Saturday February 16, 2019

Hour-long afternoon naps may increase risk of diabetes: Study

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London: While taking a short nap may be good for your health, extending it to an hour or more significantly increases risk of developing diabetes, says a new study. “Excessive daytime sleepiness and taking longer naps were associated with increased risk of Type-2 diabetes, with a short nap not increasing this risk,” the study said.

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www.express.co.uk

The research by Tomohide Yamada from University of Tokyo in Japan analysed studies published till November 2014 on the association between daytime sleepiness, nap, and diabetes. After examining over 600 hundred studies including 261,365 people from Asian and Western countries, the research found that excessive daytime sleepiness increased the risk of diabetes by 56 percent, while a longer daytime nap of 60 minutes or more increased the risk by 46 percent. In contrast, a shorter nap (60 mins or less per day) did not increase the risk of diabetes.

The analysis showed there was no effect of napping up to about 40 minutes per day, after which risk began to increase sharply. “Daytime napping might be a consequence of night-time sleep disturbance such as obstructive sleep aponea (OSA), the study noted. Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of taking short naps less than 30 minutes in duration, which help to increase alertness and motor skills. “A short nap finishes before the onset of deep slow-wave sleep.

“Entering deep slow-wave sleep and then failing to complete the normal sleep cycle can result in a phenomenon known as sleep inertia, in which a person feels groggy, disoriented, and even sleepier than before napping” Dr Tomohide Yamada said.

“Although the mechanisms by which a short nap might decrease the risk of diabetes are still unclear, such duration-dependent differences in the effects of sleep might partly explain our findings,” Yamada noted. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Stockholm, Sweden.

(IANS)

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Adults With Obstructive Sleep At Greater Risk Of Cardiovascular Diseases

Adults with moderate to severe OSA were categorised into four subtypes according to the symptoms they report: disturbed sleep, minimally symptomatic, moderately sleepy and excessively sleepy.

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The increased risk of CVD associated with OSA appears to be driven by patients in the excessively sleepy subtype, according to the researchers.
The increased risk of CVD associated with OSA appears to be driven by patients in the excessively sleepy subtype, according to the researchers. Pixabay

Adults with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), who experience excessive sleepiness while awake are at greater risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) than those who do not experience such symptoms, says a new study.

Sleep apnoea is a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts.

Adults with moderate to severe OSA were categorised into four subtypes according to the symptoms they report: disturbed sleep, minimally symptomatic, moderately sleepy and excessively sleepy.

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Sleep apnoea is a potentially serious sleep disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts. Pixabay

“Multiple studies from our group have shown that patients with moderate to severe OSA throughout the world can be categorised into specific subtypes based on their reported symptoms,” said Diego R. Mazzotti, researcher at the University of Pennsylvania in the US.

“However, until now, it was unclear whether these subtypes had different clinical consequences, especially in regard to future cardiovascular risk,” said Mazzotti.

For the current study, researchers followed for nearly 12 years 1,207 adults, aged 40 or above.

Participants reported symptoms such as difficulty in falling and staying asleep, snoring, fatigue, drowsy driving and daytime sleepiness.

The findings, published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, showed that participants exhibiting the excessively sleepy subtype were more than three times as likely to have been diagnosed with heart failure than the other three subtypes.

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They were about twice as likely to experience a heart attack, heart failure, stroke or cardiovascular death during the follow-up period than the other three subtypes. Pixabay

They were about twice as likely to experience a heart attack, heart failure, stroke or cardiovascular death during the follow-up period than the other three subtypes.

In addition, they were also more likely to experience a new or recurrent cardiovascular event during the follow-up period.

Also Read: Kenya High Court Ruling on Decriminalizing Gay Sex Awaited by LGBT Community

The increased risk of CVD associated with OSA appears to be driven by patients in the excessively sleepy subtype, according to the researchers.

Studies of the cardiovascular benefits of continuous positive airway pressure, or CPAP, treatment for OSA should focus on the excessively sleepy subtype, who are likely to benefit the most from what is considered the gold standard OSA treatment, the team suggested. (IANS)