Wednesday April 1, 2020

Higher Poverty Associated with Increased Youth Suicide Risk: Researchers

Further, areas of concentrated poverty may lack infrastructure such as quality schools, sustainable jobs, health care facilities, and mental health resources supporting good health for adults and children, they added

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Suicide
When it comes to identify who is more at suicide risk, scientists have found that physical illness and injury raises the risk of Suicide in men but not women, along with a plethora of other insights into the complex factors that may increase a person's risk of suicide. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that adolescents living in poverty may be at greater risk of suicide, particularly by firearms.

According to the study, suicide in children under age 20 has been increasing in the US, with rates almost doubling over the last decade. Between 2007 to 2016, nearly 21,000 children ages 5-19 years old died by suicide,

The findings, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, show a link between poverty and suicide in children and teens.

“The results were consistent in a step-wise fashion, as poverty increased, so did the rate of suicide,” said study researchers Lois Lee, from Boston Children’s Hospital in the US.

For the results, the researchers grouped the number of suicides into five levels of poverty at the county level ranging from a low of 0-4.9 per cent to greater than 20 per cent.

They learned that the rate of suicides in children and adolescents is 37 per cent higher in counties with the highest levels of poverty – where more than 20 per cent of the population in the county lives below the federal poverty level – compared with suicide rates in the lowest levels of poverty.

In this study, researchers collected information from the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Compressed Mortality File, which includes data on all US deaths, including cause of death.

Suicide
The Suicide rate in cities in 2016 was 13 per cent as compared to the all-India suicide rate of 10.3 per cent. Pixabay

After searching for deaths by suicide, method of suicide, and county where the suicide occurred from 2007-2016, they paired that data with county-level poverty rates from US Census data and poverty estimates from the US Census Bureau Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) Programme.

The findings from this study are similar to research from the CDC that found increases in suicide in youth and young adults ages 10-24 between 2000-2017.

The research also revealed an increased suicide rate from firearms in the more impoverished counties compared to the least.

According to the study, the researchers have seen a rise in the number of children and teens with mental health issues, including suicide attempts or thoughts of suicide, seeking care in the emergency department (ED).

Also Read: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Sued by Girlfriend Lauren’s Brother Over Defamation

The study authors reported that children living in poverty are likely to be exposed to more family turmoil, violence, social isolation, and lack of positive peer-to-peer relationships and may be more likely to have emotional difficulties like depression and anxiety.

Further, areas of concentrated poverty may lack infrastructure such as quality schools, sustainable jobs, health care facilities, and mental health resources supporting good health for adults and children, they added. (IANS)

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Heart Health Guide for All Age Groups

How to maintain heart health, for all ages? Find it out here

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heart age groups
Here are a few common factors that contribute to cardiovascular diseases in all age groups: unhealthy eating, being overweight or obese, physical inactivity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes. smoking/alcohol use, and depression. Pixabay

BY SIDDHI JAIN

Heart diseases are one of the leading causes of ill health and mortality in India, but with some precaution, keeping your heart healthy is not all that difficult. This is a health and lifestyle news.

“Cardiac ailments killed more Indians in 2016 (28 percent) than any other non-communicable disease. Its prevalence is increasing in developing countries like India,” says Dr. Punish Sadana, Principal Consultant, Department of Cardiology, Max Hospital, Dehradun.

Here are a few common factors that contribute to cardiovascular diseases in all age groups: unhealthy eating, being overweight or obese, physical inactivity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes. smoking/alcohol use, and depression.

No matter what your age, everyone can benefit from lifestyle changes.

As per the doctor, you should eat heart-healthy. Choose a healthy eating plan. The foods you eat may decrease your risk of heart disease and stroke. Choose foods low in saturated fat, trans-fat, and sodium. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, fiber-rich whole grains, fish, nuts, legumes, and seeds. In general, red meats such as beef, pork, and lamb, have more saturated fat than chicken or fish, limiting the same. Select low fat dairy products such as Greek yogurt, skimmed milk, and cottage cheese. Limit your sugar intake by drinking sugar-free beverages.

heart age groups
No matter what your age is, everyone can benefit from lifestyle changes. Pixabay

Getting physically active also helps. Adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity per week. This can include brisk walks, swimming, bicycling, jump rope, etc.

 

Kids

  • Limit kids’ screen time. If they spend all their time watching TV/phones and sitting in front of the computers now, they are likely to do the same thing as adults.
  • Schedule a time for meals and stick to it.
  • Get some exercise as a family.
  • Assign active chores to kids.

Adolescents

  • Find a doctor and have regular wellness exams.
  • Don’t smoke and avoid secondhand smoke.
  • Tame your stress. Learning stress management techniques not only benefits your body, but also your quality of life.
heart age groups
With increasing age comes an increased risk for heart disease. Pixabay

Adults

  • Juggling family and career leaves many adults with little time to worry about their hearts. Know your family history. Having a related family member with heart disease increases your risk as well.
  • Attain a healthy weight. You may notice your metabolism slows down in your 40s. Avoid weight gain by following a heart-healthy diet. It is also crucial to get plenty of exercise.
  • Check your blood sugar level.
  • Know the warning signs of a heart attack.

Also Read- Follow This Weekly Workout Routine at Your Home

Elderly

  • With age comes an increased risk for heart disease. Your blood pressure, cholesterol and other heart-related numbers tend to rise. Take care of them. Exercising regularly and eating smaller portions of nutrient-rich foods may help you maintain a healthy weight. (IANS)