Tuesday November 12, 2019

Higher Levels of Stress May Reduce Fertility in Women, says Study

The researchers did not find an association between men's PSS score and the likelihood of conceiving

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Your body may not cope with evening stress: Study. Pixabay

Higher levels of stress can lower conception or fertility in women but it does not affect men, finds a study.

The researchers, from Boston University in the US, found that the association between higher levels of stress and lower levels of conception could be due to decreased intercourse frequency, increased partner stress discordance and higher levels of menstrual cycle irregularity.

“Although this study does not definitely prove that stress causes infertility, it does provide evidence supporting the integration of mental health care in preconception guidance and care,” said Amelia Wesselink, Research Assistant at the varsity.

For the new study, published in American Journal of Epidemiology, the team analysed 4,769 women and 1,272 men who did not have a history of infertility and had not been trying to conceive for more than six menstrual cycles.

The team measured perceived stress using the 10-item version of the stress scale (PSS) to assess how unpredictable, uncontrollable, and overwhelming individuals find their life circumstances.

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Representational image. Pixabay

On average, baseline PSS scores were about 1 point higher among women than men and the average follow-up PSS scores among women remained fairly constant over the 12 months.

The findings revealed that women with PSS scores of at least 25 were 13 per cent less likely to conceive than women with PSS scores under 10.

This association was stronger among women who had been trying to conceive for no more than two menstrual cycles than among women who had been trying for three or more cycles before enrolling. The association was also stronger among women under 35 years.

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The researchers did not find an association between men’s PSS score and the likelihood of conceiving.

However, couples in the study were about 25 per cent less likely to conceive when the man’s PSS score was under 10 and the women’s was 20 or higher, said the researchers. (IANS)

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Risk Of Low BMD Among Women With Less Sleep

Little sleep is linked with risk of having low bone mineral density

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Women with less sleep have a negative impact on their bone health. Pixabay

Getting too little sleep is linked with a higher risk of having low bone mineral density (BMD) and developing osteoporosis, researchers have warned.

Osteoporosis is a disease in which bone weakening increases the risk of a broken bone.

“Our study suggests that sleep may negatively impact bone health, adding to the list of the negative health impacts of poor sleep,” said the study lead author Heather Ochs-Balcom, from the University at Buffalo in the US.

In the study of 11,084 postmenopausal women, those who reported sleeping five hours or less per night had lower BMD at all four sites assessed — whole body, total hip, neck, and spine — compared with women who reported sleeping seven hours per night.

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Women who sleep five hours or less had 22 per cent and 63 per cent higher risks of experiencing low bone mass. Pixabay

After adjustments, women reporting five hours or less per night had 22 per cent and 63 per cent higher risks of experiencing low bone mass and osteoporosis of the hip, respectively.

Similar results were seen with the spine.

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“I hope that it can also serve as a reminder to strive for the recommended seven or more hours of sleep per night for our physical and mental health,” Ochs-Balcom said.

The study was published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. (IANS)