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NASA launches ‘KalamSat’, Smallest 64 gms weighing Satellite Built by Indian boy Rifath Sharook

History has been made as the smallest satellite, designed and built by an 18 year old Indian teen, has been launched by NASA

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Smallest Satellite
Rifath Sharook and his invention- 'KalamSat' the smallest satellite. Twitter
  • ‘KalamSat’ is the smallest satellite built by Rifath Sharook, an 18-year-old Indian boy
  • The smallest satellite was launched by NASA on 21 June 2017
  • Rifath Sharook’s invention is also the first time that Indian students’ experiment has been carried out by NASA

June 21, 2017: The smallest satellite in the world, called “KalamSat’, was launched by NASA. The 64 gms weighing satellite was designed and built by Rifath Sharook, an 18-year-old Indian boy.

Sharook, hailing from Pallapati in Tamil Nadu, and his team of six rejoiced as the record was set on Wednesday. His experiment was selected by NASA after he demonstrated his invention in a competition called ‘Cubes in Space’. An organization called ‘Space Kidz India’ funded the satellite. Rafith has been a member of the organization since class 8th.

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To create the satellite, Rafith and team used carbon fiber polymer. KalamSat was able to operate for 12 minutes in microgravity. According to the inventor, the purpose of the satellite is to “demonstrate the performance of 3-D printed carbon fiber.”

Rafith was generous enough to dedicate his record-setting invention after APJ Abdul Kalam, former President, and a remarkable nuclear scientist.

Sharook is a genius scientist. In 2015, he reportedly launched a 1200g helium weather balloon from a ground in Kelmabakkam.

The 64 gram glory has made another record as this is the first time NASA has carried out an experiment by Indian students. Unfortunately, the group could not attend the launch which took place in Wallop’s islands.

Rifath aims to start a private space organization in India.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

 

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Trump Increases NASA Spending by $1.6 Billion With Goal of Returning to Moon

"I am updating my budget to include an additional $1.6 billion so that we can return to Space in a BIG WAY!"

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NASA
NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine talks to employees about the agency's progress toward sending astronauts to the moon and on to Mars during a televised event, Monday, March 11, 2019. VOA

The Trump administration asked Congress on Monday to increase NASA spending next year by an extra $1.6 billion to accommodate the accelerated goal of returning Americans to the surface of the moon by 2024.

The increased funding request, announced by President Donald Trump on Twitter, comes nearly two months after Vice President Mike Pence declared the objective of shortening by four years NASA’s timeline for putting astronauts back on the moon for the first time since 1972.

The proposed increase would bring NASA’s total spending level for the 2020 fiscal year to $22.6 billion. The bulk of the increase is earmarked for research and development for a human lunar landing system, according to a summary provided by NASA.

NASA
“I am updating my budget to include an additional $1.6 billion so that we can return to Space in a BIG WAY!”, says Trump. Pixabay

“Under my Administration, we are restoring @NASA to greatness and we are going back to the Moon, then Mars,” Trump tweeted late on Monday. “I am updating my budget to include an additional $1.6 billion so that we can return to Space in a BIG WAY!” NASA had previously aimed to return crewed spacecraft to the lunar surface by the year 2028, after first putting a “Gateway” station into orbit around the moon by 2024.

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The newly accelerated goal – an endeavor likely to cost tens of billions of dollars – comes as NASA has struggled with the help of private partners to resume human space missions from U.S. soil for the first time since the shuttle program ended in 2011.

The U.S. Apollo program, NASA’s forerunner to the effort at returning humans to Earth’s natural satellite, tallied six manned missions to the moon from 1969 to 1972. So far, only two other nations have conducted controlled “soft” landings on the moon – the former Soviet Union and China. But those were with unmanned robot vehicles. (VOA)