Wednesday August 21, 2019

Human Stem Cells May Help Recover from Damage Caused by Heart Attack: Study

The study showed improvement in the heart muscle cell's ability to contract and relax

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heart attack
The study showed improvement in the heart muscle cell's ability to contract and relax. Pixabay

Researchers have found a combination of heart cells derived from human stem cells could help to recover from the damage caused by a heart attack. In a study, published in the Nature Biotechnology journal, a team led by an Indian-origin researcher noted that by transplanting an area of damaged tissue with a combination of both heart muscle cells and supportive cells taken from the outer layer of the heart wall, they may be able to repair the damaged hearts.

The researchers from the University of Cambridge in collaboration with researchers from the University of Washington used supportive epicardial cells developed from human stem cells to help transplanted heart cells live longer.

They used 3D human heart tissue grown in the lab from human stem cells to test the cell combination, finding that the supportive epicardial cells helped heart muscle cells to grow and mature. The study showed improvement in the heart muscle cell’s ability to contract and relax. In rats with damaged hearts, the combination restored lost heart muscle and blood vessel cells.

heart attack
Researchers hope that by harnessing the regenerative power of stem cells, they will be able to heal human hearts one day by using a patient’s cells. Pixabay

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“There are hundreds of thousands of people in the UK living with heart failure — many are in a race against time for a life-saving heart transplant. But with only around 200 heart transplants performed each year in the UK, it’s essential that we start finding alternative treatments,” said a leader of the study Sanjay Sinha, a British Heart Foundation (BHF)-funded researcher from the University of Cambridge.

Researchers hope that by harnessing the regenerative power of stem cells, they will be able to heal human hearts one day by using a patient’s cells. “When it comes to mending broken hearts, stem cells haven’t yet really lived up to their early promise. We hope that this latest research represents the turning of the tide in the use of these remarkable cells,” said Nilesh Samani, Medical Director at BHF. (IANS)

Next Story

People Suffering from Insomnia Might have Increased Risk of Coronary Artery Disease, Heart Failure and Stroke

These observational studies were unable to determine whether insomnia is a cause, or if it is just associated with them

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Insomnia, Heart Disease, Heart Failure
According to researchers, previous observational studies have found an association between insomnia, which affects up to 30 per cent of the general population and an increased risk of developing heart disease and stroke. Pixabay

People suffering from insomnia might have an increased risk of coronary artery disease, heart failure and stroke, says a study.

According to researchers, previous observational studies have found an association between insomnia, which affects up to 30 per cent of the general population and an increased risk of developing heart disease and stroke.

“These observational studies were unable to determine whether insomnia is a cause, or if it is just associated with them,” said the study’s lead author Susanna Larsson, Associate Professor at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

In the study, the researchers applied Mendelian randomisation, a technique that uses genetic variants known to be connected with a potential risk factor, such as insomnia, to reduce bias in the results.

Insomnia, Heart Disease, Heart Failure
People suffering from insomnia might have an increased risk of coronary artery disease, heart failure and stroke, says a study. Pixabay

The 1.3 million participants with or without heart disease and stroke were drawn from four major public studies and groups, said the research published in the journal Circulation.

Researchers found genetic variants for insomnia were associated with significantly higher odds of coronary artery disease, heart failure and ischemic stroke – particularly large artery stroke.

“It is important to identify the underlying reason for insomnia and treat it.

“Sleep is a behaviour that can be changed by new habits and stress management,” Larsson said.

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A limitation to the study is that the results represent a genetic variant link to insomnia rather than insomnia itself. (IANS)