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Hindu Temple in Aldenham (UK) Hosts Global Visitors for Largest ‘Hare-Krishna’ celebrations in the world

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Janmashtami is the Hindu festival which celebrates Lord Krishna's Birth
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  • Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna Temple is located in Aldenham, England
  • The temple hosted the celebrations for Hindu Festival Janmashtami
  • It was able to attract 60,000 global visitors

England, August 17, 2017: The Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Temple, situated in England’s Aldenham, has hosted one of the largest ‘Hare-Krishna’ celebrations in the world.

Attracting a crowd of over 60,000 global visitors, the religious festival of Janmashtami was organized by the temple.

Janmashtami is a religious festival of Hindus that celebrates the birth of Lord Krishna. Visitors from across the world had come to saw the religious gathering. The visitors get to witness the Hindu traditions and festivities, explore the temple and learn about Hindu rituals.

ALSO READ: Krishna Janmashtami 2017: Hindus in India and Abroad Gear Up to Celebrate birth of Lord Krishna

The Temple has hosted the biggest celebration outside of India. For the smooth running of the program and fun, more than 1500 volunteers are participating in the grand event.

For children, there will be many activities to keep them engaged on the auspicious day. Activites are planned such as henna, face painting, games, arts, and crafts. Additionally, vegetarian food will be provided to the visitors absolutely free of cost.

Sutapa Das, the local Monk, said to Borehamwood Times, “The festivities communicate the culture and teachings of ancient India in an extremely contemporary way.”

He also said that the fact that thousands of people coming from all over the world, all for one divine truth and purpose, will establish an energy of positivity. This will further inspire all the new guests who want to explore.

Srutidharma Das, the President of the temple, explained that since Janmashtami is one of the biggest religious festivals for Hindus, the festival is celebrated with a lot of enthusiasm.

– prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394


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Archaeological Sites Dating Back Thousands of Years Found Around Britain, Thanks to the Heat

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them.

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A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London. VOA

Britain’s hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the archaeological sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said Wednesday.

Cropmarks — patterns of shading in crops and grass seen most clearly from the air — form faster in hot weather as the fields dry out, making this summer’s heat wave ideal for discovering such sites.

Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest.

Archeology , Neolithic artefacts. england
Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

“We’ve discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England’s history,” said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.

“Each new site is interesting in itself, but the fact we’re finding so many sites over such a large area is filling in a lot of gaps in knowledge about how people lived and farmed and managed the landscape in the past,” he said.

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The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them. While some may be significant enough to merit national protection from development, local authorities or farmers may be left to decide what to do at other sites.

“We’ll hopefully get the help of farmers to help protect some of these undesignated sites,” Grady said. (VOA)