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How scientists like Niels Bohr, Schrodinger, Nikola Tesla and Albert Einstein found the true meaning of Physics in Vedas

The article explores relationship between Physics and Vedas

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The founding fathers of Quantum Physics derived inspiration from Vedas
The founding fathers of Quantum Physics derived inspiration from Vedas

By Gaurav Sharma

At first glance, the subjects of science and metaphysics seem to be polar opposites of each other. The pioneers of Quantum Mechanics, however, believed it to be otherwise.

In fact, the founding fathers of Quantum Physics, while formulating their groundbreaking theories, sumptuously dug into annals of Vedic philosophy and found their experiments to be consistent with the knowledge expounded in Vedas.

Danish physicist and Nobel laureate Niels Bohr was fascinated with Vedas. His remark, “I go to the Upanishad to ask questions,” reveals a lot about his respect for the ancient wisdom of India.

Erwin Schrodinger, an Austrian-Irish physicist who also won the Nobel Prize for his famous wave equation, was also a keen proponent of the Vedic thought.

In his book Meine Weltansicht, Schrodinger says, “This life of yours which you are living is not merely a piece of this entire existence, but in a certain sense the whole; only this whole is not so constituted that it can be surveyed in one single glance. This, as we know, is that sacred, mystic formula which is yet really so simple and so clear; tat tvam asi, this is you. Or, again, in such words as “I am in the east and the west, I am above and below, I am this entire world.”

This is nothing but a Mundaka Upanishad mantra which proposes the connectivity of all living beings.

“The unity and continuity of Vedanta are reflected in the unity and continuity of wave mechanics.  This is entirely consistent with the Vedanta concept of All in One”, Schrodinger said while referring to each particle in the universe as a wave function.

Werner Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle, which states that we cannot measure both the position and momentum of a particle at the same time, is also a reflection of the Advaitic aphorism of rope and snake;“ When a snake is seen in the place of a rope, only the snake is seen as real. But is it independently real?”

But perhaps the greatest example of how modern-science viz quantum physics is inextricably intertwined with the spiritual concepts of the ancient world, comes through the works and words of Nikola Tesla.

The mastermind scientist and inventor, apart from knowing complex mathematical formulas possessed the subtle knowledge of the working of the universe.

In his seminal book Man’s Greatest Achievement, Tesla says, “All perceptible matter comes from a primary substance, or tenuity beyond conception, filling all space, the akasha or luminiferous ether, which is acted upon by the life giving Prana or creative force, calling into existence, in never-ending cycles all things and phenomena.”

The usage of words such as Prana and Akasha clearly show that the father of electricity was well-versed in the teachings of the Vedic worldview.

The relationship Tesla shared with Swami Vivekananda, a great Hindu reformist is also quite well-known.

Vivekananda in one of his works states: “Mr Tesla was charmed to hear about the Vedantic Prana and Akasha and Kalpas, which according to him are the only theories modern science can entertain. Now both Akasha and Prana are produced from the Mahat or the Universal Mind. Mr. Tesla thinks he can demonstrate mathematically that force and matter are reducible to potential energy. In that case the Vedantic cosmology will be placed on the surest of foundations. I am working a good deal now upon the cosmology and eschatology of the Vedanta. I clearly see their perfect union with modern science, and the elucidation of the one will be followed by that of the other.”

Tesla revolutionized science with the concepts of “Free energy”, also known as “Zero-point energy”. Unfortunately, the theories could never actualized, as his funding and grants were constantly revoked by those running the economy, such as JP Morgan, Westinghouse etc.

Albert Einstein, the father of the Theory of Relativity and developer of Quantum Mechanics also believed in the unity of the universe.“There is no spooky action at a distance”, he is known to have said. In his book, The World as I See It, Einstein says “I maintain that the cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest motive for scientific research”.

This clearly elucidates the fact that science cannot function in isolation with nature. And therefore, the current scientific view of extracting energy for the sole purpose of economic development is farcical.

Modern science can and should build on the work of previous western scientists, many of whom drew significant inspiration from the Vedas and Upanishad.

 

  • Brave Indian

    What do you say to brainwashed self-loathing Commies like these ? http://www.frontline.in/science-and-technology/hindutvas-science-envy/article9049883.ece#test

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  • Norma Alvarez

    Thank you Gary for the citations as proofs for your article. This is an important contribution to universal clarity on the importance of collaboration for and between science and spirit. I use many scientific proof sources in my book “And Then There Was You,” as the self-management tool used within its pages is from metaphysical teachings, Numerology, and many are still unschooled in vibrational energies that are available to improve our lives. N.J. Alvarez

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  • Chitranjan Kumar

    अहम् अति परास्नाचित्यामी. मुझे यह पढ़कर बहुत अच्छा लगा का की हमारे ऋषि मुनि ने सत्य की खोज हजारो साल पहेली कर दी थी और उसको पश्चिम के वज्ञानिक अभी समझ रहे हैं.

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  • Brave Indian

    What do you say to brainwashed self-loathing Commies like these ? http://www.frontline.in/science-and-technology/hindutvas-science-envy/article9049883.ece#test

  • Pingback: Homepage()

  • Norma Alvarez

    Thank you Gary for the citations as proofs for your article. This is an important contribution to universal clarity on the importance of collaboration for and between science and spirit. I use many scientific proof sources in my book “And Then There Was You,” as the self-management tool used within its pages is from metaphysical teachings, Numerology, and many are still unschooled in vibrational energies that are available to improve our lives. N.J. Alvarez

  • Pingback: My Homepage()

  • Pingback: cpns kemenkumham()

  • Chitranjan Kumar

    अहम् अति परास्नाचित्यामी. मुझे यह पढ़कर बहुत अच्छा लगा का की हमारे ऋषि मुनि ने सत्य की खोज हजारो साल पहेली कर दी थी और उसको पश्चिम के वज्ञानिक अभी समझ रहे हैं.

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The White House Echoes With Recitation of Hindu Vedic “Shanti Paath”

Religion also plays an open role in election campaigns

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White House
Introducing the peace prayer at the multi-religious service on Thursday, Pujari Harish Brahmbhatt said, "In these troubled times of COVID-19, social distancing, and the lockdown, it's not unusual for people to feel anxious or not at peace". IANS

The Vedic Shanti Paath derived from the Yajurveda has been recited at the White House during the National Day of Prayer by a pujari from a Swaminarayan temple.

Introducing the peace prayer at the multi-religious service on Thursday, Pujari Harish Brahmbhatt said, “In these troubled times of COVID-19, social distancing, and the lockdown, it’s not unusual for people to feel anxious or not at peace.”

Making a spiritual prescription for these troubled times, he said, “The Shanti Paath, or the peace prayer, is a prayer that does not seek worldly riches, success, fame, nor is it a prayer for any desire for heaven. It is a beautiful Hindu prayer for peace a” Shanti.

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Brahmbatt is from the Bochasanwasi Akshar Purushottam Sanstha Shri Swaminarayan Mandir in Robbinsville, New Jersey.

Background, Black, Yellow, Om, India, Symbol
The Vedic Shanti Paath derived from the Yajurveda has been recited at the White House during the National Day of Prayer by a pujari from a Swaminarayan temple. Pixabay

Representatives of various Christian sects, Judaism and Islam participate in the service with US President Donald Trump.

Religion plays a central role in public affairs in the US and has evolved from dominance by protestant denominations to being more inclusive with the participation of other Christian sects and other religions.

ALSO READ: This Hacker Group is Selling User Data From 10 Firms For INR 13.6 Lakh Approx

Both chambers of Congress and several state legislatures start their sessions with a prayer. Religion also plays an open role in election campaigns. (IANS)

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Einstein Letters of Admiration and Advice Auctioned in Jerusalem

Last October, Winner's sold another Einstein letter, a 1922 meditation on happiness that he wrote upon learning he had won the Nobel, for $1.3 million

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Einstein
A note written by Albert Einstein to Italian chemistry student Elisabetta Piccini in Florence, Italy, in 1921 is seen before it is sold at an auction in Jerusalem, March 6, 2018. VOA

A note written by Albert Einstein to an Italian woman scientist who had declined to meet him sold at auction Tuesday along with a batch of other letters left by the renowned physicist.

“To the scientific researcher, at whose feet I slept and sat for two full days, as a friendly souvenir,” reads the note in his native German, signed and dated October 1921, which fetched $6,100 at Winner’s Auctions & Exhibitions in Jerusalem.

The auction house said Einstein, then 42 and soon to win the Nobel Prize, wrote the letter to Elisabetta Piccini, a chemistry student half his age who lived one floor above his sister, Maja, in Florence.

einstein
During a visit to the city, “Einstein was very interested in meeting her. However, Elisabetta was introverted and too shy to meet with such a famous person,” Winner’s said on its website. VOA

ALSO READ: Albert Einstein’s Century-old Prediction comes True: Third Gravitational Waves detected by Scientists

Also sold Tuesday for $103,000 was a 1928 note in which the auction house said Einstein outlined ideas for his “Third Stage of the Theory of Relativity.” A 1946 English-language letter of encouragement that he penned to an American World War II veteran who aspired to be a scientist also fetched $6,100.

Last October, Winner’s sold another Einstein letter, a 1922 meditation on happiness that he wrote upon learning he had won the Nobel, for $1.3 million. (VOA)

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Know Your India: How Well Do You Know Hindu Wisdom?

Our rich past must remain our greatest inspiration and inform our engagement with the world

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Hindu wisdom and the broader framework of Eastern philosophy talked in the same language as modern physics was beginning to do. Wikimedia Commons
Hindu wisdom and the broader framework of Eastern philosophy talked in the same language as modern physics was beginning to do. Wikimedia Commons

By Bikash Sarmah

No matter how our self-styled secularists vilify ancient Indian or Hindu wisdom, there is an element of eternity and universality about that treasure trove. It is a great work of reason and analysis. And there is no confusion in the discourse. Such is its universality that the intelligent Westerner woke up to it long ago and discovered the wealth therein. Such is its practicality that when Albert Einstein deconstructed the long-held Newtonian worldview in the early part of the 20th century, and when quantum mechanics from the other side revolutionized the whole course of physics and brought about a paradigm shift in our perception of matter and energy, the founding fathers of the evolving field had already taken resort in Hindu wisdom, and to their utter surprise found that Hindu wisdom and the broader framework of Eastern philosophy talked in the same language as modern physics was beginning to do. And it was not restricted to physics or mathematics alone. Even Western writers and philosophers began to appreciate Hindu wisdom, but not without struggling to comprehend the non-Newtonian Hindu worldview — used as they were to a discrete, Newtonian notion of fundamentalism, both in the material and non-material world.

As an acclaimed physicist and thinker Fritjof Capra says in his classic The Tao of Physics, ‘‘The picture of an interconnected cosmic web which emerges from modern atomic physics has been used extensively in the East to convey the mystical experience of nature. For the Hindus, Brahman is the unifying thread in the cosmic web, the ultimate ground of all being… In Buddhism, the image of the cosmic web plays an even greater role. The core of the Avatamsaka Sutra, one of the main scriptures of Mahayana Buddhism, is the description of the world as a perfect network of mutual relations where all things and events interact with each other in an infinitely complicated way.’’

In Buddhism, the image of the cosmic web plays an even greater role. The core of the Avatamsaka Sutra, one of the main scriptures of Mahayana Buddhism, is the description of the world as a perfect network of mutual relations where all things and events interact with each other in an infinitely complicated way.’’ Says Fritjof Capra. Wikimedia Commons
In Buddhism, the image of the cosmic web plays an even greater role. The core of the Avatamsaka Sutra, one of the main scriptures of Mahayana Buddhism, is the description of the world as a perfect network of mutual relations where all things and events interact with each other in an infinitely complicated way.’’ Says Fritjof Capra. Wikimedia Commons

ALSO READ: Future of Hinduism in US: An Analysis

Such worldview brings a lot of discomfort to the typical Western mind brought up in a culture that emphasizes only rigid fundamentals and overlooks the varied possibilities beyond the confinement of fundamentals, unlike in the Hindu system that rejects such fundamentalism and espouses a notion of the world, both material and spiritual, that jells wonderfully with the implications of the theories of modern physics. But how well is this known? It is in this context that a compilation of Western thoughts on India and its ancient wisdom, titled ‘Great minds on India’ compiled by Salil Gewali and published by Academic Publications, Shillong, is pertinent. It captures the best of comments by Western intellectual giants on Hindu wisdom and its timelessness, reflecting also on the parallels between modern physics and Hindu wisdom. Let us hear some of them. Werner Heisenberg, one of the founders of quantum mechanics and celebrated for his epoch-making Uncertainty Principle in quantum mechanics that rejects the Newtonian assertion of predicting the position and momentum of matter simultaneously, glorifies Hindu wisdom thus:

‘‘After the conversations about Indian philosophy, some of the ideas of quantum physics that had seemed so crazy suddenly made much more sense.’’ If Einstein says that ‘‘we owe a lot to Indians who taught us how to count, without which no worthwhile scientific discovery could be made’’, Julius R Oppenheimer, the father of nuclear bomb, goes further: ‘‘What we shall find in modern physics is an exemplification, an encouragement and a refinement of old Hindu wisdom.’’

‘‘Indian philosophers’ subtleties make most of the great European philosophers look like schoolboys.’’ Says TS Eliot. Wikimedia Commons
‘‘Indian philosophers’ subtleties make most of the great European philosophers look like schoolboys.’’ Says TS Eliot. Wikimedia Commons

Coming to TS Eliot, who needs no introduction. He says: ‘‘Indian philosophers’ subtleties make most of the great European philosophers look like schoolboys.’’ What Eliot means, in other words, is that when it comes to subtlety — that is, to the delicate refinement of ideas — most of the great European philosophers should rather be huddled in a classroom with an Indian philosopher teaching and guiding them. That is why Francois M Voltaire, one of the greatest French writers and philosophers, admits thus: ‘‘I am convinced that everything has come down to us from the banks of the Ganga — astronomy, astrology, spiritualism etc. It is very important to note that some 2,500 years ago at the least Pythagoras went from Samos to the Ganga to learn geometry… But he would certainly not have undertaken such a strange journey had the reputation of the Brahmins’ science not been long established in Europe.’’ And that is why Ralph Waldo Emerson, great American author, and essayist, confesses to having been ‘‘haunted’’ by the Vedas. ‘‘In them (the Vedas),’’ Emerson says, ‘‘I have found eternal compensation, unfathomable power, unbroken peace.’’ And hence the candor, again, of Arthur Schopenhauer, one of the greatest German philosophers and writers: ‘‘In the whole world there is no study so beneficial and so elevating as that of the Upanishads. It has been the solace of my life, and it will be the solace of my death. They are the product of the highest wisdom.’’

ALSO READ: Hindu Americans are role models for Hindus in India: Dr. David Frawley

Perhaps the best eulogy for India, as it truly deserves, has come from Frederich von Schlegel, acclaimed German writer, critic, philosopher, and one of the founders of German Romanticism: ‘‘There is no language in the world, even Greek, which has the clarity and the philosophical precision of Sanskrit, and this great India is not only at the origin of everything, she is (also) superior in everything, intellectually, religiously or politically, and even the Greek heritage seems pale in comparison.’’

The booklet, ‘Eat minds on India’, is doubtless a unique venture, and the publishers deserve kudos for having accomplished such an onerous task as to compile comments on India and Hindu wisdom by a galaxy of Western intellectual giants and then to choose the best and the most relevant ones. The tragedy, however, remains: a pseudo-secular dispensation as we are blessed with at the Centre would hardly initiate any move to popularize ancient Indian wisdom, which is essentially Hindu, and call upon the youth of the country to rediscover their past and marvel at the sheer effulgence of Hindu wisdom — stemming not from any dogmatic, fundamentalist and conditioned worldview, but from a holistic way of life and its liberating experience. This is so because the word ‘‘Hindu’’ will invariably echo in any discourse on ancient Indian wisdom and the country’s perverse, self-styled secularists will discover a ‘communal’ agenda there — ‘against our pluralist ethos’. These poor souls do not realize — nor do they want to — that whatever pluralist ethos the country today takes pride in and will sustain for all times is due solely to the Hindu way of life, a preponderant way of life in India. Why, look at how the other by-product of Partition, including Bangladesh, has evolved.

Our rich past must remain our greatest inspiration and inform our engagement with the world. Even quantum mechanics and all of its later avatars recognize that fact of life. Let us all be proud of it all.

(The writer is the former consultant Editor of ‘The Sentinel’, a Guwahati-based
daily. He currently resides in Guwahati)