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Attendees pass by a Huawei booth during the 2019 CES in Las Vegas, Nevada, Jan. 9, 2019. VOA

Giving fight to the likes of Apple Watch and Samsung Gear smartwatch, Chinese technology giant Huawei on Tuesday launched Watch GT with “ultra-high” battery life starting at Rs 15,990.

The Huawei Watch GT would be available on Amazon.in starting March 19 at Rs 16,990 for the classic edition and Rs 15,990 for the sports edition, said the company which is fighting legal battles in the US over the ban on its products.


“We have received an overwhelming response on our current lineup of products and are now looking at expanding our portfolio, and providing the complete Huawei ecosystem experience to our customers here,” said Tornado Pan, Country Manager (Huawei Brand), Consumer Business Group, Huawei India.

“The HUAWEI Watch GT addresses one of the most common pain points of wearables: battery life,” Pan added.

Huawei Watch GT integrates the functional specifications in a 10.6 mm thick compact body and features a 1.39-inch, 454×454 AMOLED display.


Logo of Huawei is seen on the advert in front of the local offices of Huawei in Warsaw, Poland, Jan. 11, 2019. VOA

The smart watch body incorporates a dual-crown design with stainless steel and ceramic bezels.

Huawei claimed that the Watch GT uses an innovative smart power-saving algorithm that enables the watch to enter normal mode if it identifies “dynamic scenario” or low-power consumption model if it identifies “static scenario”, allowing the smart watch to stay powered for up to two weeks on the frequent-use mode.

Also Read- Sri Lanka to Launch Light Rail Transit System To Ease Traffic Congestion

The Watch GT supports 24-hour continuous smart heart rate monitoring, and can detect the user’s exercise status before entering the exercise mode, Huawei said.

The company also launched Band 3 Pro, a new smart wristband supporting monitoring capabilities, including heart rate and sleep monitoring for Rs 4,699. (IANS)


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