Monday April 22, 2019

Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds

High Vitamin D levels associated with low colon cancer risk

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Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds. Pixabay

Consuming a Vitamin D rich diet is not only beneficial for your bones but can also keep colorectal or colon cancer at bay, a new study shows.

Compared to participants with circulating vitamin D concentrations considered sufficient for bone health, people with deficient concentrations of the vitamin had a 31 per cent higher risk of colon cancer.

Similarly, concentrations above bone health sufficiency were associated with a 22 per cent lower risk. However, risk did not continue to decline at the highest concentrations.

“Currently, health agencies do not recommend vitamin D for the prevention of colorectal cancer,” said Marji L. McCullough, epidemiologist at the American Cancer Society.

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Representational image. Pixabay

“This study adds new information that agencies can use when reviewing evidence for vitamin D guidance and suggests that the concentrations recommended for bone health may be lower than would be optimal for colorectal cancer prevention,” he added.

According to the researchers, optimal vitamin D concentrations for colorectal cancer prevention may be higher than the current National Academy of Medicine recommendations, which are based only on bone health.

The study, published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute, included data from 5,700 colorectal cancer cases and 7,100 controls.

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Further, the association was noticeably stronger in women than men at concentrations above bone health sufficiency, the researchers said.

Vitamin D can be obtained in the diet, particularly from fortified foods, from supplements, and from sun exposure. However, experts recommend vitamin D be obtained through diet whenever possible because excessive ultraviolet radiation is a major risk factor for skin cancer. (IANS)

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High Doses of Vitamin D Can Severely Impact Your Kidney

Calcium levels may get worse before getting better in patients even after cessation of supplements, as vitamin D is fat soluble.

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"Our experience informs us that patients and clinicians should be better informed about the risks regarding the unfettered use of vitamin D," suggested the researchers. Pixabay

In a rare case, a 54-year-old man, after returning from a trip to Southeast Asia where he spent much of his holiday sunbathing, was diagnosed with kidney damage after he took high doses of vitamin D for years.

After referral to a kidney specialist and further testing, it was discovered that the man had been prescribed high doses of vitamin D by a naturopath, who recommended a dose of 8 drops every day, according to a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

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Clinicians must be aware of the risks of vitamin D use to limit complications related to hypercalcemia. Pixabay

Over two-and-a-half-years, the patient, who did not have a history of bone loss or vitamin D deficiency, took 8-12 drops of vitamin D daily, totalling 8,000-12,000 IU.

As a result, he had very high levels of calcium in the blood which left him with significant kidney damage.

The recommended daily allowance of vitamin D is 400-1000 IU, with 800-2000 IU recommended for adults at high-risk of osteoporosis and for older adults.

“Although vitamin D toxicity is rare owing to a large therapeutic range, its widespread availability in various over-the-counter formulations may pose a substantial risk to uninformed patients,” said Bourne Auguste from the University of Toronto.

Clinicians must be aware of the risks of vitamin D use to limit complications related to hypercalcemia.

vitamin D
“Although vitamin D toxicity is rare owing to a large therapeutic range, its widespread availability in various over-the-counter formulations may pose a substantial risk to uninformed patients,” said Bourne Auguste from the University of Toronto. Pixabay

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Calcium levels may get worse before getting better in patients even after cessation of supplements, as vitamin D is fat soluble.

“Our experience informs us that patients and clinicians should be better informed about the risks regarding the unfettered use of vitamin D,” suggested the researchers. (IANS)