Wednesday March 20, 2019

Higher BMI (Body Mass Index) Responsible For Higher BP, Even for Non Hypertensives

Overall, the population had a mean BMI of 24.7 and a mean systolic blood pressure of 136.5, which qualifies as stage-I hypertension, according to American Heart Association guidelines

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Blood Pressure
Representational image. Pixabay

If you have a higher body mass index (BMI) then there are chances that you may have increased blood pressure (BP) too, a new study has found.

The findings, published in the journal JAMA Network Open, showed a strong correlation between the degree of obesity and high blood pressure.

Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to several cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

For the study, the research team involved 1.7 million Chinese men and women aged between 35 and 80 years and recorded the participants’ blood pressure from September 2014 to June 2017.

They observed an increase of 0.8 to 1.7 mm Hg (kg/m2) in blood pressure per additional unit of BMI in individuals who were not taking anti-hypertensive medication.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Overall, the population had a mean BMI of 24.7 and a mean systolic blood pressure of 136.5, which qualifies as stage-I hypertension, according to American Heart Association guidelines.

“If trends in overweight and obesity continue in China, the implication of our study is that hypertension, already a major risk factor, is likely to become even more important,” said senior author Harlan Krumholz from Yale University in the US.

“This paper is ringing the bell that the time is now to focus on these risk factors,” he added.

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“The enormous size of the dataset — the result of an unprecedented effort in China — allows us to characterise this relationship between BMI and blood pressure across tens of thousands of subgroups, which simply would not be possible in a smaller study,” said author George Linderman from the varsity.

This research has been supported by grants from the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Innovation Fund for Medical Science, the Ministry of Finance of China and the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China to name a few.  (IANS)

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Lower BMI in Children Can Raise Risk of Eating Order

For the study, the researchers analysed 1,502 individuals

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child
The research has found that family dinners are a great way to improve the dietary intake of the whole family, regardless of how well the family functions together. Pixabay

Is your toddler underweight or malnourished? If yes, he or she could be at risk for developing anorexia nervosa in adolescence, warns a new study.

Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that makes people obsessive about their weight.

The findings, led by researchers from the University of North Carolina in the US, showed that persistent low body mass index (BMI) in children — starting as young as age two for boys and four for girls — may be a risk factor for developing anorexia nervosa in adolescence.

In addition, a persistent high BMI in childhood may be a risk factor for later development of bulimia nervosa characterised by binge-eating and purging disorder.

According to Zeynep Yilmaz, Assistant Professor, although eating disorders are psychiatric in nature, the study highlights the need to also consider metabolic risk factors alongside psychological, sociocultural, and environmental components.

Health
Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that makes people obsessive about their weight. Pixabay

“The differences in childhood body weight of adolescents who later developed eating disorders started to emerge at a very early age — way too early to be caused by social pressures to be thin or dieting,” Yilmaz said.

The reason could be that underlying metabolic factors that are driven by genetics, could predispose these individuals to weight dysregulation, said the study, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

There is a need to develop early detection tools that could be used as part of routine checks by all paediatricians.

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Indeed, the earlier the problem is identified, the better it can be managed, especially if support is provided to the family as a whole, rather than just the individual, the researchers suggested.

For the study, the researchers analysed 1,502 individuals. (IANS)