Friday January 19, 2018

Meaning of life according to hinduism “world’s oldest religion”

Hindu text Vedas hold true to their Sanskrit translation- “knowledge” in every aspect of their being, be it knowledge of science or morality

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Hindu Text Vedas. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
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August 25, 2016: Hinduism is believed to be one of the oldest religions on the earth and it has an astonishing amount of knowledge related to astronomy, medicine, mathematics, and literature and much more. Therefore, there is no doubt that Hinduism is the world’s oldest known modern religion.

Hindu text Vedas hold true to their Sanskrit translation- “knowledge” in every aspect of their being, be it knowledge of science or morality. The text does not hesitate to use the example of the smallest of insects to demonstrate the significance of life, and justice for every living creature.

Pashu, a book on compilation of animal tales by Dr Pattnaik. Image source: Flipkart
Pashu, a book on animal tales from Hindu Mythology by Dr Devdutt Pattnaik. Image source: Flipkart

The stories with a message of morality and good virtues through animal examples are abundant in all of the 300 versions of the Vedas, Ramayana, Mahabharata and Puranas. Here are some of the excerpts from “Pashu”, a book compiled by Devdutt Pattanaik, who is an Indian physician turned leadership consultant, mythologist, author and communicator whose works focus largely on the areas of myth, mythology, and also management.

Mahabharata: Mahaprasthanika Parva

After a rule of 36 years, the Pandavas along with Draupadi decided to scale the mountains and enter the Home of the Gods.

“If we have lived virtuous lives, the Gods will let us enter,” declared Yudhishthira, the Pandava king.

A dog, too, had ventured with them. Only Yudhishthira and the dog managed to reach the top of the mountain and stood before the gates.

“Only you can enter, not the dog” proclaimed the Gods.

“But as equal right, since he has come on the same ardours journey and has never faltered in his desire and diligence. The flesh may be different but the soul is the same. If he cannot come in, I will stay out as well,” argued Yudhishthira. 

The Gods were pleased and blessed Yudhishthira for his righteousness. “The dog is ‘dharma’ and you have demonstrated your innate spirituality in recognising that all creatures are the same.”

Ramayana: Little squirrel who helped Lord Rama!

A little squirrel was labouring hard to help Lord Rama’s army built the bridge to cross over to Lanka.

It was laughed at by many others, but lord Rama picked it up and gently stroked it as a gesture of appreciation, and left the marks of his hands as stripes.

Mahabharata: Gandhari’s 100 sons

According to the legends, at the end of the war Gandhari is said to have lamented to Lord Krishna, whom she blamed for the death of her sons. She is said to have asked the Lord the reason for her sufferings. Lord Krishna replied that the law of cause and effect was the reason behind all sufferings.

He explained to her that long back in an earlier life, Gandhari had poured boiling water after cooking rice on the ground outside her kitchen.

An insect had laid hundred eggs there and all of them were killed. The mother insect cursed her that she too would have to endure the deaths of her hundred children. Another legend stated that Gandhari had crushed the eggs of a mother turtle, who cursed her with a similar fate.

Mahabharata: Sumukh and Gunakeshi

Gunakeshi was the daughter of Matali, Indra’s charioteer, who was in love with Samuka, a Naga (snake). Samuka and Gunakeshi couldn’t get married as Garuda, the eagle, was promised one Naga to feed upon each day as a truce so that he does not kill everyone, and Samuka was his next victim.

Indra, after being begged upon by Matili, went to Vishnu for help to save samuka. Vishnu ordered Garuda to spare the Naga boy. Garuda refused and vowed to remain hungry unless samuka was presented to him.

Vishnu placed a hand on Garuda, and  as a result the eagle was unable to fly anymore. He begged Vishnu for mercy, at which Vishnu replied – for that you must show compassion to others—for that is how all life is sustained. The Naga was spared.

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These are small fragments from the ocean of fables and stories that the scriptures encompasses. An endless mine of treasure which rests between closed book covers!

– by Usman Zafar of NewsGram. Twitter: @HalkiSiChuban

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Copyright 2016 NewsGram

  • Jagpreet Kaur Sandhu

    It’s article of wisdom! Pleased to read.

  • Enakshi Roy Chowdhury

    Quite interesting! good facts.

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12 Interesting Facts About Somnath Temple Probably You Didn’t Know

The Somnath Temple is popular due to various legends connected to it. The place is an important pilgrimage and tourist spot.

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Somnath Temple is located in Veraval on the western coast of Gujarat, India. Wikimedia Commons
Somnath Temple is located in Veraval on the western coast of Gujarat, India. Wikimedia Commons
  • Somnath Temple is believed to be the place where Lord Krishna ended his Lila and thereafter left for heavenly abode
  • The first Siva temple at Somanath is believed to have been built at some unknown time in the past
  • Gujarat was raided by Mahmud of Ghazni in 1024, plundering the Somnath temple and breaking its sacred jyotirlinga

Somnath Temple is a specimen of fine architecture of one of the 12 Jyotirlingas Shrines of Shiva. This place is believed to be the place where Lord Krishna ended his Lila and thereafter left for heavenly abode, therefore it is dubbed as Eternal Shrine. This legendary temple has been vandalized numerous times in the history but with the help of some Hindu Kings, the temple was reshaped each time.

Somnath Temple is located in Veraval on the western coast of Gujarat, India. The temple is popular due to various legends connected to it. The place is an important pilgrimage and tourist spot. Lord Shiva has a strong connection here and also known as shrine eternal.

Somnath Temple History

According to popular tradition, the first Siva temple at Somanath is believed to have been built at some unknown time in the past. The second temple has been built at the same site by the “Yadava kings” of Vallabhi around 649 CE. In 725 CE, Al-Junayd, the Arab governor of Sindh destroyed the second temple as part of his invasions of Gujarat and Rajasthan. In 815 CE, the Gurjara-Pratihara king Nagabhata II constructed the third temple, a huge structure of red sandstone.

Also Read: Top 10 Famous Hindu Temples of Tamil Nadu

The Chaulukya (Solanki) king Mularaja possibly built the first temple at the site sometime before 997 CE, even though some historians believe that he may have renovated a smaller earlier temple.

Somnath Temple Attacks

Gujarat was raided by Mahmud of Ghazni in 1024, plundering the Somnath temple and breaking its sacred jyotirlinga. Ghazni took away the wealth of almost 20 million dinars. As per historical records, the damage to the temple by was quite negligible because there are records of pilgrimages to the temple in 1038, which has no much mention of any damage to the temple.

In14th century, Gujarati Muslim pilgrims were noted by Amir Khusrow to stop at that temple to pay their respects before departing for the Hajj pilgrimage. Wikimedia Commons
In14th century, Gujarati Muslim pilgrims were noted by Amir Khusrow to stop at that temple to pay their respects before departing for the Hajj pilgrimage. Wikimedia Commons

But claims are there that Mahmud had killed 50,000 devotees who tried to defend the temple. The temple at the time of Ghazni’s attack appears to have been a wooden structure, which is said to have decayed in time.

According to an inscription of 1169, Kumarapala rebuilt it in “excellent stone and studded it with jewels,”

Also Read: Angkor Wat: History behind Cambodian Hindu temple

Then in 1299, the Somnath Temple was invaded by Alauddin Khalji’s army, led by Ulugh Khan. They defeated the Vaghela king Karna and sacked the Somnath temple. Legends state that the Jalore ruler Kanhadadeva later recovered the Somnath idol and freed the Hindu prisoners, after an attack on the Delhi army near Jalore. However, some other sources state that the idol was taken to Delhi, where it was thrown to be trampled under the feet of Muslims.

The Somnath Temple was rebuilt by Mahipala I, the Chudasama king of Saurashtra in 1308 and the lingam was installed by his son Khengara sometime between 1331 and 1351.

In14th century, Gujarati Muslim pilgrims were noted by Amir Khusrow to stop at that temple to pay their respects before departing for the Hajj pilgrimage.

In 1395, the temple was again destroyed for the third time by Zafar Khan, the last governor of Gujarat under the Delhi Sultanate and later founder of Gujarat Sultanate.

In 1546, the Portuguese who were based in Goa attacked ports and towns in Gujarat including Somnath Temple and destroyed several of its structures.

Somnath temple to Dwarka

Dwarka is an ancient city in the Indian state of Gujarat. It is very near to Somnath temple and due to its relevance to Hindu pilgrimage; people do tend to visit this place also.

Also Read: The Temple of Death: The Abode of Yamraj

The magnificent Temple of Dwarka has an elaborately tiered main shrine, a carved entrance and a black-marble idol of Lord Krishna.

Somnath Temple said to have been safely hiding the famous Syamantak Mani within the hollowness of Shivalinga. Wikimedia Commons
Somnath Temple said to have been safely hiding the famous Syamantak Mani within the hollowness of Shivalinga. Wikimedia Commons

The road distance between Dwarka and Somnath is 231 km and the aerial distance from Dwarka to Somnath is 210 km. One can also cover the distance through train which is almost 398km distant.

Here are some facts that are attached to this sacred and architecturally marvellous temple.

  1. The present-day Somnath Temple was built in five years, from 1947 to 1951 and was inaugurated by then President of India Dr Rajendra Prasad.
  2. Somnath Temple said to have been safely hiding the famous Syamantak Mani within the hollowness of Shivalinga, the Philosopher’s stone, which is associated with Lord Krishna. The stone is said to be magical, which was capable of producing gold. It is also believed that stone had alchemic and radioactive properties and thus it remains floating above the ground.
  3. The temple finds its reference in the sacred texts of Hindus like Shreemad Bhagavat, Skandpuran, Shivpuran and Rig-Veda. This signifies the importance of this temple as one of the most popular pilgrimage sites in India.
  4. According to records, the site of Somnath has been a pilgrimage site from ancient times as it was said to be the junction of three rivers, Kapila, Hiran and the mythical Saraswati. The meeting point was called as Triveni Sangam and is believed to be the place where Soma, the Moon-god bathed and regained his lustre.
  5. According to Swami Gajanand Saraswati (a Hindu scholar), the first temple was built 7, 99, 25,105 years ago as derived from the traditions of Prabhas Khand of Skanda Puran.
  6. The temple is said to be located at such a place that there is no straight-line land between Somnath seashore till Antarctica continent. In a Sanskrit inscription, found on the Arrow-Pillar called Baan-Stambh is stated that the temple stands at a point on the Indian piece of land, which happens to be the first point on land in the north to the south-pole on that particular longitude.

    The saga of Somnath temple is related to moon god and curse of his father in law Daksha Prajapati. Wikimedia Commons
    The saga of Somnath temple is related to moon god and curse of his father in law Daksha Prajapati. Wikimedia Commons
  7. According to the text of Skanda Purana, the name of Somnath Temple will change every time the world is reconstructed. It is believed when Lord Brahma will create a new world after ending the one we are living, Somnath will acquire a new name of Pran Nath Temple.
  8. On the walls of Somnath Temple, the sculptures of Lord Brahma, Shiva and Vishnu can be seen.
  9. According to another reference in the Skanda Purana, there are about 6 Brahmas. This is the era of 7thBrahma who is called Shatanand.
  10. The flag mast on the peak of Somnath Temple is 37 feet long and it changes 3 times a day.
  11. The saga of Somnath temple is related to moon god and curse of his father in law Daksha Prajapati.
  12. Non-Hindus doesn’t require any special permission to visit Somnath Temple. The decision was taken in view of security issues.Now, pack your bags and begin your journey to one of the most the sacred places of India.