Wednesday December 12, 2018

How to Manage Your Cholesterol

Nutritionist Lovisa Nilsson has shared her top tips on how to keep your cholesterol levels in control, reports femalefirst.co.uk

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How to Manage Your Cholesterol
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Excess bad cholesterol can lead to heart disease or stroke, so take into account a few steps to manage your cholesterol levels.

Nutritionist Lovisa Nilsson has shared her top tips on how to keep your cholesterol levels in control, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

* Superfruits: Following recent nutritional studies, several fruits have been labelled ‘superfoods’ due to their ability to combat harmful fats and reduce bad cholesterol. For instance, it was recently revealed that strawberries have the ability to reduce LDL, the harmful form of cholesterol, by nearly 14 percent, according to research carried out by Università Politecnica Delle Marche in Italy.

red-wine
Red wine contains a plant compound called saponin which blocks the body’s absorption of bad cholesterol, LDL. Pixabay

* Unsaturated fats: Consuming omega-3 essential fatty acids, found in unsaturated fats, will help to lower the levels of bad cholesterol in the blood. Unsaturated fats include oily fish, nuts and seeds, ground flax seeds, olive oil and certain vegetables and fruits such as avocado.

Also Read: Low Fat Diets do not Curb Heart Disease

* Fibre: Beans, pulses, vegetables, cereal and whole grain breads all have a high fermentable fibre content and are therefore difficult for the gut to digest so they attach to bad cholesterol and then remove it from the body via waste.

* Red wine: Red wine contains a plant compound called saponin which blocks the body’s absorption of bad cholesterol, LDL. This news is not an excuse to drink large quantities of red wine and I do not recommend adding red wine to your diet purely for health reasons since alcohol consumption can lead to further health complications such as high blood pressure and liver disease. (IANS)

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Exposure to Lead, Mercury Increases Cholesterol Levels

For the study, the team reviewed information from a national representative database which includes cholesterol levels and blood levels of heavy metals among US adults

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Cholesterol
Lead, mercury exposure raises cholesterol levels: Study. Pixabay

Increased levels of lead and mercury in the blood could raise bad cholesterol levels, known to damage arteries, and increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, according to a preliminary research.

The findings by researchers from the Jacobi Medical Center in New York City showed that people with a high level of lead had 56 per cent greater odds of having higher total cholesterol and 22 per cent more likely to have higher bad cholesterol or lower density lipoprotein (LDL).

Those with the highest levels of mercury in their blood were 73 per cent more likely to have higher total cholesterol, while those with increased cadmium levels in the blood had a 41 per cent higher risk of cholesterol.

In addition, mercury levels increased the odds for higher LDL by 23 per cent among those who fell in the middle for their heavy metal levels, compared to those with the lowest level.

The rise in cholesterol seen with increasing heavy metal levels in the blood might have cardiovascular consequences in people exposed to heavy metals, such as in areas with disaster water crises, the researchers said.

Representational image.
Representational image. (IANS)

This suggests the need for screening for heavy metals as a risk for high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease, they said.

The results will be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2018 in Chicago.

Also Read- NASA Grants $7 mn For New Life Detection

For the study, the team reviewed information from a national representative database which includes cholesterol levels and blood levels of heavy metals among US adults.

They found a notable difference between those with the least blood levels of heavy metal and those with the most, with LDL becoming progressively higher as lead levels increased. (IANS)