the highest in the world, NO2 levels (between 2010 and 2012) in Indian cities appear to be lower than or comparable with European and US cities, the researchers said.

“Improving access to cleaner forms of transportation, like electric public transport and active commuting by cycling and walking, would not only lower NO2 levels but would also reduce asthma, enhance physical fitness and cut greenhouse gas emissions,” Anenberg said. (IANS)