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Chinese Scientists create ‘Intellectual Suit’ for Wireless Detection and Monitoring of Health Indicators

The suit, via wireless transmission, can send signals to a cellphone, a computer, or even to a doctor's computer a thousand miles away, so a person's health can be monitored anytime and anywhere

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intellectual suit
A new wireless body suit designed by Chinese scientists may be able to monitor temperature, ph level and other health indicators and send the details to mobile devices. Will that mean an end to physical visits to the doctor? Pixabay
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Beijing, October 24, 2017 : A group of Chinese scientists have developed an intellectual suit which are fitted with large-area textile sensors that can detect temperature, ph levels, pressure and other indicators showing the health status of a person.

At the third International Conference on Nanoenergy and Nanosystems in Beijing, Wang Zhonglin, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, introduced the invention, reports Xinhua news agency.

The intellectual suit, via wireless transmission, can send signals to a cellphone, a computer, or even to a doctor’s computer a thousand miles away, so a person’s health can be monitored anytime and anywhere, said Wang.

The conference, organised by the Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, is one of the most influential in the field of nanoscience and energy.

This year it focused on topics such as nanogenerators, self-powered sensors and systems, piezotronics, piezophototronics, energy storage and self-charging power systems. Over 700 scientists from more than 30 countries attended the conference that ended on Monday.

Wang also mentioned “nano tattoos”. These stickers on the arm, which can be shaped as a pattern much like a tattoo, will be able to administer drugs into a patient’s veins, providing a private and painless way of injection for diabetics.

“Scientists have made prototypes of all these gadgets at the institute’s technopark. They are expected to hit the market in two to three years,” said Wang. (IANS)

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Your body could soon power wearable devices

The study described a small tab (1.5 centimetres long, by one centimetre wide). It delivered a maximum voltage of 124 volts, a maximum current of 10 microamps and a maximum power density of 0.22 millwatts per square centimetre.

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The tab consists of two thin layers of gold, with polydimethylsiloxane (also called PDMS — a silicon-based polymer used in contact lenses, Silly Putty and other products) sandwiched in between. Wikimedia Commons
The tab consists of two thin layers of gold, with polydimethylsiloxane (also called PDMS — a silicon-based polymer used in contact lenses, Silly Putty and other products) sandwiched in between. Wikimedia Commons

Researchers have developed a metallic tab which, when connected to a human body, is capable of generating electricity from bending a finger and other simple movements.

According to a research project led by the University at Buffalo, New York, and Institute of Semiconductors (IoP) at the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS), the tab — a triboelectric nanogenerator — can convert mechanical energy into electrical energy for electronic devices.

“The human body is an abundant source of energy. We thought: ‘Why not harness it to produce our own power?’” said lead author Qiaoqiang Gan, associate professor at the University at Buffalo.

The tab was detailed in the journal Nano Energy. Triboelectric charging occurs when certain materials become electrically charged after coming into contact with a different material. Most everyday static electricity is triboelectric.

Also Read: Scientists Use Pocket-size Device to Map Human Genetic Code

The tab consists of two thin layers of gold, with polydimethylsiloxane (also called PDMS — a silicon-based polymer used in contact lenses, Silly Putty and other products) sandwiched in between.

The tab was detailed in the journal Nano Energy. Wikimedia Commons
The tab was detailed in the journal Nano Energy. Wikimedia Commons

One layer of gold is stretched, causing it to crumple upon release and create what looks like a miniature mountain range. When that force is reapplied, for example, from a finger bending, the motion leads to friction between the gold layers and PDMS.

“This causes electrons to flow back and forth between the gold layers. The more friction, the greater the amount of power is produced,” said Yun Xu, a professor at the IoP.

The study described a small tab (1.5 centimetres long, by one centimetre wide). It delivered a maximum voltage of 124 volts, a maximum current of 10 microamps and a maximum power density of 0.22 millwatts per square centimetre.

Also Read: Mitra: An Indian Robot That Greets You With A ‘Namaste’

That is not enough to quickly charge a smartphone, but it lit 48 red LED lights simultaneously. The team is planning to use larger pieces of gold, which when stretched and folded together are expected to deliver even more electricity.

The researchers are also working on developing a portable battery to store energy produced by the tab. They envision the system serving as a power source for various wearable and self-powered electronic devices. (IANS)

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