Tuesday March 19, 2019
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NASA launches ‘KalamSat’, Smallest 64 gms weighing Satellite Built by Indian boy Rifath Sharook

History has been made as the smallest satellite, designed and built by an 18 year old Indian teen, has been launched by NASA

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Smallest Satellite
Rifath Sharook and his invention- 'KalamSat' the smallest satellite. Twitter
  • ‘KalamSat’ is the smallest satellite built by Rifath Sharook, an 18-year-old Indian boy
  • The smallest satellite was launched by NASA on 21 June 2017
  • Rifath Sharook’s invention is also the first time that Indian students’ experiment has been carried out by NASA

June 21, 2017: The smallest satellite in the world, called “KalamSat’, was launched by NASA. The 64 gms weighing satellite was designed and built by Rifath Sharook, an 18-year-old Indian boy.

Sharook, hailing from Pallapati in Tamil Nadu, and his team of six rejoiced as the record was set on Wednesday. His experiment was selected by NASA after he demonstrated his invention in a competition called ‘Cubes in Space’. An organization called ‘Space Kidz India’ funded the satellite. Rafith has been a member of the organization since class 8th.

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To create the satellite, Rafith and team used carbon fiber polymer. KalamSat was able to operate for 12 minutes in microgravity. According to the inventor, the purpose of the satellite is to “demonstrate the performance of 3-D printed carbon fiber.”

Rafith was generous enough to dedicate his record-setting invention after APJ Abdul Kalam, former President, and a remarkable nuclear scientist.

Sharook is a genius scientist. In 2015, he reportedly launched a 1200g helium weather balloon from a ground in Kelmabakkam.

The 64 gram glory has made another record as this is the first time NASA has carried out an experiment by Indian students. Unfortunately, the group could not attend the launch which took place in Wallop’s islands.

Rifath aims to start a private space organization in India.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

 

Next Story

NASA Reveals First Person on Mars ‘is Likely to be a Woman’

NASA has come a long way since 1978, when the first six women joined NASA's astronaut corps

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NASA, mars
NASA will also have its first all-female spacewalk at the end of the month, when astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch will get to float around in space. The spacewalk will last about seven hours, according to the US space agency. Pixabay

The first person on Mars is ‘likely to be a woman’, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine has said.

“It’s likely to be a woman, the first next person on the Moon. It’s also true that the first person on Mars is likely to be a woman,” CNN cited Bridenstine as saying on a science and technology radio talk show “Science Friday”.

The NASA administrator did not identify a specific person but said women are at the forefront of the agency’s upcoming plans.

NASA will also have its first all-female spacewalk at the end of the month, when astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch will get to float around in space. The spacewalk will last about seven hours, according to the US space agency.

NASA, mars
NASA has come a long way since 1978, when the first six women joined NASA’s astronaut corps. Currently, women comprise 34 per cent of its active astronauts, according to the agency. Pixabay

“So these are great days. We have the first all-female spacewalk happening this month at the end of March, which is of course, National Women’s Month,” Bridenstine said.

Both McClain and Koch were part of the 2013 astronaut class, half of which were women. They came from the second largest applicant pool NASA has ever received — more than 6,100. The most recent class of flight directors was also 50 per cent women, NASA said.

 

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NASA has come a long way since 1978, when the first six women joined NASA’s astronaut corps. Currently, women comprise 34 per cent of its active astronauts, according to the agency.

“NASA is committed to making sure we have a broad and diverse set of talent and we’re looking forward to the first woman on the moon,” Bridenstine said. (IANS)