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Chinese Tech Giant Huawei Denies Cutting Back Production Amid US Crackdown

Huawei last week filed a motion in a US court challenging the constitutionality of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (2019 NDAA)

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Huawei, information
Logo of Huawei is seen on the advert in front of the local offices of Huawei in Warsaw, Poland, Jan. 11, 2019. VOA

Chinese tech giant Huawei has denied reports that it has cut down smartphone manufacture, thus suspending a number of production lines at its major supplier Foxconn.

“Foxconn, the Taiwanese electronics manufacturer that assembles handsets products for many phone brands including Apple and Xiaomi, has stopped several production lines for Huawei phones in recent days as the Shenzhen company reduced orders for new phones, according to people familiar with the matter, who asked not to be named as the information is private,” the South China Morning Post had reported.

The tech titan is also reassessing its target to become the world’s top-selling smartphone vendor by 2020, after the US trade ban has been put in place.

“As the new situation has emerged, it is too early to say whether we are able to achieve the goal,” Zhao Ming, President of Honor, one of Huawei’s smartphone brands, was quoted assaying by the SCMP.

Taiwanese company Foxconn which manufacturers electronics from Apple, Huawei, Sony, Nokia, Xiaomi among others, has cut down several Huawei production lines after the smartphone maker reportedly cut back orders, reports said.

Huawei, Trump, information
People walk past an advertisement for Huawei at a subway station in Hong Kong. VOA

On May 15, US President Donald Trump effectively banned Huawei with a national security order.

The US publicly asked its allies to steer clear of using Huawei products over concerns that the equipment could be used by the Chinese government to obtain private information.

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Huawei last week filed a motion in a US court challenging the constitutionality of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (2019 NDAA).

The Chinese tech giant also asked for an end to US’ state-sanctioned campaign against it arguing that it would “not deliver cybersecurity”. A hearing on the motion is scheduled for September 19. (IANS)

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Small Shops in US Often Sell Tobacco Without Checking Age

More than 64 per cent of grocery stores checked IDs, compared with about 34 per cent of convenience stores and tobacco shops, and 29 per cent bars, restaurants and alcohol stores

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FILE - An anti-tobacco warning is seen on a road divider on the outskirts of New Delhi, India, Nov. 4, 2016. VOA

Those buying tobacco from shops in the US, especially small stores, are usually not asked for identification hence it is easy for underage users to buy cigarettes there, says a study.

When researchers, aged 20 and 21, visited a variety of shops in the US, more than 60 per cent of cashiers did not ask them for identification.

In the study published in the American Journal of Health Promotion, it was found that these young adults slipped by without an age check most often when they visited small stores, tobacco shops and shops plastered with tobacco ads.

“Our findings suggest that certain types of stores – tobacco shops, convenience stores and those with a lot of tobacco advertising – are more likely to sell tobacco to a young person without checking his or her ID,” said Megan Roberts, Assistant Professor at Ohio State University in the US.

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FILE – Cigarette packs are seen on shelves in a tobacco shop in Cagnes-sur-Mer, France. VOA

“One implication of this finding is that enforcement may benefit from targeted outreach and monitoring at these locations,” she added.

The study included visits to a randomly sampled 103 tobacco retailers in 2017.

Also Read: Use of Oral Steroids Increases Risk of Infection in People with Inflammation

More than 64 per cent of grocery stores checked IDs, compared with about 34 per cent of convenience stores and tobacco shops, and 29 per cent bars, restaurants and alcohol stores.

“Having a minimum legal sales age for tobacco is important for reducing youth access to tobacco. Not only does it prevent young people from purchasing tobacco for themselves, but it prevents them from buying tobacco and distributing it to others, often younger peers,” Roberts said. (IANS)