Thursday November 21, 2019

Home Nutrition Care Keeps Patient Out of Hospital, Found Researchers

It was also found that healthcare costs were reduced by more than $2.3 million or about $1,500 per patient at risk for malnutrition

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FILE - A Congolese boy has his arm measured for malnutrition in a clinic run by medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres in the remote town of Dubie in Congo's southeastern Katanga province, March 18, 2006. VOA

Researchers have found that implementing a nutrition care plan at home for patients at risk for malnutrition had a dramatic impact on helping keep them out of the hospital.

“Our goal as a home healthcare provider is to help patients get back on their feet as quickly as possible and to keep them out of the hospital,” said study lead author Katie Riley from Advocate Aurora Health in the US.

Paying attention to nutrition care helps promote patients’ strength and prevents them from going back to the hospital, which ultimately reduces healthcare costs, she said.

For the study, published in the Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, more than 1,500 home health patients were followed for 90 days.

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A nurse looks as he weighs a malnourished girl at a malnutrition treatment center in Sanaa, Yemen, Oct. 7, 2018. VOA

The research found that when patients at risk for malnutrition received a comprehensive nutrition care program to aid in their recovery, risk of being hospitalised was significantly reduced by 24 per cent in the first 30 days, nearly 23 per cent after 60 days and 18 per cent after 90 days.

It was also found that healthcare costs were reduced by more than $2.3 million or about $1,500 per patient at risk for malnutrition.

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“Healthcare systems are driven to improve patient care while reducing costs. Our research shows that prioritising nutrition across different settings of care – from hospital to home – can significantly cut costs while improving patients’ health,” said study co-author Suela Sulo. (IANS)

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This AI Tool Can Predict Mortality Of Heart Failure Patients

Researchers develop a tool that can predict mortality of heart failure patients

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This artificial intelligence (AI) tool can predict life expectancy in heart failure patients. Pixabay

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) tool to predict life expectancy in heart failure patients.

The machine learning algorithm based on de-identified electronic health, records data of 5,822 hospitalised or ambulatory patients with heart failure at UC San Diego Health in the US.

“We wanted to develop a tool that predicted life expectancy in heart failure patients, there are apps where algorithms are finding out all kinds of things, like products you want to purchase,” said Avi Yagil, Professor at University of California.

“We needed a similar tool to make medical decisions. Predicting mortality is important in patients with heart failure. Current strategies for predicting risk, however, are only modestly successful and can be subjective,” Yagil added.

From this model, a risk score was derived that determined low and high risk of death by identifying eight readily available variables collected for the majority of patients with heart failure:Diastolic blood pressure, Creatinine, Blood urea nitrogen, White blood cell count, Platelets, Albumin and Red blood cell distribution.

Yagil said the newly developed model was able to accurately predict life expectancy 88 per cent of the time and performed substantially better than other popular published models.

“This tool gives us insight, for example, on the probability that a given patient will die from heart failure in the next three months or a year,” said researcher Eric Adler.

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The mortality of a heart failure patient can be predicted. Pixabay

“This is incredibly valuable. It allows us to make informed decisions based on a proven methodology and not have to look into a crystal ball,” he added.

The tool was additionally tested using de-identified patient data from the University of California San Francisco and a data base derived from 11 European medical centers.

“It was successful in those cohorts as well,” said Yagil.

“Being able to repurpose our findings in independent populations is of utmost importance, thus validating our methodology and its results,” Yagil added.

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Researchers said the partnership between physicists and cardiologists was critical to developing a reliable tool and extensive knowledge and experiences from both sides proved synergetic.

The study was published in the European Journal of Heart Failure. (IANS)