Tuesday December 10, 2019

Higher BMI (Body Mass Index) Responsible For Higher BP, Even for Non Hypertensives

Overall, the population had a mean BMI of 24.7 and a mean systolic blood pressure of 136.5, which qualifies as stage-I hypertension, according to American Heart Association guidelines

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Blood Pressure
Representational image. Pixabay

If you have a higher body mass index (BMI) then there are chances that you may have increased blood pressure (BP) too, a new study has found.

The findings, published in the journal JAMA Network Open, showed a strong correlation between the degree of obesity and high blood pressure.

Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to several cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

For the study, the research team involved 1.7 million Chinese men and women aged between 35 and 80 years and recorded the participants’ blood pressure from September 2014 to June 2017.

They observed an increase of 0.8 to 1.7 mm Hg (kg/m2) in blood pressure per additional unit of BMI in individuals who were not taking anti-hypertensive medication.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Overall, the population had a mean BMI of 24.7 and a mean systolic blood pressure of 136.5, which qualifies as stage-I hypertension, according to American Heart Association guidelines.

“If trends in overweight and obesity continue in China, the implication of our study is that hypertension, already a major risk factor, is likely to become even more important,” said senior author Harlan Krumholz from Yale University in the US.

“This paper is ringing the bell that the time is now to focus on these risk factors,” he added.

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“The enormous size of the dataset — the result of an unprecedented effort in China — allows us to characterise this relationship between BMI and blood pressure across tens of thousands of subgroups, which simply would not be possible in a smaller study,” said author George Linderman from the varsity.

This research has been supported by grants from the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Innovation Fund for Medical Science, the Ministry of Finance of China and the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China to name a few.  (IANS)

Next Story

You’ll Soon Require to Increase Your Calorie Intake in Order To Remain Healthy

With rising BMI, as observed in Mexico, and increasing height, as seen in the Netherlands, there would be a further increase in calorie intake by more than 18 per cent

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Calorie
In most countries, average body height and body size is increasing and more Calorie Intake is required to maintain the higher weight. Pixabay

As you scramble to buy some onions for your family despite skyrocketing prices, a rising Body Mass Index (BMI) and an increasing body height is leading to a marked increase in global calorie requirements globally, find researchers.

In most countries, average body height and body size is increasing and more needs to be eaten to maintain the higher weight.

Even if both BMI and height were to remain constant, global calorie requirements would still increase by more than 60 per cent by 2100 because of population growth, said the team from the University of Gottingen in Germany in a paper published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The development economist Professor Stephan Klasen and his then doctoral Lutz Depenbusch have designed a scenario to investigate how calorie intake could develop between 2010 and 2100.

Earlier changes in the Netherlands and Mexico were used as a benchmark.

“The developments in these countries are very pronounced,” says Depenbusch, “but they do represent a realistic scenario.”

With rising BMI, as observed in Mexico, and increasing height, as seen in the Netherlands, there would be a further increase in calorie intake by more than 18 per cent.

This means, the increase in global calorie requirements between 2010 and 2100 would be one third larger, reaching a total increase of nearly 80 per cent, said the researchers.

Calorie
As you scramble to buy some onions for your family despite skyrocketing prices, a rising Body Mass Index (BMI) and an increasing body height is leading to a marked increase in global Calorie requirements globally, find researchers. Wikimedia Commons

If global food production does not meet this increased need, this problem will not be controlled by a corresponding decrease in BMI.

While richer people will be able to maintain their eating habits, the poor would suffer greatly from higher prices due to increased demand.

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“This would lead to increased consumption of cheap food, often rich in calories but poor in nutrients,” said Depenbusch.

“As a result, body weight among the poor would continue to rise alongside malnutrition and poorer health outcomes.” (IANS)