Monday February 17, 2020

Higher BMI in Young Adults May up CVD Risk

The researchers also plan to investigate the relationship between higher BMI and other possible disease mechanisms, such as the abundance and diversity of microbes living in the gut

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Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay

Being overweight as a young adult may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for cardiovascular (CVD) disease in later life, a new study has found.

The findings, published in the journal Circulation, suggests higher body mass index (BMI), among the study participants, resulted in higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

The researchers also found being overweight also caused enlargement of the left ventricle — the heart’s main pumping chamber.

“Our results support efforts to reduce body mass index to within a normal, healthy range from a young age to prevent later heart disease,” said lead author Kaitlin H. Wade from the University of Bristol Medical School in Britain.

Representational image.
Representational image. (IANS)

For the study, the researchers used data on several thousand healthy youth aged between 17 and 21 years who participated in the ongoing Children of the 90s study.

“Thickening of vessel walls is widely considered to be the first sign of atherosclerosis — a disease in which fatty plaques build up within the arteries and lead to heart disease,” Wade said.

“However, our findings suggest that higher BMIs cause changes in the heart structure of the young that may precede changes in blood vessels,” Wade added.

Also Read: Plant-Based Food May Boost Your Heart Health

According to the researchers, this is the first study to explore if higher BMI results in adverse effects on the cardiovascular system in young adults.

The researchers also plan to investigate the relationship between higher BMI and other possible disease mechanisms, such as the abundance and diversity of microbes living in the gut. (IANS)

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Here’s why Children Should Avoid Consuming Fast Food

Eating fast food can make kids fat

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fast food
Researchers have found that fast food intake can independently contribute to excess weight gain among children. Pixabay

If you want your children to stay in shape, do not allow them to indulge in burgers and pizzas. Health and lifestyle researchers have found that fast food intake can independently contribute to excess weight gain among children.

Being overweight and obese increases the risk of numerous physical and psychosocial problems during childhood, including fatty liver disease, Type-2 diabetes and depression.

“We now know from our studies and others, that kids who start on the path of extra weight gain during this really important time frame tend to carry it forward into adolescence and adulthood, and this sets them up for major health consequences as they get older,” said first author Jennifer Emond, Assistant Professor at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, US.

“To our knowledge, ours is the first study to follow a cohort over time and to show that fast food, by itself, uniquely contributes to weight gain,” explained Emond.

Previous research has shown that fast food intake is common among children and has suggested that there is an association between fast food consumption and children becoming overweight or obese.

fast food
Findings from this research should be used to inform guidelines and policies that can reduce fast food marketing exposure to children and help support parents who may be struggling to adopt healthier eating behaviours for their kids. Pixabay

But it has not been clear whether eating fast food independently contributes to excess weight gain at such a young age.

In an effort to make this determination, the investigators followed a cohort of more than 500 pre-school age children (ages 3 to 5) and their families in southern New Hampshire for one year.

The height and weight of the children were measured at the beginning and end of the study published in the journal Pediatric Obesity.

Parents reported their children’s fast food intake frequency weekly – from 11 chain fast food restaurants – in six online surveys that were completed at two-month intervals.

The researchers found that at the beginning of the study, about 18 per cent of the children were overweight and nearly 10 per cent were obese.

Importantly, about 8 per cent of the children transitioned to a greater weight status over the one-year period.

Also Read- Ways to Combat Online Body Shaming

“Unlike with past research, we were able to adjust for other factors – such as exercise and screen time – that could possibly explain away this relationship,” Emond said.

“Findings from this research should be used to inform guidelines and policies that can reduce fast food marketing exposure to children and help support parents who may be struggling to adopt healthier eating behaviours for their kids,” she added. (IANS)