Saturday November 25, 2017

Hindi publications top circulation in 2015, English occupy a distant second

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New Delhi: Registered publications in India recorded growth of 5.8 percent this year with Hindi publications claiming a combined circulation of over 25 crore followed by English at over six crore, according to the latest annual report of RNI, released here on Tuesday.

Bengali newspaper Ananda Bazar Patrika is ranked the largest circulated daily in the country.

Releasing the Registrar of Newspapers for India (RNI) report, Information and Broadcasting Minister Arun Jaitley said that the media has vastly expanded and there are different angles to the same news.

“The dividing line between news and opinion is becoming very weak. It is time for the print media to strike back,” he said, stressing the old principle was that news is sacred and opinions go on the opinion page, but now there was an explosion of TV channels where discussion is often shrill.

“The viewer looks for the real news without opinions,” Jaitley said, adding that if people get such news, the print media will continue to have a growing readership.

Noting that newspapers with 8.16 percent growth mainly accounted for overall 5.80 percent growth recorded by registered publications, he said magazine journalism was vanishing slowly as alternatives have emerged and there was need to revive it in a new form.

Jaitley said the circulation of print media was coming down globally but India was an exception as “print media here was both regional and national” and the growth in print media may be due to the growth of regional media.

According to Press in India 2014-15, the 59th annual report of RNI, there were 1,05,443 registered publications in total (newspapers category that includes bi and tri-weeklies 14,984; periodicals category that includes weeklies and other periodicals 90,459).

The number of new publications registered in 2014-15 was 5,817 while 34 publications ceased to exist in the fiscal.

The report said three largest circulated dailies were Anand Bazar Patrika, Bengali, (Kolkata edition) 11,78,779 copies, Hindustan Times, English (Delhi edition) 10,18,367, and The Times of India (Delhi edition) 9,72,180.

The Times of India, English (33 editions) was the largest circulated multi-edition daily with 46,30,220 copies per publishing day followed by Dainik Bhaskar, Hindi (34 editions) at 36,94,385.

Press Registrar and RNI S.M. Khan said the annual report is based on the information furnished by the publishers in their online annual statements as required under the Press and Registration of Books Act, 1867 and the ministry was proposing changes in the Act so that de-registration process may be initiated for a publication which does not file returns for three consecutive years.

He said 23,394 publications filled their annual statements online for the annual report of 2014-15.

The report said that top three states having the largest number of publications were Uttar Pradesh (16,130), Maharashtra (14,394) and Delhi (12,177).

In terms of language, Hindi had the largest number of publications at 42,493 followed by English at 13,661 and Marathi at 7,818.

Total circulation of dailies, bi- and tri-weeklies and periodicals was 51,05,21,445 per publishing day – Hindi publications claimed a circulation of 25,77,61,985, and English publications 6,26,62,670. These were followed by Urdu (4,12,73,949), Telugu (2,72,01,064), Marathi (2,39,25,462) and Gujarati (2,37,42,849).

The top three largest-circulated periodicals were – Sunday Times of India, English/weekly (Delhi) 8,85,201 and Sunday Times of India, English/weekly (Mumbai) 8,65,049; Vanitha, Malyalam/ fortnightly (Kottayam) 7,31,750 and Sunday Mumbai Mirror, English/weekly (Mumbai) 7,17,374.

The report said Punjab Kesari (Jalandhar edition) is the largest circulated Hindi daily with 7,42,190 copies on each publishing day followed by Navbharat Times (Delhi Edition) at 6,69,948.

Hindi had the largest number of publications (42,493) followed by English (13,661).(IANS)

(Photo: www.printweek.in)

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Hindi Literature Festival in Delhi all set to give essence of pleasures through artistic culture of Language

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Books, Pixabay

New Delhi, March 18, 2017: A festival celebrating Hindi literature is all set to give youthful groups of onlookers an essence of the many pleasures contained inside the artistic culture of the language.

The festival titled, “Oxford Bookstore Hindi Sahitya Utsav” will be held at Oxford Bookstore here on March 19.

This event will serve as a platform for the people who are looking forward to explore this language through various discussions and intellectual sessions with the experts of hindi language.

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The day-long festival of Hindi writings and Hindi verses will be composed collaboratively with Rajkamal Prakashan samuh and upheld by Vani Prakashan, Hindi Yugum Prakashan, Westland Books, Rajpal and sons, Virtuous publications, and Kunwar Viyogi Remembrance trust.

According to the organisers, Hindi is a very expressive language. “In poetry and songs, it can convey emotions using simple and gentle words. It can also be used for exact and rational reasoning,” they said.

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“The occasion has been conceptualized as a tester’s menu, a sampler, a buffet of the many flavors contained in hindi language & writings, voices, subjects, tones and themes in Hindi,” they added.

The festival will start with an introductory note by Mrinaal Pandey on the topic “Bhasha aur samaj”. That will be followed by interactive sessions by Manisha pandey, Piyush Mishra, Divya Prakash Dubey, Urvashi Butalia many more literary personalities associated with Hindi literature.

It has been divided into sessions comprising readings and recitations on themes as diverse as wit, humour and satire, dissent, modernism, etc. (IANS)

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Journey of Hindi from Dialect “boli’ to Official-National Language ‘rashtrabhasha’

It is officially the country’s first language that is spoken and understood, among all the other Indian languages

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August 27, 2016:

“Language is the armory of the human mind, and at once contains the trophies of its past and the weapons of its future conquests.”
– Samuel Taylor Coleridge

A Language has a paramount importance just not in the terms of exchanging words, but also in terms of sharing  feelings, expressions and beliefs – in the form of words, signs, symbols or sound. It is an important source and means of human communication. But with time, gradual change and development of languages, have become more apparent.

Evolution of any language depends mainly on socialization and interaction. Most interactive languages have evolved rapidly, rather than any isolated language of any particular tribe, that resides distinctly far away, based on the geographical biases. Languages which lack in socialization and interaction, also lack in adapting values and behaviors from other culture as well.

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India is a multi-lingual country, and officially it has 22 languages and Hindi being one of them. It is officially the country’s first language that is spoken and understood by the majority of Indians.

  • Origin of Hindi Language: According to Griysen, Hindi is divided into two- Paschimi Hindi – Shourseni Apbransh and Purvi Hindi – Ardhmagdhi Apbransh. The root of Shourseni Apbhransh is Sanskrit, which came from Aryan language. Shourseni Apbhransh has developed into Khadi Boli, and later to Hindi.

Hindi, being the most interactive and socialized language is coupled with the influence of technology, lifestyle and other languages and culture, is no less far in terms of evolving.

Image source: YouTube
Image source: YouTube

Evolution of Hindi has occurred in numerous forms:

  • Change in writing and speaking: Hindi is written in Devnagri script originated from ‘Bahamani Lipi’, though later in 1935, few corrections in changing of letter’s shapes and use of the verbs took place in “Nagri Lipi Sudhar Samiti” by Kaka Kalelkar. Moreover, nowadays people are more prone to using ‘Bol Ki Bhasha’ or spoken word, rather than, ‘Manak’ or standard Hindi.

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  • Insertion of New Words: Over time, Hindi has been influenced by foreign languages- like Urdu, English, Persian Sanskrit, Persian, Turkish, Arabic, Portuguese, Dravidian Languages and others. Hindi is full of loan words and one will be surprised to know that most of the words that we use in our daily conversation have a foreign origin. Therefore number of words like – Tadbhava (तद्भव/تَدبهَو derived from Sanskrit or Prakrit), Tatsama (तत्सम/تَتسَم identical, derived from Sanskrit), Deshaja (देशज/دیشَج local, derived from Sanskrit).
  • Influence of media: Hindi has got worldwide fame for the influence of media. Social media, film, and television have influenced the writing style of Hindi a lot! People who don’t know how to read or write Hindi to express his feelings in the form of Devnagri script can easily do the same in Roman script. Be it ‘sharyari’ or a film script; use of Roman script in Hindi in nothing new.
  • Popular songs and Advertisements: Exposure of Hindi through songs or adds helps the language to reach out to several people. Nowadays, to make songs appealing and catchy, lyricists and script writers prefer a combination of both Hindi and English and other languages. Due to this, directly or indirectly one comes across the language or gets aware of it. Thus, we can have an idea, how Hindi has evolved with the evolution of time.

– by Riashe Chakraborty from NewsGram. Twitter: @itzriashe

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5 responses to “Journey of Hindi from Dialect “boli’ to Official-National Language ‘rashtrabhasha’”

  1. Even though Hindi has a rich history in India, regional languages are still preferred in their respective region, like, Tamil in Tamil Nadu, Telugu in Andhra Pradesh, Bhojpuri in Bihar and they dominate with greater numbers.

  2. Hindi has no historic connection to India. It was brought by Islamic marauders and promoted by the British. Its the least Indian language. The government is hell bent on the complete elimination of Indian languages out of India and replacing them all with the Pakistani Islamic origin language Hindi. This is also the very reason why radical Islamic party BJP rejected the Indian language petition.

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Debate over Tibet’s freedom lands Young Tibetans in dilemma

Parents in Dharamsala worry that their Hindi-speaking children are too Indian, while new arrivals from Tibet to Dharamsala struggle to fit in

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Dalai Lama. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
– by Ranjuaery Dhadwal 

August 24, 2016:
If Tibet gets independence today, will the new English speaking generation prefer to go to their own country? The question that haunts the older generation.
Especially the generation which came to India with or after Dalai Lama. The generation, which was born in Tibet and fled to India or other parts of the world are worried that the  Tibetan language is only left in few phrases in younger generation’s memory. Now the trend is that more and more Tibetans want their children to remain in India because it has more cultural proximity with Tibet.
Indian Government has opened up Central schools in almost all the Tibetan settlements in India, where Tibetan Language is taught. It’s been more than 60 years since the first wave of Tibetans fled Dharamsala in Himachal Pradesh following a failed uprising against Chinese Communist Party rule and the subsequent brutal military crackdown.
Representational Image: Tibetan Teachings Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Representational Image: Tibetan Teachings. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons
Roughly 85,000 people who first fled Tibet mainly clustered around a central core, built around Dharamsala and the Dalai Lama; in the mountains of India, Nepal, and Bhutan- next to their homeland. Now after three decades, new chapter for Tibetans living outside has emerged. As the prospects of returning to Tibet is diminishing, more and more Tibetans are adopting refugee life in South Asia for the West. Tibetan Government in Exile’s lobbying has arranged for large-scale resettlement programs that bring in hundreds of immigrants every day.

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Dalai Lama says that intermarriage for Tibetans was inevitable but Tibetan language and culture is important and needs to be preserved. Some of them have married Western and Indian women and are having half-Tibetan children. Most of the young Tibetan women too prefer to marry western or Indian people for a settled life.

In an interview Dalai Lama said that had he adopted the path of violence for Tibet’s independence, the Tibetan race would have extinct, rather he is approaching the middle way path for Tibet. Within the community, Tibetan Youth Congress is demanding total independence from China.

The present scenario is that Children born in India or in west are not aware of their culture or traditions. They are basically Americanized or Indianized. Most of them are into higher studies instead of joining the freedom struggle. One of the youngsters in Dharmashala has got his MBA from the University of Oregon, in entrepreneurship. He will decide whether or not to go back to Tibet once it gets independence. At present, he wants to start his own venture. He said, even if they go back to Tibet, they have to start from scratch. Though they show their love for Tibet but there is a disconnect between knowing what you are and actively feeling that way.

Mixed-race Tibetans that came or are coming to India or going to other parts of the world are grappling with issues that how they will fit into the Tibetan cause- how to preserve a sense of connection to a far-flung homeland and how to handle the perception that they are contributing to the community that still feels like it must fight to preserve itself. There is clearly an existencial crisis among these people. They are living in a era when a community, which was recognized for its cultural preservation (even though Beijing has destroyed many of the hallmarks of its culture) these people are struggling to know what exactly constitutes authentic Tibetan-ness.

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Parents in Dharamsala worry that their Hindi-speaking children are too Indian, while new arrivals from Tibet to Dharamsala struggle to fit in. Most of them only say that they have come to learn English. Some of mixed-race Tibetans has struggled to find their footing as well.

Tibetan welfare officer says, Young Tibetans would grow too concerned with money and they would give up on the goal of e returning to the Tibet. The Tibetan government continues to lobby Western governments to take in more of those currently living in South Asian settlements. Tashi  Phuntsok, says that he has been urging Tibetan families to keep up the language with their children and make sure they remember where they came from.

Ex Tibetan Youth Congress President Tseten Norbu says, that it should be the main object of the Youth Congress. This is the only organization which has proximity with young Tibetans. He further mentions that, since the Himchal Government has given voting rights to the Tibetans born here or are half Tibetan, hope of returning to Tibet of this generation is diminishing.

– Ranjuaery is a freelance contributer and can be contacted at ranjuaery@gmail.com

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