Wednesday October 24, 2018

Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds

High Vitamin D levels associated with low colon cancer risk

0
//
22
Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds
Higher Vitamin D Levels Linked to Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk, Study Finds. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Consuming a Vitamin D rich diet is not only beneficial for your bones but can also keep colorectal or colon cancer at bay, a new study shows.

Compared to participants with circulating vitamin D concentrations considered sufficient for bone health, people with deficient concentrations of the vitamin had a 31 per cent higher risk of colon cancer.

Similarly, concentrations above bone health sufficiency were associated with a 22 per cent lower risk. However, risk did not continue to decline at the highest concentrations.

“Currently, health agencies do not recommend vitamin D for the prevention of colorectal cancer,” said Marji L. McCullough, epidemiologist at the American Cancer Society.

Cancer
Representational image. Pixabay

“This study adds new information that agencies can use when reviewing evidence for vitamin D guidance and suggests that the concentrations recommended for bone health may be lower than would be optimal for colorectal cancer prevention,” he added.

According to the researchers, optimal vitamin D concentrations for colorectal cancer prevention may be higher than the current National Academy of Medicine recommendations, which are based only on bone health.

The study, published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute, included data from 5,700 colorectal cancer cases and 7,100 controls.

Also Read: Outdoor Jobs Carry Different Risks of Skin Cancer

Further, the association was noticeably stronger in women than men at concentrations above bone health sufficiency, the researchers said.

Vitamin D can be obtained in the diet, particularly from fortified foods, from supplements, and from sun exposure. However, experts recommend vitamin D be obtained through diet whenever possible because excessive ultraviolet radiation is a major risk factor for skin cancer. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Consuming Cocoa May Improve Vitamin D Intake, Says Study

However, the researchers do not recommend consuming large quantities of chocolates

0
cocoa
Eating cocoa may boost your Vitamin D intake: Study. Pixabay

Love chocolates or other products containing cocoa? A new study has found that foods rich in cocoa, such as cocoa butter, cocoa beans, cocoa powder, dark chocolates, may improve your vitamin D intake.

Vitamin D comes in two types — vitamin D2 and D3. While, vitamin D3 is produced in the human skin through exposure to the sun, the rest is ideally consumed through food such as fatty fish, chicken or eggs.

The findings, published in the journal Food Chemistry, revealed that products containing cocoa are indeed a source of vitamin D2. However, the amount varied greatly from food to food.

“This is not surprising as the cocoa content in white chocolate is significantly lower. It confirms our assumption that cocoa is the source of vitamin D2,” said co-author Gabriele Stangl, Professor from the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg in Germany.

The researchers said that brittle bones and an increased risk of respiratory diseases could be the result of a vitamin D deficiency and cocoa butter and dark chocolate have the highest amount of vitamin D2.

cocoa
A worker holds cocoa beans at SAF CACAO, a export firm in San-Pedro, Ivory Coast, Jan. 29, 2016. VOA

For the study, the research team investigated cocoa and cocoa products to ascertain whether or not it contained the important source of vitamin D.

Cocoa beans were dried after fermentation, placed on mats and exposed to the sun for one to two weeks.

While dark chocolate has a relatively high vitamin D2 content, very little amount of vitamin D was found in white chocolate, the researchers said.

Also Read- Your Facebook Friends May Unintentionally Making You Feel Left Out on Social Platform

However, the researchers do not recommend consuming large quantities of chocolates.

“You would have to eat enormous amounts of chocolate to cover your vitamin D2 requirements. That would be extremely unhealthy because of the high sugar and fat content,” Stangl noted. (IANS)