Thursday February 21, 2019

Higher BMI in Young Adults May up CVD Risk

The researchers also plan to investigate the relationship between higher BMI and other possible disease mechanisms, such as the abundance and diversity of microbes living in the gut

0
//
Heart Disease
Even low exposure to arsenic, lead may up heart disease risk. Pixabay

Being overweight as a young adult may cause higher blood pressure and thicken heart muscle, setting the stage for cardiovascular (CVD) disease in later life, a new study has found.

The findings, published in the journal Circulation, suggests higher body mass index (BMI), among the study participants, resulted in higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure.

The researchers also found being overweight also caused enlargement of the left ventricle — the heart’s main pumping chamber.

“Our results support efforts to reduce body mass index to within a normal, healthy range from a young age to prevent later heart disease,” said lead author Kaitlin H. Wade from the University of Bristol Medical School in Britain.

Representational image.
Representational image. (IANS)

For the study, the researchers used data on several thousand healthy youth aged between 17 and 21 years who participated in the ongoing Children of the 90s study.

“Thickening of vessel walls is widely considered to be the first sign of atherosclerosis — a disease in which fatty plaques build up within the arteries and lead to heart disease,” Wade said.

“However, our findings suggest that higher BMIs cause changes in the heart structure of the young that may precede changes in blood vessels,” Wade added.

Also Read: Plant-Based Food May Boost Your Heart Health

According to the researchers, this is the first study to explore if higher BMI results in adverse effects on the cardiovascular system in young adults.

The researchers also plan to investigate the relationship between higher BMI and other possible disease mechanisms, such as the abundance and diversity of microbes living in the gut. (IANS)

Next Story

Researchers Identify Genes Causing Obesity

Performing functional studies across other organisms, the team also identified two genes that were associated with significant increase in triglyceride and body fat across species

0
obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

Researchers have identified genetic variants associated with obesity that is central to developing targeted interventions to reduce the risk of chronic illnesses like hypertension, Type-2 diabetes and heart disease.

The team from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found genetic sites that affect human body’s size and shape, including height and obesity. The findings will help understand how genes can predispose certain individuals to obesity.

In the study, published in the journal Nature Genetics, researchers found 24 coding loci (or positions) — 15 common and nine rare — along chromosomes of individuals that predispose to higher waist-to-hip ratio.

Higher values of waist-to-hip ratio are associated with more incidence of diseases associated with obesity.

Obesity can now be cured by our body's natural weighing scales.
Obesity can now be cured by our body’s natural weighing scales.

“For the first time, we were able to examine, on a large scale, how low-frequency and rare variants influence body fat distribution,” said North.

“A better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of body fat distribution may lead to better treatments for obesity and other downstream diseases obesity also impacts, for example Type-2 diabetes and heart disease,” suggested North.

Also Read- PM Narendra Modi Urges Youth to Stay Away From Drug Addiction as it Helps Anti-national Forces

Further analysis revealed pathways and gene sets that influenced not only metabolism but also regulation of body fat tissue, bone growth and adiponectin, a hormone that controls glucose levels and breaks down fat.

Performing functional studies across other organisms, the team also identified two genes that were associated with significant increase in triglyceride and body fat across species. (IANS)