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Huawei Builds Mini Europe in China to House R&D Arm

At the moment, Huawei devices are banned in the US, Australia and New Zealand. A possible ban in other countries would be a bad news for the company, for which Europe id the biggest market

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Logo of Huawei is seen on the advert in front of the local offices of Huawei in Warsaw, Poland, Jan. 11, 2019. VOA

Chinese technology giant Huawei, which is in the eye of a global security storm, has built a new campus in China that looks like a cluster of European cities.

The campus with an old European feel is connected through a futuristic tram service that takes thousands of Huawei employees to their destinations in the faux-Europe, dotted with 12 buildings, the Efe news reported.

The company has opted for the ostentatious campus in Dongguan (south) for research and development.

There are replicas of Italian towers, artificial lakes and palaces. The campus houses buildings and squares that look like the ones of the medieval Europe, reflecting Huawei’s infinite global ambitions despite a tough year marked by suspicions on security flaws in its devices and the arrest of its CFO Meng Wanzhou in Canada.

The company announced on Friday its net profit in 2018 increased by 25.1 per cent year on year to 9.3 billion yuan and invested 101.5 billion yuan for research and development.

The feel at the campus is surreal. Employees, visitors and clients riding the train get down at stops named like Paris, Verona, Freiburg and Granada.

The campus, spread over 1.4 million square meters, is situated on the banks of lake Songshan. It has been designed to create an idyllic work environment to motivate employees and where long-term plans of the company could be developed.

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A staff member stands in front of a Huawei shop in Beijing, China, March 7, 2019. VOA

According to sources, these places are undergoing heavy investment in innovation in areas of virtual reality, in smart cities, with hyper-vigilance and facial recognition,- and the Internet of Things (IoT).

Joe Kelly, head of international communication, told a group of international journalists that all these new strategies and values of the company inspire self-criticism and cooperation among employees.

However, the journalists raised the issues the company is facing, including the security conditions of 5G mobile connectivity.

Guo Ping, Rotating Chairman of the company, said none of its products have technological back doors or nor does it have the capability to access a device without the knowledge of the user.

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The clarification comes in the middle of allegations that Huawei was part of Beijing’s intelligence system that led the European Commission to urge countries to analyse and be alert of threats that the tech giant poses to the development of 5G data connectivity.

At the moment, Huawei devices are banned in the US, Australia and New Zealand. A possible ban in other countries would be a bad news for the company, for which Europe id the biggest market. (IANS)

Next Story

Snake is the Most Probable Wildlife Animal Reservoir of Novel Coronavirus: Study

Snake was one of the animals being sold in Wuhan's Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market before its closure.

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Snake is the most probable wildlife animal reservoir for the novel coronavirus that had caused 17 deaths in central China's Hubei Province. (Representational Image). Pixabay

A study published on Wednesday in the Journal of Medical Virology showed that snake is the most probable wildlife animal reservoir for the novel coronavirus that had caused 17 deaths in central China’s Hubei Province.

Scientists from Peking University Health Science Center School of Basic Medical Sciences, the First affiliated Hospital of Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Ruikang Hospital Affiliated to Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Ningbo University’s School of Medicine, and Wuhan University of Bioengineering carried out a comprehensive analysis on the existing sequences of the newly identified coronavirus, the Xinhua news agency reported.

They used a method called “relative synonymous codon usage” (RSCU) bias to compare RNA sequences of different animal species.

Snake was one of the animals being sold in Wuhan’s Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market before its closure. The market is believed to be related to most of the infected cases.

Snake
Snake was one of the animals being sold in Wuhan’s Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market before its closure. The market is believed to be related to most of the infected cases. Pixabay

Results obtained from the analyses suggested that the new virus 2019-nCoV appeared to be a recombinant virus between the bat coronavirus and an origin-unknown coronavirus.

The recombination occurred within the viral spike glycoprotein, which recognizes cell surface receptor. Additionally, their findings suggested that snake is the most probable wildlife animal reservoir for the 2019-nCoV based on its RSCU bias resembling snake compared to other animals.

Taken together, the research results suggested that homologous recombination within the spike glycoprotein may contribute to cross-species transmission from snake to humans.

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Glycoprotein is a group of conjugated proteins containing small amounts of carbohydrates.

Chinese health authorities have posted the full genome of 2019-nCoV in the genetic sequence database of U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Global Initiative on Sharing All Influenza Data, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (IANS)