Tuesday November 20, 2018

Higher BMI (Body Mass Index) Responsible For Higher BP, Even for Non Hypertensives

Overall, the population had a mean BMI of 24.7 and a mean systolic blood pressure of 136.5, which qualifies as stage-I hypertension, according to American Heart Association guidelines

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Representational image. Pixabay
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If you have a higher body mass index (BMI) then there are chances that you may have increased blood pressure (BP) too, a new study has found.

The findings, published in the journal JAMA Network Open, showed a strong correlation between the degree of obesity and high blood pressure.

Uncontrolled high blood pressure can lead to several cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

For the study, the research team involved 1.7 million Chinese men and women aged between 35 and 80 years and recorded the participants’ blood pressure from September 2014 to June 2017.

They observed an increase of 0.8 to 1.7 mm Hg (kg/m2) in blood pressure per additional unit of BMI in individuals who were not taking anti-hypertensive medication.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Overall, the population had a mean BMI of 24.7 and a mean systolic blood pressure of 136.5, which qualifies as stage-I hypertension, according to American Heart Association guidelines.

“If trends in overweight and obesity continue in China, the implication of our study is that hypertension, already a major risk factor, is likely to become even more important,” said senior author Harlan Krumholz from Yale University in the US.

“This paper is ringing the bell that the time is now to focus on these risk factors,” he added.

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“The enormous size of the dataset — the result of an unprecedented effort in China — allows us to characterise this relationship between BMI and blood pressure across tens of thousands of subgroups, which simply would not be possible in a smaller study,” said author George Linderman from the varsity.

This research has been supported by grants from the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences Innovation Fund for Medical Science, the Ministry of Finance of China and the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China to name a few.  (IANS)

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Monitoring BP Through a Smartphone Application is Possible Now, Check it Out Here!

However, the app still needs to be validated in a standard regulatory test

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BP
This iPhone app claims to accurately monitor BP. Pixabay

Researchers have developed a novel blood pressure (BP) application that can give accurate readings using an iPhone, without requiring any special equipment.

Developed by the Michigan State University researchers, the new “iPhone X” app measures BP via the ‘oscillometric finger pressing method’, or ‘peek and pop’ that enables users looking to open functions and apps with a simple push of their finger.

The user presses her fingertip on both the front camera and screen to increase the external pressure of the underlying artery, while the application measures the resulting variable-amplitude blood volume oscillations via the camera and applied pressure via the strain gauge array under the screen.

The application, featured in the journal Scientific Reports, also visually guides the fingertip placement and actuation and then computes BP from the measurements just like many automatic cuff devices.

When tested, along with a finger cuff device, against a standard cuff device, the app yield indicated that cuff-less and calibration-free BP monitoring may be feasible with many existing and forthcoming smartphones, the researchers said.

“By leveraging optical and force sensors already in smartphones for taking ‘selfies’ and employing ‘peek and pop’, we’ve invented a practical tool to keep tabs on blood pressure,” said lead author Ramakrishna Mukkamala, Professor at MSU.

BP
Representational image. (IANS)

“Such ubiquitous blood pressure monitoring may improve hypertension awareness and control rates, and thereby help reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease and mortality,” he added.

If things keep moving along at the current pace, an app could be available in late 2019, Mukkamala said.

However, the app still needs to be validated in a standard regulatory test.

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“But because no additional hardware is needed, we believe that the app could reach the society faster,” he noted.

While high blood pressure is treatable with lifestyle changes and medication, only around 20 per cent of people with hypertension have their condition under control. This invention gives patients a convenient option and keeping a log of daily measurements would produce an accurate average. (IANS)