Friday November 15, 2019

Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds

High Vitamin D levels associated with low colon cancer risk

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Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds. Pixabay

Consuming a Vitamin D rich diet is not only beneficial for your bones but can also keep colorectal or colon cancer at bay, a new study shows.

Compared to participants with circulating vitamin D concentrations considered sufficient for bone health, people with deficient concentrations of the vitamin had a 31 per cent higher risk of colon cancer.

Similarly, concentrations above bone health sufficiency were associated with a 22 per cent lower risk. However, risk did not continue to decline at the highest concentrations.

“Currently, health agencies do not recommend vitamin D for the prevention of colorectal cancer,” said Marji L. McCullough, epidemiologist at the American Cancer Society.

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Representational image. Pixabay

“This study adds new information that agencies can use when reviewing evidence for vitamin D guidance and suggests that the concentrations recommended for bone health may be lower than would be optimal for colorectal cancer prevention,” he added.

According to the researchers, optimal vitamin D concentrations for colorectal cancer prevention may be higher than the current National Academy of Medicine recommendations, which are based only on bone health.

The study, published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute, included data from 5,700 colorectal cancer cases and 7,100 controls.

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Further, the association was noticeably stronger in women than men at concentrations above bone health sufficiency, the researchers said.

Vitamin D can be obtained in the diet, particularly from fortified foods, from supplements, and from sun exposure. However, experts recommend vitamin D be obtained through diet whenever possible because excessive ultraviolet radiation is a major risk factor for skin cancer. (IANS)

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Vitamin D Deficiency May Lead to Muscle Weakness: Research

The findings are based on the analysis of data from over 4,000 adults aged 60 years and over, from the English Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA)

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Vitamin D deficiency increased the likelihood of poor muscle function in older adults and confirms the protective effect of physical activity. Pixabay

Vitamin D deficiency may lead to poor skeletal muscle function in adults aged 60 years and over, suggests new research.

Maintaining skeletal muscle function throughout life is a crucial component of successful ageing, in promoting independence, mobility, quality of life and reducing falls and frailty.

While resistance exercise is known to preserve muscle function, there is growing evidence that adequate vitamin D status may also be protective.

“Our results show that vitamin D deficiency increased the likelihood of poor muscle function in older adults and confirms the protective effect of physical activity,” said one of the study authors Maria O’Sullivan, Associate Professor in Nutrition at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland.

“Maintaining muscle function is incredibly important, and often overlooked, in promoting healthy ageing. Addressing this through multimodal approaches that incorporate physical activity, reversing vitamin D deficiency and other modifiable diet and lifestyle components require further investigation,” O’Sullivan said.

The findings are based on the analysis of data from over 4,000 adults aged 60 years and over, from the English Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSA).

The prevalence of muscle weakness was twice as high among older adults with vitamin D deficiency compared with vitamin D adequacy, showed the findings published in the international journal Clinical Interventions in Ageing.

Similarly, impaired “muscle performance” was three times higher in older adults with vitamin D deficiency compared with vitamin D adequacy.

Vitamin D
While resistance exercise is known to preserve muscle function, there is growing evidence that adequate vitamin D status may also be protective. Pixabay

Based on more complex statistical analysis, the study showed that vitamin D deficiency significantly increased the likelihood of impaired muscle strength and performance.

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The study confirmed the associated benefits of physical activity. Older adults partaking in regular moderate physical activity had significantly lower likelihood of poor muscle strength and physical performance. (IANS)