Wednesday June 20, 2018

Human Touch Can Rehabilitate Patients

The researchers are particularly interested in how their findings could help people performing exercises for rehabilitation, for example when recovering from stroke

0
//
12
Human Touch Can Rehabilitate Patients
Human Touch Can Rehabilitate Patients. Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

It does take two to tango when it comes to performing a physical task better.

According to a new study, human touch is the key and people improve their performance more when they practise with a partner rather than on their own.

Scientists from Imperial College London and two Japanese institutions explored whether physical interaction improved the way people performed in a computer-based task where they were using a joystick-like device.

They were connected by a virtual elastic band to the same type of device operated by another person, who was hidden from view.

Most of the participants were unaware that they were working with a partner, but in spite of this they subconsciously used information transmitted through their partner’s touch to enhance their performance.

“Participants achieved noticeably better results in the task when working with a partner than they did working on their own,” said Etienne Burdet from the department of bioengineering at Imperial College London.

Improvements were most noticeable when the individual was practising with another human and not a robot.
Improvements were most noticeable when the individual was practising with another human and not a robot.

The researchers are particularly interested in how their findings could help people performing exercises for rehabilitation, for example when recovering from stroke.

“Our study says touch plays a vital and very subtle role in helping people to transmit information to one another,” added Burdet.

The researchers discovered that where one person was physically connected to a partner when learning a task, they consistently improved their performance regardless of how well their partner performed.

Improvements were most noticeable when the individual was practising with another human and not a robot.

Also Read: Googling About Symptoms Can Predict Disease

“It’s fascinating that this kind of communication can be so powerful even when people cannot see each other. Getting robotic devices to mimic this process could help people make bigger improvements when they are carrying out exercises in rehabilitation,” stressed Atsushi Takagi, co-author of the study from Imperial College London.

Robots are increasingly used for rehabilitation and physiotherapy and the researchers believe that these robots would be more effective if they could react to patients through touch in the same way that people do. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Finally The Cause Of Depression Among Diabetes Patients Discovered

The research showed that higher levels of galectin-3 -- an inflammatory protein -- is the culprit.

0
Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Increased levels of a protein inflammation in the body may be the reason behind depression — a mental health disorder characterised by persistently depressed mood or loss of interest in activities — among people with Type-1 diabetes, according to researchers.

It is well established that people with both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing depression, but the causes remain poorly understood.

The research showed that higher levels of galectin-3 — an inflammatory protein — is the culprit.

Galectin-3 is a key protein involved in promoting inflammatory immune system responses that are needed to repair tissue damage throughout the body, in response to injury or disease.

Depression
Depression, flickr

According to the researchers, galectin-3 — also linked with Alzheimer’s and cardiovascular diseases — may be useful for diagnosis of depression or maybe a new target for treating depression associated with Type-1 diabetes, which could lead to better patient care.

“We found that people with Type-1 diabetes and depression had higher galectin-3 levels, yet no other diabetes-related metabolic changes could account for these elevated levels,” said Eva Olga Melin from Lund University, Sweden.

The study, published in the journal Endocrine Connections, analysed data on measurements of galectin-3 levels in 283 people, aged between 18-59 years, with Type-1 diabetes for a year.

The results showed that both men and women with Type-1 diabetes and depression also had significantly higher galectin-3 levels.

Also read: Wife’s BMI Mens risk of developing diabetes

“…these findings suggest that further investigating the role of galectin-3 could lead to improved diagnosis and maybe better treatment outcomes for patients in the future,” Melin said.(IANS)