Here’s How Megastar Amitabh Bachchan Got His Surname

The actor said he became the first bearer of the surname Bachchan

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Amitabh found the initiative laudable but
Amitabh Bachhan during an interview. Wikimedia Commons

Bollywood megastar Amitabh Bachchan has shared anecdotes about his last name and said that “Bachchan” was his father and legendary poet Harivansh Rai Bachchan’s poetic nom de plume.

The 76-year-old cine icon took to his blog and discuss about the caste system prevalent in ancient India.

“The caste system in the land has been prevalent for centuries, followed diligently by many and now defied by many too, (it is) an ailment that has plagued our society or not by some,” he wrote.

He said that his father was a “strong opposer” of the caste system.

Amitabh found the initiative laudable but "embarrassing" to see all that was displayed on the walls were his portraits.
Actor Amitabh Bachchan. Bollywood Country

“Babuji was born in a Kayasth home and a Srivastav. But his temperament was always against the ailment of caste, his nome de plume, his ‘takhallus’ his pen name he designed as ‘BACHCHAN’. Poets writers of great eminence often designed their names with a nom de plume. So ‘Bachchan’ became my Father’s pen name, his poetic nom de plume but it lent credence of its concept later when I was born, on being admitted to my first School, and being asked by the teachers what surname of this boy was to be filled in the admission form my Mother and father had a quick discussion and it was decided that ‘Bachchan’ would be the family surname,” he wrote.

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The actor said he became the first bearer of the surname Bachchan.

“And it has remained so and shall remain so… My Father… the Bachchan (and) I the proud bearer of this surname,” he wrote. (IANS)

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B-Town Film Stars are Better Social Media Warriors

The filmi social media warriors

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Social Media
Film personalities are most likely to use social media to raise awareness and share opinions. Pixabay

BY VINOD MIRANI

India as a country has been making definitive changes in the way it works. Drastic laws are being planned and huge protests are being launched. As it seems, some vital and long overdue changes are being put in place. There are those who approve and there are the ones who don’t.

Earlier, as it happens in most democracies, these debates and oppositions were limited to Parliament. Yes, some protests did come out in the streets, but then the reasons were often justified.

Now, all sorts of opinions, accusations and oppositions, have started coming up on the outlets of social media, especially Twitter. And most vocal on social media seem to be some film personalities. It is not as if they take a stand against all the wrongdoings that happens around us or in India in general. None of the things they opine affects them directly or indirectly. In fact, when a matter affects the film industry, or one of them personally, they have nothing to say, for or against. A recent example is that of actor Payal Rohtagi. She was arrested and put in jail for nine days because she posted something against erstwhile Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru. There was no protest from the social media coterie against this. Nobody raised the intolerance issue!

They are too busy worrying about national issues to spare time for fellow actors. In my column last week, I wrote about filmstars endorsing brands, and the idea was to convey that they don’t really help sell a product. Same is the case on social media. At times, it is also television where these film people get to air their views. But, television does not care to indulge smalltimers who raise issues, while the print media gives them space as and when. What happens is that, two sides take positions and that finally leads to mudslinging and name-calling.

Kangana Ranaut social media
Kangana Ranaut always takes up the cudgels on social media for issues against the biggest of bosses of the film world. Wikimedia Commons

Protesting is a way of life in a democratic country. However, this is about the film folk airing their opinions they can well avoid.

Suddenly, they become experts on just about everything that happens in the country, though what they demonstrate through their arguments is a total lack of knowledge as well as low IQ level. They always seem to be in a great hurry to react to everything that happens around them, especially what governments do. Never care to verify the details.

What has been observed from the posts of the self-styled experts on all the issues is that, their careers in filmdom are in the doldrums or are limited to an insignificant level. Only social media keeps them in the public eye — not that it amounts to much. Because, whatever little following they enjoy on Twitter never reflects on their box-office draw. Twitter following does not materialise in ticket sales at a cinema.

Talking of ‘following’ on social media, it does not actually reflect popularity. People follow to check on you, to counter you, abuse you or just as a pastime. Talking of ‘following’, can any of these create a following in real life and lead a crusade? The other day, Farhan Akhtar went and joined a protest meet at Mumbai’s August Kranti ground. Now, that is like boarding a running train, a photo-op.

Looks like Twitter has become the hotbed for venting frustrations as well as drawing attention. The print and the electronic media being what they are now, amplify the views posted on social media and takes them further to a larger audience. They plan their evening debates on Twitter posts! The problem with TV and print media is that they have slots to fill and, for that, anything goes.

There were occasions like demonetisation, GST, Article 370 and, now the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA). And, soon as the Bill was passed in both houses of Parliament, the coterie got busy on Twitter. No matter what it was, no matter the details. They had to oppose it! The only place where their posts were acknowledged was on TV debates.

Aamir khan social media
Aamir Khan doesn’t use social media to voice his opinions. Wikimedia Commons

Major stars who matter — like Amitabh Bachchan, Salman Khan, Shah Rukh Khan, Akshay Kumar, Deepika Padukone — are among the most followed twitterati in the country from the film field. Why are none of these crusaders rated among the top? And, the most followed don’t get involved in petty social media posts. They know they can’t indulge in arguments with nonentities who seek attention. They also know there is nothing to defend from these crusaders.

However, there is one person, Kangana Ranaut, who always takes up the cudgels on social media for issues against the biggest of bosses of the film world. According to her, those who don’t react are cowards. That is not really true, every dignified and successful film personality cannot get into an argument with somebody on the basis of his or her posts on social media.

There have been a few dissenting voices from some actors like Aamir Khan and Naseeruddin Shah. Not on Twitter but in public. Shah, who played a man blowing up terrorists in “A Wednesday” in 2008, thought his family was not safe in India. If you read his biography, he is not even a first-generation Indian! Then there was Aamir Khan whose wife feared for her family in India! He lost some ad-assignments as a result. Earlier, he had joined forces with social activist Medha Patkar, suggesting the blocking of Sardar Sarovar Dam. His film, “Fanaa”, and the film’s producer (YRF) paid the price, since the film could not be released in Gujarat. I’m not sure if Aamir even knew the background of the project!

Eventually, he ended up making a fool of himself. He was anchoring a TV serial, “Satyamev Jayate”, based on social issues or injustice done to a common man. May be, he expected his standing up against Sardar Sarovar would further his image as a crusader for the deprived! At times, stars use such public platforms to promote their films. At most times, such ideas backfire.

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Amitabh Bachchan was among the first to take to the Internet when he started writing a blog which he still continues. Writing a blog needs content and a valid topic. Not many who do the rabble-rousing on Twitter will do so because that would need elaborating on what they want to convey. On Twitter, it is easy because there is a limit on characters one needs to use, so no need to use brains.

The irony is those who cry about democracy being in danger and complain about freedom of expression enjoy all the benefits of both — democracy as well as freedom of all kinds. Save for a few, no wonder, filmstars turned crusaders are not taken seriously. (IANS)

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‘Paa’ was a Sort of Landmark for me: Vidya Balan

'Paa' awakened maternal instinct in me, says Vidya Balan

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Vidya Balan
Actress Vidya Balan talks about what 'Paa', the national award-winning film meat to her. Wikimedia Commons

Actress Vidya Balan could not believe that her film “Paa” has completed 10 years since release.

Noting how time flies, Vidya got nostalgic and shared what the National Award-winning film meant to her.

Directed by R. Balki, “Paa” narrated the story of a 12-year-old boy named Auro (played by Amitabh Bachchan), who suffers from a rare genetic disorder called progeria. In the movie, Abhishek Bachchan played the role of Big B’s father while Vidya Balan was seen as his mother.

Actress Vidya Balan
Vidya Balam is currently shooting for a biopic on the late mathematics genius Shakuntala Devi. Wikimedia Commons

Revealing how the film awakened maternal instinct in her , Vidya said: “‘Paa’ was a sort of landmark for me…I have said it many times over that it awakened the maternal instinct in me for the first time ever …and to top that I got to witness the magical transformation of Mr. Bachchan into Auro…And lastly working with Balki was unbelieveable …It was ofcourse a big idea to start with but the process was easy and effortless..and the way he normalized behaviour of all the characters and that too with such little instruction was a huge learning.”

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Vidya is currently busy shooting for a biopic on the late mathematics genius Shakuntala Devi. (IANS)

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Here’s how KBC Affected Big B’s Career

Know How KBC redefined the Bachchan aura

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Amitabh Bachchan
Kaun Banega Crorepati has redefined the career of actor Amitabh Bachchan. Wikimedia Commons

Interesting, how the tagline of “Kaun Banega Crorepati” (KBC) season 11 has virtually defined Amitabh Bachchan as an actor. ‘Adey raho (broadly translates to ‘be persistent) goes the slogan and, come to think of it, its iconic host has literally symbolised the trait through a career of 50 years.

KBC 11 ended this week and, given the recent health scare that the 77-year-old Bollywood icon has had, fans are keeping their fingers crossed in the hope that Big B will overcome all impediments and return on the hot seat next year.

For, even as KBC 11 ended on Friday, speculations took over, mainly triggered off by a cryptic blog entry the veteran actor made a few days ago. “I must retire… the head is thinking something else and the fingers another… it’s a message…,” he wrote on his blog in the early hours of November 27/28, sparking off a deluge of concern among fans.

Was Big B indeed hinting at retirement from cinema and television assignments? Sources close to the actor soon dismissed such notions, saying he simply meant that he was too tired to type – that it had been a long day and the word ‘retire’ alluded to retiring for the day, or going off to sleep.

Still, guesswork has continued. Most fans feel Big B, given his incredible energy will continue shooting for films. Film assignments, after all, would let him work at his own pace. The hectic schedule of a five-day quiz show, however, could be more demanding.

The point to note here is those hectic years mark a significant phase of Big B’s career graph. KBC after all marked his resurrection as an icon and a brad, at a time when he was struggling to reinvent himself as a Bollywood star.

Amitabh Bachchan on KBC
Amitabh Bachchan poses with a contestant on KBC. Wikimedia Commons

The year was 2000. The year before, Amitabh Bachchan had four releases – “Lal Badshah”, “Sooryavansham”, “Hindustan Ki Kasam” and Kohraam”. Each of these tried rehashing Bachchan’s angry young man image to suit his advancing age, and each fared way below expectation. Coming after a 1998 roster that comprised of “Major Saab” (lukewarm at the box-office) and “Bade Miyan Chote Miyan” (where he was clearly outstripped by Govinda in the slapstick stakes), and the dud “Mrityudaata” in 1997, Big B was suddenly looking for a script to reinvent himself in the public eye. His last spate of solo superhits had happened in the early nineties, and his sojourn as an entrepreneur with ABCL has soured.

KBC season one happened around the time. Over a matter of weeks, Big B’s stardom suddenly witnessed rebirth. The angry young man of yore, who had redefined action and drama through the seventies and the eighties, was suddenly redefining home entertainment. KBC’s quizmaster par excellence was a charming gentleman with wisdom to share – far removed from the intense avatar he exuded in his heydays. From the larger-than-life action hero, KBC let Big B become the affable guy who would drop by in you living rooms every evening to serve an engaging spell of wisdom.

If the metamorphosis let Bachchan survive where every other actor of his era faded away long before him, the actor too gave KBC – as well as Indian reality television – a defining course. Not only is KBC regarded a cut above most other shows on television, Bachchan’s style of conducting it set the gold standard of show hosting in India.

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It is a reason why, when the much-younger superstar Shah Rukh Khan tried hosting season three of the show, he could not quite match up to the Bachchan aura.

For the sake of Indian reality TV, we will hope all rumours of Bachchan retiring from television are indeed unfounded. (IANS)