Tuesday June 25, 2019

Home-based Weight Management Programs Benefit Kids and Parents: Study

Developing Relationships that Include Values of Eating and Exercise reduces weight gain in kids

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Home, Weight Management
Parents are the most important and influential people in a child's environment. Pixabay

Researchers have found that home-based weight management programmes may be beneficial for both kids as well as parents.

The study, published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behaviour, found that the DRIVE curriculum — Developing Relationships that Include Values of Eating and Exercise — reduces weight gain in kids and also prompts their parents to lose weight.

“Parents are the most important and influential people in a child’s environment,” said study researchers Keely Hawkins and Corby K. Martin from Louisiana State University in the US.

For the study, 16 families were examined based on their child’s obesity risks for over 19 weeks. Kids aged 2-6 years, and with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 75 per cent were enrolled. Families were randomly assigned to receive health information only or DRIVE intervention.

Home, Weight Management
Home-based weight management programmes may be beneficial for both kids as well as parents. Pixabay

Children in the DRIVE intervention sessions – which included establishing regular snack and meal times, reducing screen time, and encouraging physically active play – maintained their body weight with a modest reduction in BMI. Additionally, parents who participated in the DRIVE sessions also decreased their body weight.

But the children who received only health education, significantly increased their body weight and BMI.

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“Our results showed that at the half-way point of the study, children were becoming healthier. Changes in the health of the parents, though, did not happen until the end of the study. This points to the need for long-term, family-based programmes to support behaviour change,” the researchers added. (IANS)

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Here’s How You Can Easily Measure Your Stress Level at Home

The researchers, however, maintained that the test is not an alternative for laboratory tests

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Your body may not cope with evening stress: Study. Pixabay

Feeling stressed out? Take this newly discovered home-test that can easily measure your stress level and tell you whether you need to consult a doctor or not.

The researchers, including one of Indian origin, from the University of Cincinnati have conducted a new test with a device that uses ultra-violet light to measure common stress hormones using sweat, blood, urine or saliva.

“This may not give you all the information, but it tells you whether you need a professional who can take over,” said Andrew Steckl, Professor at the varsity.

The research, published in American Chemical Society Sensors journal, showed that the device measures stress biomarkers in our blood, sweat, urine or saliva.

“It measures not just one biomarker but multiple biomarkers. And it can be applied to different bodily fluids. That’s what’s unique,” Steckl said.

“It is a common belief that mental issues are mainly arising in metro cities owing to the stressful lifestyles. However, the non-metro cities are also in immediate need for access to mental healthcare,” Aparna Mahesh, psychotherapist at Practo, told IANS.
Pixabay

The researchers, however, maintained that the test is not an alternative for laboratory tests.

“This doesn’t replace laboratory tests, but it could tell patients more or less where they are… If you’re able to do the test at home because you’re not feeling well and want to know where you stand, this will tell whether your condition has changed a little or a lot.” Steckl noted.

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Stress is linked to several physical ailments such as diabetes, high blood pressure and neurological or psychological disorders. Understanding how stress affects you individually could be extremely valuable, the researchers said.

“This test has the potential to make a strong commercial device. It would be great to see the research go in that direction,” said Prajokta Ray, the study’s first author and a graduate from the varsity. (IANS)