Saturday April 20, 2019

Higher BMI in Young Adults May up CVD Risk

The researchers also plan to investigate the relationship between higher BMI and other possible disease mechanisms, such as the abundance and diversity of microbes living in the gut

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Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay

Being overweight as a young adult may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for cardiovascular (CVD) disease in later life, a new study has found.

The findings, published in the journal Circulation, suggests higher body mass index (BMI), among the study participants, resulted in higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

The researchers also found being overweight also caused enlargement of the left ventricle — the heart’s main pumping chamber.

“Our results support efforts to reduce body mass index to within a normal, healthy range from a young age to prevent later heart disease,” said lead author Kaitlin H. Wade from the University of Bristol Medical School in Britain.

Representational image.
Representational image. (IANS)

For the study, the researchers used data on several thousand healthy youth aged between 17 and 21 years who participated in the ongoing Children of the 90s study.

“Thickening of vessel walls is widely considered to be the first sign of atherosclerosis — a disease in which fatty plaques build up within the arteries and lead to heart disease,” Wade said.

“However, our findings suggest that higher BMIs cause changes in the heart structure of the young that may precede changes in blood vessels,” Wade added.

Also Read: Plant-Based Food May Boost Your Heart Health

According to the researchers, this is the first study to explore if higher BMI results in adverse effects on the cardiovascular system in young adults.

The researchers also plan to investigate the relationship between higher BMI and other possible disease mechanisms, such as the abundance and diversity of microbes living in the gut. (IANS)

Next Story

Media Multitasking Can Be Associated With Risk of Obesity

The team measured proactive behaviours of compulsive or inappropriate phone use (like feeling the urge to check phone for messages, while talking to someone) as well as passive behaviours like media-related distractions that interfere with your work.

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The participants underwent an fMRI scan during which researchers measured brain activity, while people were shown a series of appetising but fattening foods' images. Pixabay

Do you keep switching between digital devices like smartphone, tablet and PC? Beware. A study has linked media multitasking to obesity.

The study showed that mindless switching between digital devices could be associated with increased susceptibility to food temptations and lack of self-control, which may cause weight gain.

“Increased exposure to phones, tablets and other portable devices has been one of the most significant changes to our environments in the past few decades, and this occurred during a period in which obesity rates also climbed in many places,” said lead author Richard Lopez, postdoctoral candidate from Rice University in the US.

food
When media multitaskers saw pictures of food, the part of the brain dealing with food temptation became more active, said researchers. Pixabay

The research, published in the journal Brain Imaging and Behaviour, included 132 participants aged 18-23 years.

The team measured proactive behaviours of compulsive or inappropriate phone use (like feeling the urge to check phone for messages, while talking to someone) as well as passive behaviours like media-related distractions that interfere with your work.

The findings showed those with higher scores were associated with higher body mass index (BMI) and greater body fat percentage.

social media
The study showed that mindless switching between digital devices could be associated with increased susceptibility to food temptations and lack of self-control, which may cause weight gain. Pixabay

The participants underwent an fMRI scan during which researchers measured brain activity, while people were shown a series of appetising but fattening foods’ images.

Also Read: Congress To Come Up With “National Clean Air Programme” To Combat The Menace of Air Pollution in India

When media multitaskers saw pictures of food, the part of the brain dealing with food temptation became more active, said researchers.

Lopez said it was important to establish such links given the rising obesity and prevalence of multimedia use. (IANS)