Friday July 19, 2019

Hour-long afternoon naps may increase risk of diabetes: Study

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London: While taking a short nap may be good for your health, extending it to an hour or more significantly increases risk of developing diabetes, says a new study. “Excessive daytime sleepiness and taking longer naps were associated with increased risk of Type-2 diabetes, with a short nap not increasing this risk,” the study said.

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The research by Tomohide Yamada from University of Tokyo in Japan analysed studies published till November 2014 on the association between daytime sleepiness, nap, and diabetes. After examining over 600 hundred studies including 261,365 people from Asian and Western countries, the research found that excessive daytime sleepiness increased the risk of diabetes by 56 percent, while a longer daytime nap of 60 minutes or more increased the risk by 46 percent. In contrast, a shorter nap (60 mins or less per day) did not increase the risk of diabetes.

The analysis showed there was no effect of napping up to about 40 minutes per day, after which risk began to increase sharply. “Daytime napping might be a consequence of night-time sleep disturbance such as obstructive sleep aponea (OSA), the study noted. Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of taking short naps less than 30 minutes in duration, which help to increase alertness and motor skills. “A short nap finishes before the onset of deep slow-wave sleep.

“Entering deep slow-wave sleep and then failing to complete the normal sleep cycle can result in a phenomenon known as sleep inertia, in which a person feels groggy, disoriented, and even sleepier than before napping” Dr Tomohide Yamada said.

“Although the mechanisms by which a short nap might decrease the risk of diabetes are still unclear, such duration-dependent differences in the effects of sleep might partly explain our findings,” Yamada noted. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Stockholm, Sweden.

(IANS)

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People Who Take Cholesterol-Lowering Statins are at Higher Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes

More than a quarter of middle-aged adults use a cholesterol-lowering drug, according to estimates

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Research, Cholesterol, Diabetes
Statins are a class of drugs that can lower cholesterol and blood pressure, reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke. Pixabay

People who take cholesterol-lowering statins may be at twice the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, says a new study.

Statins are a class of drugs that can lower cholesterol and blood pressure, reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke. More than a quarter of middle-aged adults use a cholesterol-lowering drug, according to estimates.

The study, published in the Diabetes Metabolism Research and Reviews journal, found that statin users had more than double the risk of diagnosis compared to those who didn’t take the drugs. Those who took the cholesterol-lowering drugs for more than two years had more than three times the risk of diabetes.

“The fact that increased duration of statin use was associated with an increased risk of diabetes – something we call a dose-dependent relationship – makes us think that this is likely a causal relationship,” said the study’s lead author Victoria Zigmont, a graduate student at the Ohio State University.

Research, Cholesterol, Diabetes
People who take cholesterol-lowering statins may be at twice the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Pixabay

“Statins are very effective in preventing heart attacks and strokes. I would never recommend that people stop taking the statin they’ve been prescribed based on this study, but it should open up further discussions about diabetes prevention,” Zigmont added.

For the study, the researchers included over 4,000 men and women who did not have diabetes, were candidates for statins based on heart disease risk and had not yet taken the drugs at the start of the study. About 16 per cent of the group – 755 patients – were eventually prescribed statins during the study period.

Researchers also found that statin users were 6.5 percent more likely to have a troublingly high HbA1c value – a routine blood test for diabetes that estimates average blood sugar over several months.

Also Read- Research: Policies Need to be Context-Specific to Improve Women’s Lives in Rural India

“Although statins have clear benefits in appropriate patients, scientists and clinicians should further explore the impact of statins on human metabolism, in particular the interaction between lipid and carbohydrate metabolism,” said co-author Steven Clinton, a Professor at the varsity. (IANS)