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Roti Bank ensures Right to Food for underprivileged people. Wikimedia
  • Mahoba is one of the most backward districts of Bundelkhand
  • But Right to Food is turning into a reality for the needy people of the district
  • India’s first “Roti Bank” has been set up to help hungry people have access to basic necessity of food

Bundelkhand, August 21, 2017: India’s first “Roti Bank” is now operating successfully in Bundelkhand’s one of the most backward districts called Mahoba.

This “Roti Bank” is ensuring the most basic human right, i.e. the Right to Food is met for hundreds of people in dire need.

Also Read: Sanjha Chulha: This Famous Eatery from Kolkata Feeds the Underprivileged with their Food ATM

A group of 5 elders and 40 youngsters manage and run the Roti Bank. The noble initiative provides vegetables and home-cooked rotis to the underprivileged. Knocking on the doors of residents, the 40 youngsters ask for a donation in the form of two rotis to their “bank” which will go into feeding the hungry.

The Roti Bank was started in April 2017 under Bundeli Samaj’s supervision and began by feeding the beggars at railway stations. Slowly, it gained the confidence of the local people. Four months later, the generous organization is feeding about 400 people every day.

Slum Dwellers, patients outside the hospitals and the poor are now served through Roti Bank. The people behind Roti Bank have one collection point where all the donations are put together. Volunteers take the food from here and distribute it. The collections are done from 8 different sectors into which the city is divided.

Although, many supporters of the initiative are offering help, Tara Patkar, the mind behind the Roti bank explains, “We are scared of wastage. We will not increase operations till we are sure of the beneficiaries.”

– Prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt.

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