Thursday November 14, 2019

Hour-long afternoon naps may increase risk of diabetes: Study

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London: While taking a short nap may be good for your health, extending it to an hour or more significantly increases risk of developing diabetes, says a new study. “Excessive daytime sleepiness and taking longer naps were associated with increased risk of Type-2 diabetes, with a short nap not increasing this risk,” the study said.

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www.express.co.uk

The research by Tomohide Yamada from University of Tokyo in Japan analysed studies published till November 2014 on the association between daytime sleepiness, nap, and diabetes. After examining over 600 hundred studies including 261,365 people from Asian and Western countries, the research found that excessive daytime sleepiness increased the risk of diabetes by 56 percent, while a longer daytime nap of 60 minutes or more increased the risk by 46 percent. In contrast, a shorter nap (60 mins or less per day) did not increase the risk of diabetes.

The analysis showed there was no effect of napping up to about 40 minutes per day, after which risk began to increase sharply. “Daytime napping might be a consequence of night-time sleep disturbance such as obstructive sleep aponea (OSA), the study noted. Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of taking short naps less than 30 minutes in duration, which help to increase alertness and motor skills. “A short nap finishes before the onset of deep slow-wave sleep.

“Entering deep slow-wave sleep and then failing to complete the normal sleep cycle can result in a phenomenon known as sleep inertia, in which a person feels groggy, disoriented, and even sleepier than before napping” Dr Tomohide Yamada said.

“Although the mechanisms by which a short nap might decrease the risk of diabetes are still unclear, such duration-dependent differences in the effects of sleep might partly explain our findings,” Yamada noted. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Stockholm, Sweden.

(IANS)

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Successful Bariatric Surgery Among Older Adults: Study

Weight loss surgeries are proven to be successful for older adults

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Study indicates that older adults treated with bariatric surgery can recover well and have a reduced risk of obesity-related complications. Pixabay

Weight-loss or bariatric surgeries are not usually performed in people above the age of 65. But researchers, including Indian-origin, have now found that these procedures could lead to successful weight loss and better diabetes control in older adults.

The study, presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Brighton, UK, indicates that elderly patients treated with bariatric surgery (gastric bypass or gastric sleeve) can recover well and have a reduced risk of obesity-related complications, including heart disease and diabetes.

“Although based on a small number of patients, our data suggest that successful weight loss and improved diabetes control can be safely achieved with surgery in older patients, which could have real benefits for their longevity and quality of life,” said study researcher Nader Lessan from the Abu Dhabi-based Imperial College London Diabetes Centre.

Lessan and the study’s co-author Saradalekshmi Radha assessed the results of 22 patients who had attended their medical centre and who had undergone weight loss surgery after the age of 65.

Two years after weight-loss surgery, the patients had, on an average, lost 24 per cent of their original body weight.

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Data suggests that successful weight loss and improved diabetes control can be safely achieved with surgery in older adults. Pixabay

In addition, of the 11 patients who had been on insulin to control their type 2 diabetes, four no longer needed it, while for others, the total insulin dose required had significantly decreased.

The only adverse effects reported during the two year period were iron and vitamin D deficiencies, which happen in younger patients too.

Also read- Bariatric Surgery Leads To Nutritional Deficiency

“Management of obesity and diabetes in old age is challenging. There is a lot of scepticism around conducting weight-loss surgery in patients over 65,” Lessan said.

“Our study suggests these procedures could be considered in older adults as an effective intervention to aid weight loss and associated complications.” (IANS)