Saturday December 15, 2018

Higher BMI in Young Adults May up CVD Risk

The researchers also plan to investigate the relationship between higher BMI and other possible disease mechanisms, such as the abundance and diversity of microbes living in the gut

0
//
Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Being overweight as a young adult may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for cardiovascular (CVD) disease in later life, a new study has found.

The findings, published in the journal Circulation, suggests higher body mass index (BMI), among the study participants, resulted in higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

The researchers also found being overweight also caused enlargement of the left ventricle — the heart’s main pumping chamber.

“Our results support efforts to reduce body mass index to within a normal, healthy range from a young age to prevent later heart disease,” said lead author Kaitlin H. Wade from the University of Bristol Medical School in Britain.

Representational image.
Representational image. (IANS)

For the study, the researchers used data on several thousand healthy youth aged between 17 and 21 years who participated in the ongoing Children of the 90s study.

“Thickening of vessel walls is widely considered to be the first sign of atherosclerosis — a disease in which fatty plaques build up within the arteries and lead to heart disease,” Wade said.

“However, our findings suggest that higher BMIs cause changes in the heart structure of the young that may precede changes in blood vessels,” Wade added.

Also Read: Plant-Based Food May Boost Your Heart Health

According to the researchers, this is the first study to explore if higher BMI results in adverse effects on the cardiovascular system in young adults.

The researchers also plan to investigate the relationship between higher BMI and other possible disease mechanisms, such as the abundance and diversity of microbes living in the gut. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Regular Sleep in Childhood Leads to Healthy BMI Later

The findings, published in the journal SLEEP, showed that one-third of children consistently adhered to age-appropriate bedtimes for ages five to nine

0
Sleep apnoea is a serious disorder characterized by regular pausing in breathing while sleeping.
Sufficient sleep in childhood may lead to healthy BMI later. Pixabay

Is your child facing trouble in sleeping? If so, parents take note. Regular and sufficient sleep from early childhood may be important for gaining healthy body weight in adolescence, suggests a new study.

The study revealed that those who had no bedtime routine at age nine had shorter self-reported sleep duration and higher body mass index (BMI) at age 15, when compared to those children with age-appropriate bedtimes.

“We think sleep affects physical and mental health, and the ability to learn,” said Orfeu Buxton, Professor from the University of Pennsylvania in the US.

“Parenting practices in childhood affect physical health and BMI in the teenage years. Developing a proper routine in childhood is crucial for the future health of the child,” Buxton added.

Previous studies have shown that poor sleep can affect academic performance, as well as contribute to death and cases of heart disease and stroke.

Rest practices
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, researchers analysed 2,196 children.

The findings, published in the journal SLEEP, showed that one-third of children consistently adhered to age-appropriate bedtimes for ages five to nine.

Also Read- LPG Scheme by Narendra Modi Reduced Household Air Pollution, says Study

Bedtime should provide enough of a “window” for the child to get an appropriate amount of sleep, even if the child does not fall asleep right away, said Buxton.

Future family interventions may need to include parental education about sleep health, particularly focusing on parents with low income and low education, Lee said, adding the need for research in childhood sleep behaviour and weight in later life. (IANS)