Saturday January 18, 2020

Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds

High Vitamin D levels associated with low colon cancer risk

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Fish oil
Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds. Pixabay

Consuming a Vitamin D rich diet is not only beneficial for your bones but can also keep colorectal or colon cancer at bay, a new study shows.

Compared to participants with circulating vitamin D concentrations considered sufficient for bone health, people with deficient concentrations of the vitamin had a 31 per cent higher risk of colon cancer.

Similarly, concentrations above bone health sufficiency were associated with a 22 per cent lower risk. However, risk did not continue to decline at the highest concentrations.

“Currently, health agencies do not recommend vitamin D for the prevention of colorectal cancer,” said Marji L. McCullough, epidemiologist at the American Cancer Society.

Cancer
Representational image. Pixabay

“This study adds new information that agencies can use when reviewing evidence for vitamin D guidance and suggests that the concentrations recommended for bone health may be lower than would be optimal for colorectal cancer prevention,” he added.

According to the researchers, optimal vitamin D concentrations for colorectal cancer prevention may be higher than the current National Academy of Medicine recommendations, which are based only on bone health.

The study, published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute, included data from 5,700 colorectal cancer cases and 7,100 controls.

Also Read: Outdoor Jobs Carry Different Risks of Skin Cancer

Further, the association was noticeably stronger in women than men at concentrations above bone health sufficiency, the researchers said.

Vitamin D can be obtained in the diet, particularly from fortified foods, from supplements, and from sun exposure. However, experts recommend vitamin D be obtained through diet whenever possible because excessive ultraviolet radiation is a major risk factor for skin cancer. (IANS)

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Here’s Everything you Need to Know About Bone Health

Is your lifestyle affecting your bone health?

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Bone Health
Osteoporosis which means porous bone, is a disease that deteriorates your health. Lifetime Stock

BY PUJA GUPTA

Osteoporosis which means porous bone, is a disease in which the density and quality of the bones deteriorate. As you age, bones become more porous and fragile, which leads to higher risk of fractures. This loss of bone density often occurs silently and progressively.

Osteoporosis is most likely to affect older people, especially women who have already been through menopause. Recent surveys show that women are as much as four times more prone to experience bone loss than men.

Dr. Harish Ghoota, Additional Director-Orthopaedics and Joint Replacement, Fortis Escorts Faridabad underlines few important points regarding bone health and explains how social life can impact it.

Bone Health
Women who have already been through menopause may experience problems related to their bone health. Lifetime Stock

Being physically active is vitally important in preventing major diseases, keeping bones healthy and to avoid or minimise the danger of fractures. In contrast, sedentary behaviour (sitting, lying and screen-time, using little or no energy) has negative effects on our overall health, as also on our bone health.

Very few people are aware that calcium is deposited and withdrawn from bones daily. As we grow, bones continue to build up to about the age of 30. We need to, therefore, develop a healthy bone mass while young and continue to make deposits with age, as after our mid-30s, we begin to slowly lose our bone mass. The risk of fracture in a person is decided by the influence of the environment, nutrition and genes in the course of our lifetime, which contributes to bone structure. Functionally, our bones must be strong enough to supply support for the body, yet be sufficiently flexible and lightweight to permit movement.

A major health threat for an estimated 55 per cent of people 50 years and older is that 1 in 2 women and 1 in 4 men in this age group will have an osteoporosis-related fracture.

The new study – whose findings feature in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, has found a surprising link between poor quality social relationships and the presence of bone loss with women aged 50 and above. Studies show that higher social stress leads to negative social interactions and relationships, which in turn affects our body as well. Weaker bones are also connected to lower levels of social activity. Higher social stress is associated with greater bone mineral loss of the total hip and lumbar spine (lower back) area.

Bone Health
You need to maintain your bone health by avoiding or minimising dangers of fractures. Lifetime Stock

Stress occurs when one is unable to cope with a condition. It could be a combination of psychosocial stress events, including loss of positivity, loss of satisfaction with life, that is a sign of bone loss.

Psychosocial stress is a form of stress that some people experience as a result of significant life events or having lower levels of optimism, life satisfaction, or education. Psychosocial stress may increase fracture risk through degradation of bone mineral density. It also alters bone structure and stimulates bone remodelling through dysregulation of hormone secretion, including cortisol, thyroid hormones, somatotropin, and glucocorticoids.

Who is at risk for osteoporosis?

Age: Men and women above 50, as post 30, bone density drops

Gender: Women over the age of 50, who have the greatest risk of developing osteoporosis.

Body weight: Obesity or higher

Family history of recurrent factures and bone related issues

Who should have a bone mineral density test?

Also Read- Here are Ways to Decorate Your Home This Spring Season

All post-menopausal women who suffer a fracture

All post-menopausal women under age 65 who have one or more additional risk factors and post-menopausal women age 65 and over, regardless of additional risk factors (IANS)