Tuesday July 23, 2019

Home Nutrition Care Keeps Patient Out of Hospital, Found Researchers

It was also found that healthcare costs were reduced by more than $2.3 million or about $1,500 per patient at risk for malnutrition

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congo, UN
FILE - A Congolese boy has his arm measured for malnutrition in a clinic run by medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres in the remote town of Dubie in Congo's southeastern Katanga province, March 18, 2006. VOA

Researchers have found that implementing a nutrition care plan at home for patients at risk for malnutrition had a dramatic impact on helping keep them out of the hospital.

“Our goal as a home healthcare provider is to help patients get back on their feet as quickly as possible and to keep them out of the hospital,” said study lead author Katie Riley from Advocate Aurora Health in the US.

Paying attention to nutrition care helps promote patients’ strength and prevents them from going back to the hospital, which ultimately reduces healthcare costs, she said.

For the study, published in the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, more than 1,500 home health patients were followed for 90 days.

Child
A nurse looks as he weighs a malnourished girl at a malnutrition treatment center in Sanaa, Yemen, Oct. 7, 2018. VOA

The research found that when patients at risk for malnutrition received a comprehensive nutrition care program to aid in their recovery, risk of being hospitalised was significantly reduced by 24 per cent in the first 30 days, nearly 23 per cent after 60 days and 18 per cent after 90 days.

It was also found that healthcare costs were reduced by more than $2.3 million or about $1,500 per patient at risk for malnutrition.

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“Healthcare systems are driven to improve patient care while reducing costs. Our research shows that prioritising nutrition across different settings of care – from hospital to home – can significantly cut costs while improving patients’ health,” said study co-author Suela Sulo. (IANS)

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A Feeling of Safety Most Important for Hospitalized Kids

“Being listened to and understood can give children an added sense of confidence about the situation they find themselves in,” she added

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India, Encephalitis Outbreak, Bihar
Children showing symptoms of encephalitis undergo treatment at Sri Krishna Medical College Hospital in Muzaffarpur, Bihar state, India, June 18, 2019. VOA

A feeling of safety and good night’s sleep are the things that matter the most to sick kids in hospital.

Published in the Journal of Advanced Nursing, the study fills a gap in our understanding of how children are feeling in hospital settings.

For the study, researchers developed the ‘Needs of Children Questionnaire’ (NCQ), the first of its kind to measure children’s self-reported psychosocial, physical and emotional needs in paediatric wards.

“Development of the NCQ is part of an international movement to place children as central to care delivery, which honours the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child,” said Mandie Foster, Professor at the Edith Cowan University in Australia.

The research team assessed 193 school-aged children in paediatric settings in Australia and New Zealand.

Pakistan, HIV Outbreak
FILE – A Pakistani paramedic takes a blood sample from a girl for a HIV test at a state-run hospital in Rato Dero in the district of Larkana of the southern Sindh province, May 9, 2019. VOA

Children’s most important needs were identified as: To know they are safe and will be looked after, to get enough sleep at night, hospital staff listening to them, to have places their parents can go to for food and drinks.

Over 1.7 million Australian children were admitted to hospitals in 2016-17, researchers said, which emphasizes on the importance of this study.

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“As adults, we often make assumptions about children’s needs and wants, but hospitals can be a scary and unfamiliar environment for many children and we shouldn’t assume we know how they are feeling,” Foster said.

“Being listened to and understood can give children an added sense of confidence about the situation they find themselves in,” she added. (IANS)