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Hindu Temple in Aldenham (UK) Hosts Global Visitors for Largest ‘Hare-Krishna’ celebrations in the world

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Global Visitors
Janmashtami is the Hindu festival which celebrates Lord Krishna's Birth
  • Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Krishna Temple is located in Aldenham, England
  • The temple hosted the celebrations for Hindu Festival Janmashtami
  • It was able to attract 60,000 global visitors

England, August 17, 2017: The Bhaktivedanta Manor Hare Temple, situated in England’s Aldenham, has hosted one of the largest ‘Hare-Krishna’ celebrations in the world.

Attracting a crowd of over 60,000 global visitors, the religious festival of Janmashtami was organized by the temple.

Janmashtami is a religious festival of Hindus that celebrates the birth of Lord Krishna. Visitors from across the world had come to saw the religious gathering. The visitors get to witness the Hindu traditions and festivities, explore the temple and learn about Hindu rituals.

ALSO READ: Krishna Janmashtami 2017: Hindus in India and Abroad Gear Up to Celebrate birth of Lord Krishna

The Temple has hosted the biggest celebration outside of India. For the smooth running of the program and fun, more than 1500 volunteers are participating in the grand event.

For children, there will be many activities to keep them engaged on the auspicious day. Activites are planned such as henna, face painting, games, arts, and crafts. Additionally, vegetarian food will be provided to the visitors absolutely free of cost.

Sutapa Das, the local Monk, said to Borehamwood Times, “The festivities communicate the culture and teachings of ancient India in an extremely contemporary way.”

He also said that the fact that thousands of people coming from all over the world, all for one divine truth and purpose, will establish an energy of positivity. This will further inspire all the new guests who want to explore.

Srutidharma Das, the President of the temple, explained that since Janmashtami is one of the biggest religious festivals for Hindus, the festival is celebrated with a lot of enthusiasm.

– prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394


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Hindu Icons Which Have Spiritual Significance

These icons have to be treated with extreme respect and should not be touched or removed without the owners consent.

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rangoli
Rangoli, Toran, Aum and Swastika – optional display inside or outside the home. Pixabay

Hindu Council of Australia has compiled a list of Hindu Icons that Hindus may wear on their body and which have spiritual significance. This list has been made to remove confusion among non-Hindus about what is sacred to Hindus.

Hindu Sacraments worn on the body

Hindu icons all year round

bangles
Bangles worn on wrists by women – a cultural item. Pixabay

Scared Hindu icons that can not be removed

  1. Nose stud – essential for girls during puberty, can not be removed for one year.
  2. Yajnopavit/Janaue – essential for boys after their Yajnopavit right of passage, once worn can not be removed and worn again without extensive rituals (not even during swimming lessons)
  3. Sindoor/Mangalsutra – essential for married women. Removal is not permitted while husband is alive.
  4. Choti/Shikha – small hair tail for boys during a right of passage.
  5. Pagdi (Turban, A cloth wrapped around the head) – touching or removing it is disrespectful. It can be removed for a short period in privacy, like when having a shower and must be worn as soon as possible.
  6. Sivalingam (Veera and Adi Shiva people, Lingayat) or other Hindu Gods as pendant in a necklace.

Sacred Hindu icons that can be removed by the wearer

  1. Bindi – optional for women and girls, it can not be removed by others.
  2. Bangles worn on wrists by women – a cultural item
  3. Kondhani – a bracelet made of black thread worn around the waist
  4. Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles
  5. Ear rings/studs for boys and girls in some families
  6. Gem stone on rings for special effects of planets
  7. Hindu Sacraments worn on Special Occasions

    Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles
    Anklets (Pahjeb, Payal) – a metal bracelet worn on ankles. Pixabay
  1. Tulsi Mala – A necklace of Tulsi beads. During special religious observations.
  2. Teeka, Tilak, Vibhuti – essential during Hindu prayers, optional otherwise
  3. Mehendi/henna/turmeric – essential when getting married or when a close family member gets married, optional for married women during karva chauth day. Henna is a fast colour (looks like a emporary tatto) that takes a week or more to fade away
  4. Men are not allowed to cut their hair during Sabramalai month (Mid of November to January 14/15)
  5. Rakhi – a special bracelet worn on special festival day of Rakhi.
  6. Kajal/Surma (dark black eye ointment)
  7. Raksha/mouli – multi colour thread bracelet as a protective icon during special days
  8. Gajra – a flower arrangement by woman at the back of there hair.

Hindu icons in a Hindu home

These icons have to be treated with extreme respect and should not be touched or removed without the owners consent.

  1. Rangoli, Toran, Aum and Swastika – optional display inside or outside the home.
  2. Home shrine

(Originally Published: Hindu Council of Australia)