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Hundreds of Needy People are Fed Everyday by India’s First “Roti Bank” in Mahoba District

A group of 5 elders and 40 youngsters manage and run the Roti Bank

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Roti Bank
Roti Bank ensures Right to Food for underprivileged people. Wikimedia
  • Mahoba is one of the most backward districts of Bundelkhand
  • But Right to Food is turning into a reality for the needy people of the district
  • India’s first “Roti Bank” has been set up to help hungry people have access to basic necessity of food

Bundelkhand, August 21, 2017: India’s first “Roti Bank” is now operating successfully in Bundelkhand’s one of the most backward districts called Mahoba.

This “Roti Bank” is ensuring the most basic human right, i.e. the Right to Food is met for hundreds of people in dire need.

Also Read: Sanjha Chulha: This Famous Eatery from Kolkata Feeds the Underprivileged with their Food ATM

A group of 5 elders and 40 youngsters manage and run the Roti Bank. The noble initiative provides vegetables and home-cooked rotis to the underprivileged. Knocking on the doors of residents, the 40 youngsters ask for a donation in the form of two rotis to their “bank” which will go into feeding the hungry.

The Roti Bank was started in April 2017 under Bundeli Samaj’s supervision and began by feeding the beggars at railway stations. Slowly, it gained the confidence of the local people. Four months later, the generous organization is feeding about 400 people every day.

Slum Dwellers, patients outside the hospitals and the poor are now served through Roti Bank. The people behind Roti Bank have one collection point where all the donations are put together. Volunteers take the food from here and distribute it. The collections are done from 8 different sectors into which the city is divided.

Although, many supporters of the initiative are offering help, Tara Patkar, the mind behind the Roti bank explains, “We are scared of wastage. We will not increase operations till we are sure of the beneficiaries.”

– Prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394


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Sanjha Chulha: This Famous Eatery from Kolkata Feeds the Underprivileged with their Food ATM

The restaurant generously donated meal packages to underprivileged children

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Sanjha Chulha
Food ATM is the part of a 'Hunger Free Kolkata' initiative. Facebook
  • Sanjha Chulha is a famous restaurant in Kolkata
  • The eatery has brought Food ATM to feed the city’s underprivileged 
  • An open refrigerator has been installed outside their restaurant and anyone with leftover food can donate it there

Kolkata, August 20, 2017: Thanks to Kolkata’s famous eatery called Sanjha Chulha, the city has got its very first food ATM to feed the underprivileged and hungry.

Outside their restaurant, Sanjha Chulha has installed a refrigerator. This is an open refrigerator that can be used by anyone who wants to help the starved by donating leftover food. The refrigerator was inaugurated on 15th August 2017. Additional to this kind gesture, the restaurant generously donated meal packages to underprivileged children.

Also Read: Americans Are Believed To Throw Away One-Third of The Available Food. How Then Are They Dealing With It? Read On To Know What Is Happening at The Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant

The ‘Right to food’ is a basic human right, yet it is a leading global menace. The third-world nations have the world’s hungriest people who don’t have regular access to a full meal.

The Government makes sure that food, a basic necessity of life, is provided to its people. India, also, is doing everything in its capacity to sincerely do so.

Sanjha Chulha’s open refrigerator comes as a result of a broader initiative called ‘Hunger Free Kolkata’. To track the storage levels of the refrigerator, a camera has been installed as well.

– Prepared by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter @Saksham2394


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 

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Saibaba Temple in Shirdi receives Rs 32 crores in Donations post Government’s demonetization step

Post demonitisation, the Saibaba Sansthan Trust has received a lump sum amount of around 31.73 cr in donations

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Sai Baba, Wikimedia

Shirdi (Maha), Dec 30, 2016: The Shri Saibaba Sansthan Trust at Shirdi  has received donations of  a sum of almost Rs 31.73 crore during the past 50 days post the government’s demonetization step, according to an official.

Sachin Tambe, one of the trustees of the Saibaba Sansthan said that these donations include Rs 4.53 crore in the scrapped Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 notes and Rs 3.80 crore in the new Rs 2,000 and Rs 500 notes denominations.

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During the last 50 days, the organization has received Rs 18.96 crore in donation boxes, Rs 4.25 crore, including Rs 2.62 crore through credit/debit cards, at its various donation counters, Rs 3.96 crore through bank demand drafts, Rs 1.46 crore in donations online and Rs 35 lakh through money orders, mentioned PTI.

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Cash donations were not all. The trust also received gold jewellery weighing nearly 2.90 kg worth around Rs 73 lakh and silver ornaments of 56 kg worth about Rs 18 lakh, he informed.

The trust also got Rs 3.18 crore from VIP devotees through darshan and aarti paid passes issued to them after November 8, Tambe mentioned.

In the last financial year, the famous Saibaba temple had received Rs 162 crore through donation boxes. This comes out to an average of Rs 44.38 lakh in a day.

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However, after demonetisation, the Sansthan received an average Rs 37.92 lakh donation in a day, Tambe added.

– prepared by Durba Mandal of NewsGram. Twitter: @dubumerang

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Meet Kasturi: ‘The Lady Manjhi’ who dug 25-feet deep well in parched Bundelkhand, UP

Living in the forest was a struggle, the only source of water nearby was a jhir (oozing water from rocks) that involved the collection of water drop by drop, said Kasturi

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(Representational Image) Image Source: Parched land
  • Kasturi, ‘The Lady Manjhi’ dug a well for 40 families after they were denied the access to a hand-pump by her upper-caste neighbours
  • It took her almost five years to dig the well completely
  • Living in forest was again a struggle, the only source of water nearby was a jhir (oozing water from rocks) that involved the collection of water drop by drop

Remember the chills you had when you first got to know about Dasaratha Boater ‘Mountain Man’ aka ‘Manjhi’ who alone with hammer and chisel cut to a street cast in high mountains! Here’s another story of strong will and impeccable strength that made a tribal woman dig a well almost single-handedly in the dried up area of Bundelkhand in Uttar Pradesh.

Meet Kasturi, ‘The Lady Manjhi’ who dug a well for 40 families after they were denied the access to a hand-pump by her upper-caste neighbours.

Talking about the daily struggle she and the other families went through to get even a single pot of drinking water, Kasturi said, “We are tribals and lived in Duddhi village. But we were not allowed to use the hand-pump by the upper caste residents. Arranging for a pot of drinking water was an everyday battle we had to face for the quest of survival,” reported TOI.

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It took her almost five years to dig the well completely. Speaking to TOI Kasturi iterated, “I told my sons that I will move to another place. In a few days, I made a hut near a forest area.”

In spite of being criticised by her sons and being constantly ridiculed by the villagers, Kasturi never gave up.

Living in the forest was again a struggle, the only source of water nearby was a jhir (oozing water from rocks) that involved the collection of water drop by drop.

Activist Amit Soni, who works for the Saharia tribe to which Kasturi belongs, said, “This was not a permanent source and often an entire day was needed to collect a pot of water.”

Initially, she would dig at different places but couldn’t succeed. She would often think of giving up but then had no other option.

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However, in January she was joined by her sons, daughter-in-law and daughter and by April almost 40 families joined her.

“In the mid of June, 25 feet deep well was ready but there was no water. Still, we decided to dig it further thinking that rain water would be conserved during monsoon. However, a week later, we hit a rock and water oozed out,” she added ecstatically.

– prepared by Bulbul Sharma, a staff writer at NewsGram. Twitter:  iBulbul_

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