Monday March 25, 2019
Home Opinion How small act...

How small acts of transparency by AAP are taking Delhi towards good governance

1
//
Delhi Elections 2015 and AAP

AAP rejoices over leads in counting trends in delhi elections

By Devika Sharma

The “Common Man” party’s fledgling performance has galvanized political participation in a huge way as hoards of people across India are rushing to join a force that they hope will bring about good governance.

Aam Aadmi Party after coming to power has succeeded in exhibiting a break from traditional politics. AAP signifies a paradigm shift in 2 ways. First, the AAP has been formed, not by the big shots in politics but by the common people. Its entire leadership comprises of activists barely known till India Against Corruption started three years ago in 2010. And second, that AAP transcends, what they call, politics of citizenship. AAP’s primary pitch is for good governance has been its promise to fight corruption and bring transparency to governance

The emergence of AAP has also highlighted the limitations that transparency faces. Transparency is subjective. The anti-corruption movement from which AAP emerged was formed by people who had been using RTI as a tool to delve deep for information and unmask corruption. But they gradually realized that successive exposes of corruption had little significance without independent investigative and prosecuting agencies.

In 2005 when the RTI  Act was passed by the UPA government, it was deemed to be revolutionary, a law with the potential of bringing back power balance. Now the rise of AAP, is suggesting a rebalancing of power. AAP’s initiatives such as “I paid a bribe” precipitated popular mobilization against corruption.

A press release by AAP stated that “All government services and forms will be made available online and through mobile phones. Data on the government projects, performance, accounts and personnel will be made transparent and online. This will bring transparency and accountability in governance. AAP will scout for and implement projects based on the motto: “Big Change without Big Spending”

AAP, for the first time in India’s history of political parties, is transparent about its income and expenditure. Every rupee it receives is updated on its web site. AAP has pioneered one way of eliminating the source of graft by transparent sourcing and reporting contributions.

After coming to power AAP has been regularly updating its website and informing people about its meetings, policy decisions, funding, and other whereabouts. They have taken e-governance to a whole new level. They have also taken up interesting campaigns wherein they are installing bill boards on flyovers stating the expenditure that went into making of those flyovers.

An Anti corruption helpline was launched, encouraging citizens to report cases of corruption. This has resulted in several officials being caught. Importantly, there is increased deterrence amongst officials, which has brought about a decrease in the acts of corruption in the city.

The “VIP” culture, which is a legacy left to us by our colonial rulers, has been abolished. ‘lal batti’ cars and other privileges have been brought to a halt by the AAP govt.

20 liters of water has been made free for all homes in Delhi. Also, the schedule of water tanker operations is now publicly available for citizens to assess. The AAP also launched a helpline number for parents to report cases of bribery and harassment by schools regarding nursery admissions of children.

AAP has demonstrated that information can become a weapon for popular mobilization and create endless possibilities for deeper governance reform.

  • Don’t know what steps u r talking abt but one very visible AAP effect is that now only 1 out of 10 autowaala are using meters.
    AAM ADMI ki toh pata nahi bt autowaalo ki sarkar toh bann gayi hai. :-@

Next Story

Now The Delhi Government Comes Up With The Food Wastage Check Policy At Social Gatherings

"If the food is surplus due to lower turnout of the guest and resultant less consumption, then it shall be the responsibility of organiser of the social function to remove that food from the social function site, immediately after the completion of the duration of that social function," it says.

0
food wastage
"Further, officers of respective ULB will conduct random or complaint-based inspection. The violations would be noted with proofs by the inspecting officers without the disrupting the function. In the event of violation of any of the conditions, the penalty would be imposed against violators under specific act/rules/orders." Pixabay

The Delhi government has drafted a policy to keep a check on the wastage of food at social functions in the national capital.

All organisers and caterers will have to register themselves with NGOs to manage the surplus and leftover food for distribution among the underprivileged, says the draft policy.

“The caterer should make proper arrangements to handover fresh surplus and leftover food to these NGOs,” reads the Draft ‘Policy for Holding Social Functions in Hotels, Motels and Low-Density Residential Area (LDRA) in National Capital Territory of Delhi’.

According to the draft policy, the owner, organiser, and the caterer must have the necessary permissions including FSSAI license from Delhi’s Department of Food Safety, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to run their kitchens or to sell or serve prepared food for the guest and the consumer.

“They should be registered with some NGO to manage surplus/leftover food by distributing the same among underprivileged. The caterer should make proper arrangements to handover fresh surplus and leftover food to these NGOs.

The food preparation should be according to the ceiling of the number of guests as per prescribed capacity of the motel and LDRA. The number of guests cannot exceed the guest limit approved by the Urban Local Body (ULB) for that function site, it says.

“If the food is surplus due to lower turnout of the guest and resultant less consumption, then it shall be the responsibility of organiser of the social function to remove that food from the social function site, immediately after the completion of the duration of that social function,” it says.

food
According to the draft policy, the owner, organiser, and the caterer must have the necessary permissions including FSSAI license from Delhi’s Department of Food Safety, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to run their kitchens or to sell or serve prepared food for the guest and the consumer. Pixabay

The Commissioner Food Safety shall ensure that the above conditions are strictly followed; any violation thereof would invite action from the deployed officers by the Commissioner Food Safety, the draft policy reads.

The rules will be enforced by periodical inspections, which shall be conducted by officers of various state stakeholder agencies.

“Further, officers of respective ULB will conduct random or complaint-based inspection. The violations would be noted with proofs by the inspecting officers without the disrupting the function. In the event of violation of any of the conditions, the penalty would be imposed against violators under specific act/rules/orders.”

“The capacity of the space should be determined by multiplying the total number of car parking available by four or by means the number of persons obtained by dividing the gross floor area of the premises by occupant load factor at 1.5 sqm, whichever is less,” says the document.

It said adding that the total number of days on which a social function can be organised are restricted to 120 days in authorized/approved spaces.

food wastage
The food preparation should be according to the ceiling of the number of guests as per prescribed capacity of the motel and LDRA. The number of guests cannot exceed the guest limit approved by the Urban Local Body (ULB) for that function site, it says.
Pixabay

The draft also said that motels and LDRA should be constructed as per sanctioned building plan.
“Minimum area of LDRA must be equals or more than 2.5 acres. Only such Motel and LDRA houses should be permitted to hold social functions which have proper access to the road from a main road (60 ft wide or more) and the LDRA should not be located at a road which ends in a dead end,” it said.

According to an official from the government, the decision to formulate a comprehensive policy regulating social functions was taken after the direction of the Supreme Court.

“Further, in view of Motel Policy of Ministry of Tourism 1995, policy for holding social functions in Farmhouses of Government of NCT of Delhi, Master Plan 2021(MPD 2021), amendments in MPD-2021 notified in 2013, a comprehensive policy was required to be drafted,” the official told IANS on the condition of anonymity.

Also Read: Build a Better Mobile App Using These 3 Key Steps

The Chief Secretary has constituted a committee of four officers, including Principal Secretaries of Urban Development and Health, Chief Executive Officer, Delhi Jal Board and Member Secretary, Delhi Pollution Control Committee, to draft the policy.

“Accordingly, the committee after consultation with all stakeholders drafted the policy keeping in mind concerns of Environment Pollution (Prevention and Control) Authority (EPCA) and Supreme Court such as stop the use of perennially installed semi-permanent pandals, nuisance of parking on outside road of the venue, safety of guests and general public, stop the misuse of scarce resources like water and stop any kind of pollution or degradation of Environment,” the official said. (IANS)