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NASA launches ‘KalamSat’, Smallest 64 gms weighing Satellite Built by Indian boy Rifath Sharook

History has been made as the smallest satellite, designed and built by an 18 year old Indian teen, has been launched by NASA

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Rifath Sharook and his invention- 'KalamSat' the smallest satellite. Twitter
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  • ‘KalamSat’ is the smallest satellite built by Rifath Sharook, an 18-year-old Indian boy
  • The smallest satellite was launched by NASA on 21 June 2017
  • Rifath Sharook’s invention is also the first time that Indian students’ experiment has been carried out by NASA

June 21, 2017: The smallest satellite in the world, called “KalamSat’, was launched by NASA. The 64 gms weighing satellite was designed and built by Rifath Sharook, an 18-year-old Indian boy.

Sharook, hailing from Pallapati in Tamil Nadu, and his team of six rejoiced as the record was set on Wednesday. His experiment was selected by NASA after he demonstrated his invention in a competition called ‘Cubes in Space’. An organization called ‘Space Kidz India’ funded the satellite. Rafith has been a member of the organization since class 8th.

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To create the satellite, Rafith and team used carbon fiber polymer. KalamSat was able to operate for 12 minutes in microgravity. According to the inventor, the purpose of the satellite is to “demonstrate the performance of 3-D printed carbon fiber.”

Rafith was generous enough to dedicate his record-setting invention after APJ Abdul Kalam, former President, and a remarkable nuclear scientist.

Sharook is a genius scientist. In 2015, he reportedly launched a 1200g helium weather balloon from a ground in Kelmabakkam.

The 64 gram glory has made another record as this is the first time NASA has carried out an experiment by Indian students. Unfortunately, the group could not attend the launch which took place in Wallop’s islands.

Rifath aims to start a private space organization in India.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

 

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InSight Spacecraft of NASA Reaches Halfway to Mars

The camera will take the first image of Elysium Planitia minutes after InSight touches down on Mars in November

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NASA's InSight spacecraft crosses halfway mark to Mars. Pixabay

NASA’s InSight spacecraft that is en route to Mars, has passed the halfway mark to its destination and all its instruments are working well, the US space agency said.

InSight stands for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport.

The spacecraft, which crossed the halfway mark on August 6 is expected to land on Mars on November 26 to study the Red Planet’s deep interior, NASA said in a statement on Monday.

The spacecraft has now covered 277 million km since its launch 107 days ago and in another 98 days, it will travel another 208 million km and touch down in Mars’ Elysium Planitia region.

Earlier the lander’s launch and landing were scheduled around Mars’ closest approach to Earth that occurred on July 31.

However, it was delayed by the Martian storm that has engulfed the Planet and has cut off communication with another NASA robot, the Mars rover Opportunity.

NASA
InSight stands for Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport. (IANS)

NASA engineers used this long travel time to plan, activate and check spacecraft subsystems vital to cruise, landing and surface operations, including the highly sensitive science instruments, the statement said.

The instruments aboard the spacecraft include a seismometer, which will be used to detect quakes on Mars, and a self-hammering probe that will measure the amount of heat escaping from the planet’s interior.

It also has cameras to take a “selfie” of the mission’s equipment.

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“If you are an engineer on InSight, that first glimpse of the heat shield blanket, harness tie-downs and cover bolts is a very reassuring sight as it tells us our Instrument Context Camera is operating perfectly. The next picture we plan to take with this camera will be of the surface of Mars,” said Tom Hoffman, InSight Project Manager from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California.

The camera will take the first image of Elysium Planitia minutes after InSight touches down on Mars in November. (IANS)