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Hirkani Buruj was the name given to this wall in honor of the courageous mother.

BY- JAYA CHOUDHARY

Women have worked valiantly and diligently throughout history to identify themselves as individuals and specialists in their fields. As a consequence, we can now witness courageous women serving and safeguarding our nation more effectively, as well as acting as an inspiration to millions of young girls throughout the world. Here's one such true story of a Hirkani, a valiant woman under the Maratha Empire who is still recognized for her act of heroism.


Hirkani used to reside near the fort of Raigad. Shivaji took control of the fort in 1674 and made it his capital. Climbing this fort, which is situated on a hilltop, was extremely difficult and practically impossible for anyone. A village used to reside at the base of the fort, and all of the fort's daily necessities were transported along the fort's main road. The fort's gates opened in the morning and closed in the evening. Due to security concerns, it was agreed that the gates would not be opened after daybreak at any cost, as any adversary may enter. Hirkani, like the rest of the villagers, used to go to the fort every day to sell milk.

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Hirkani went to the fort to sell milk to the clients like she did every day. However, because her child was sick that day, she arrived late at the fort. She took her time getting to the fort since she came late. As a result, she was unable to return to the departure gate on time. When she returned, she saw that the fort gate had been shut and so she was detained at the gate. Because her child was alone, she pleaded with the soldier to let her go.


Raigad Fort Hirkani's narrative has inspired a number of traditional tales and literature, as well as men and women all throughout IndiaWikimedia commons


The soldier guarding the gate refused to allow her since Shivaji had ordered that the gate be closed after sundown. Hirkani, being the strong mother that she was, couldn't leave her kid alone at night. She made the decision to ascend the slope in the dead of night, and she did it, ultimately reaching her house. When Hirkani returned to the fort gates the next morning, the soldier saw she had several wounds and bruises. Since the soldier had instructed her to stay within the fort the previous night, he was astonished to see her outside the gate. Because an official regulation had been breached, it was determined that she would be presented to Shivaji.

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When Shivaji inquired as to why Hirkani walked outside the fort in the evening, the courageous lady said that her kid was alone at home and she couldn't leave him alone. Shivaji was so moved by Hirkani's bravery that he ordered the erection of a wall at the vertical fall. Hirkani Buruj was the name given to this wall in honor of the courageous mother.

Hirkani's narrative has inspired a number of traditional tales and literature, as well as men and women all throughout India. In 2017, the Pune City Police Headquarters dedicated a multi-purpose facility dubbed 'Hirkani' to its female constables and officers, in honor of her bravery.


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