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Get Your Home Festive Ready for Dussehra and Diwali!

Can't wait for Dussehra and Diwali? Neither can we! These tips will help you get your house festive-ready!

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From decorating the halls to hosting friends and family, use our tips and tricks for making your home ready for Diwali and Dussehra. Pixabay
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New Delhi, September 9, 2017 : With Dussehra and Diwali round the corner, get your home festive ready with thorough cleaning, cushions in silk, chanderi or zari embroidered fabrics, fresh flowers and scented candles, suggest experts.

Dipti Das, Design Head at interior design and decor online platform HomeLane and interior designer Pramitha Roche, have shared ideas on how you can decorate your home tastefully for Dussehra and Diwali :

  •  Use traditional hand-crafted fabrics and prints. Silks, chanderi, fabrics with batik or block prints and zari embroidery are all the rage. You can also add some traditional carpets.
  •  Use copper and brass crockery when guests come calling.
  • Add mirrors with embellished or copper-toned frames to add a little bling to your interiors.
  •  Instead of painting the whole house, use one prominent wall and paint it with a pretty motif or adorn it with a decal or wall hanging to add to the festive spirit.
  •  Good lighting can easily set the right mood. Light up your home in layers with some ornate lighting fixtures and lamps.
  •  Highlight a wall by painting it in cheerful earthy warm hues like solar yellow, rustic red and emerald green.
  •  Fresh flowers and scented candles are ideal for those who want to keep the decor understated.
  •  Ensure your towels, napkins, table runner and door mats are in the same vibrant shade to keep symmetry going.
  • Bring out the prized centrepieces for your coffee table and dining table. (IANS)

 

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Delhi’s Air Quality Leads To Ban On Trucks And Construction

The measures include a ban on industries using coal and biomass, brick kilns, construction activities and entry of trucks into Delhi.

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India, air pollution, WHO, diwali, Pollution, Delhi, egypt, air quality
A man walks in front of the India Gate shrouded in smog in New Delhi, India. VOA

With no improvement in the air quality of Delhi-NCR even three days after Diwali, the environment authority on Saturday extended the ban on the entry of trucks, construction and polluting industries.

The Supreme Court-appointed Environment Pollution (Prevention and Control) Authority (EPCA) on Saturday ordered the Delhi government to extend the ban which was imposed on November 2.

Pollution, Delhi, egypt, air quality
As pollution levels spike, Delhi and its satellite towns are enveloped in a haze of smog. VOA

The restrictions imposed till November 10 were extended to November 12, by when there will be an improvement in the air quality of Delhi-NCR, as forecast by pollution monitoring agencies.

The restrictions were imposed by the EPCA under the Graded Response Action Plan (GRAP).

Delhi’s air quality started deteriorating a day after Diwali to “severe-plus” or “emergency” due to fireworks and weather conditions like wind speed and dipping mercury, leading to lower dispersion rate of pollutants. The Air Quality Index (AQI) on Saturday was 401 or “severe”.

India, air pollution, WHO, diwali, Pollution, Delhi, egypt, air quality
A bird flies past the Humayun’s Tomb shrouded in smog in New Delhi, India. VOA

“The CPCB-headed task force has informed EPCA that given the prevailing adverse conditions, the following measures will remain until November 12, when it will further review the situation and inform us,” said EPCA Chairman Bhure Lal, in a letter to Delhi Chief Secretary Anshu Prakash, the Delhi Environment Secretary and the Delhi Pollution Control Committee.

Also Read: Delhi’s Pollution Brings Down The Diwali High

The measures include a ban on industries using coal and biomass, brick kilns, construction activities and entry of trucks into Delhi. The restrictions exclude power plants and waste to energy plants. (IANS)