Tuesday October 15, 2019

Here’s How A Wearable Device Can Regrow Hair On Bald Head

There is good news for people experiencing hair loss as researchers have developed a wearable device that harnesses energy from the wearer

0
//
hair, lifestyle, beauty, baldness, hair fall
The devices are powered by the movement of the wearer, they do not require a bulky battery pack or complicated electronics. Pixabay

There is good news for people experiencing hair loss as researchers have developed a wearable device that harnesses energy from the wearer and delivers gentle electric pulses to stimulate dormant hair follicles and regrow hair.

Because the devices are powered by the movement of the wearer, they do not require a bulky battery pack or complicated electronics.

In fact, they are so low-profile that they could be discreetly worn underneath the crown of an everyday baseball cap.

“I think this will be a very practical solution to hair regeneration,” said one of the researchers Xudong Wang, Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US.

In side-by-side tests on hairless mice, the devices stimulated hair growth just as effectively as two different compounds found in baldness medicines, said the study published in the journal ACS Nano.

hair, lifestyle, beauty, baldness, hair fall
There is good news for people experiencing hair loss as researchers have developed a wearable device. Wikimedia Commons

Based on devices that gather energy from a body’s day-to-day motion, the hair growth technology stimulates the skin with gentle, low-frequency electric pulses, which coax dormant follicles to reactivate hair production.

The devices do not cause hair follicles to sprout anew in smooth skin. Instead they reactivate hair-producing structures that have gone dormant.

That means they could be used as an intervention for people in the early stages of pattern baldness, but they would not bestow cascading tresses to someone who has been as bald as a billiard ball for several years.

ALSO READ: Pessimistic Millennials Across the World Storm Twitter with Retirement Plans

Explaining the hair-growth technology, the researchers said that small devices called nanogenerators passively gather energy from day-to-day movements and then transmit low-frequency pulses of electricity to the skin. That gentle electric stimulation causes dormant follicles to “wake up.”

“Electric stimulations can help many different body functions,” Wang said.

“But before our work there was no really good solution for low-profile devices that provide gentle but effective stimulations,” Wang said. (IANS)

Next Story

How Often You Exercise Depends on Your Personality

If you have not been able to meet your gym goals despite persistant efforts to wake up early or hitting that running session or exercise, blame it on your personality

0
exercise, workout, lifestyle, fitness, personality
Self-reported levels of the trait called 'planfulness' may translate into real world differences in behaviour. Pixabay

If you have not been able to meet your gym goals despite persistent efforts to wake up early or hitting that running session or exercise, blame it on your personality.

According to researchers from University of Oregon, some people seem to be able to more consistently meet their goals than others, but it remained unclear if personality traits encourage individuals to achieve long-term goals in their day-to-day lives.

Conscientiousness has long been tied with healthy behaviours.

Narrowing their focus to “planfulness” — lead researcher Rita M. Ludwig and colleagues Sanjay Srivastava and Elliot T. Berkman, they zeroed in on psychological processes — such as mental flexibility, and a person’s ability to make short-term sacrifices in pursuit of future success that contribute directly to achieving long-term goals.

“There indeed appears to be a certain way of thinking about goals that correlates with long-term progress,” said Ludwig.

“What’s new in this study is that we used an objective measure of goal progress that could be recorded as participants naturally went about their lives: their check-ins at a local gym”.

exercise, workout, lifestyle, fitness, personality
The participants, many of whom were students, provided a written description of their exercise plans and completed measures of self-control and grit. Pixabay

The findings, published in the journal Psychological Science, suggest that self-reported levels of the trait called ‘planfulness’ may translate into real world differences in behaviour.

The team analyzed gym attendance of 282 participants over a 20-week period.

The participants, many of whom were students, provided a written description of their exercise plans and completed measures of self-control and grit.

While all participants experienced a similar decline in gym attendance over the course of each semester, individuals who rated themselves high on “planfulness” items such as “developing a clear plan when I have a goal is important to me” went to the gym more throughout both semesters compared to those who ranked themselves lower on “planfulness”.

ALSO READ: Tinder Becomes the Latest App to Work on its own Streaming Series

“Planfulness” was only significantly associated with the frequency of participants’ gym attendance during the winter semester, possibly due to participants completing their physical activity plan later in the year, the researchers noted.

While there was a small, but significant relationship between participant planfulness and the level of detail in their physical activity plans, descriptiveness was unexpectedly found to have no relationship with gym attendance, Ludwig and colleagues noted.

“It seems logical that people who are successful with their goals would be able to write in detail about their planning process,” said Ludwig.

“We were surprised, then, to find no relationship between people’s goal pursuit behavior and how they wrote about their goals.” (IANS)